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    HABAKKUK by John Gill Thou hast given a standard to them that fear thee; that it may be displayed because of the truth Psalm 60:4 INTRODUCTION TO HABAKKUK This book is called, in the Vulgate Latin and Syriac versions, “the Prophecy of Habakkuk”. Of this prophet, Aben Ezra and Kimchi say, we know neither his age nor his family; which shows they paid no regard to a tradition of their nation, mentioned by some of their ancient writers f1 , that he was the son of the Shunammite, whom Elisha raised from the dead; and find the etymology of his name in the words of the prophet to her, “about this season, according to the time of life, thou shalt embrace a son”, ( Kings 4:16) where the root of his name is used; and they account for the doubling of the last radical in his name, because of the two embraces of him, one by his mother, and the other by the prophet. His name indeed signifies “an embrace” f2 ; or, as some, “an embracer” f3 ; and the last letter being doubled, it is with others interpreted “the best embracer” f4 ; to which name his character and conduct agree; who, in the most tender manner, embraced the people of God, as parents their children, and comforted them with the assurance of their preservation, notwithstanding their captivity, and with the promise of the Messiah’s coming; suggesting to them they should live by faith, to which he led them the way by his own example, ( Habakkuk 1:12) ( Habakkuk 2:3,4 Habakkuk 3:17-19) but as this is placing him too early, to put him in the times of Elisha; so it is fixing him too late, to make him to be in the times of Daniel, and to feed him in the den of the lions, as Joseph ben Gorion f5 , and the author of the apocryphal book of Bel and the Dragon, say he did, which was after the Babylonish captivity was ended; whereas it is certain this prophet prophesied of it, and must have lived some time before it; for he speaks of the Chaldeans by name coming against the Jews, and carrying them captive, ( Habakkuk 1:6,9). The learned Huetius f6 , and others, think there were two prophets of this name; one of the tribe of Simeon, who lived before the captivity; and another of the tribe of Levi, who lived after it. The Jewish chronologers generally place this our prophet in the times of Manasseh; with which well enough agrees the description of the times the prophet lived in, given in ( Habakkuk 1:2-4) though some think he lived in the latter times of Josiah f8 , or the beginning of Jehoiakim f9 ; and it is probable he was a contemporary of the Prophet Jeremiah, with whom he agrees in many things, and prophesied of the same. However, there is no room to doubt of the authority of this book, being always received by the Jewish church, and agreeing with other parts of Scripture, and especially with the prophecies of Jeremiah; and may be further confirmed and established by the quotations out of it in the New Testament, as ( Habakkuk 1:5) in ( Acts 13:41) and ( Habakkuk 2:4) in ( Romans 1:17 Galatians 3:11 Hebrews 10:38). The general design of the prophecy is to comfort the people of God under the afflictions that were coming upon them, and to encourage them to the exercise of faith and patience, in the hope and view of the coming of the Messiah. Pseudo Epiphanius says that Habakkuk died two years before the people of the Jews returned from Babylon, and was honourably buried in his own native place, which he says was Bethsocher, in the tribe of Simeon. With whom Isidore agrees, as to the time of his death; but the place of his birth, he says, was Bethacat; and of his death, Sabarta.

    Sozomen reports, that, in the days of Theodosius, the grave of Habakkuk was found in Cele, formerly the city Ceila. So Eusebius says it was shown at Kela, eight miles from Eleutheropolis; though, in another place, he says it was to be seen at Gabbatha, twelve miles from the same place; which may be reconciled, by observing that it might be between them both, and be seen from each, since they were places near to each other f13 . But the Cippi Hebraici say it was at a place called Jakuk in Galilee, not far from Sephetta, where was an academy of the Jews; and this seems to agree with what Sanderson, a countryman of ours, as quoted by Van Till f15 , observes; that in his journey from Damascus to Jerusalem, between Sephet and Chapherchittin, he found a village, in which, the Jews report, Habakkuk the prophet dwelt and died, the name of which is Jeakoke. But these things are not to be depended on.

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