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  • LETTERS OF C. H. SPURGEON


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    TO REV. A. A. REES CHAPHAM,

    Dec. 14, 1867.

    MY DEAR MR.REES, —

    I congratulate you heartily and hope the tar brush will be laid on heavily, it is our reward from this world, what can it give us better?

    I like your Rainbow paper amazingly; you and I will be two equal heretics in prophecy one of these days. I am afraid you will lose caste among the prophets. 1867 is nearly over and Dr. Cumming must feel awkward I should think.

    How do things go on at Sunderland? Is the Lord with you? We are well spiritually —

    poor creatures otherwise.

    Yours very truly, C. H. SPURGEON.


    NEWINGTON, S.E.,

    June 26, 1869.

    DEAR FRIEND,—

    In brief reply. ( 1 ) Is a case of zeal overdoing its work. I don’t see how I can prevent it. ( 2 ) I wish I did know some one with whom to advise a change. O____ would have been a fit man, but he is gone to his rest. ( 3 ) H___ supplied for me once before and was capital. This time, probably his last, he was flat, stale and unprofitable I hear —

    but he is a good fellow and capable of good things. Why did not the Bishop of Sunderland let me know he would be in town, and I should have been, and others too, charmed to have his aid.

    Your friend L____ has refused to dismiss to such a wretch as I am, and yet I don’t wear a hatband or shut up the Tabernacle. Dear soul, has he dyspepsia?

    Yours truly, C. H. SPURGEON.


    CLAPHAM,

    10/9.

    DEAR FRIEND, —

    Thanks! It should have been hearts. I am always much obliged for these hints.

    Yours with much esteem, C. H. SPURGEON.


    CLAPHAM,

    April 14.

    MY DEAR FRIEND, —

    Thanks for check £2 10s. and thanks also for your good word. Oh! for divine keeping evermore, for it is as you say —

    one turning aside, and a life-long testimony is marred. Yet it shall not be so seeing we abide under the shadow of the Almighty.

    Yours ever heartily, C. H. SPURGEON.


    NIGHTINGALE LANE,

    Jan. 8.

    DEAR FRIEND, —

    Your letter is quite to my mind. The Lord reigneth. I feel low and weak and I am going away. Your paper was thankfully received, but the Australian letter took up all the space. Its early insertion will occur.

    Dear Brother, the Lord smile upon thee ever, and never permit thee to feel my glooms, which yet never cover all the sky.

    Yours heartily, C. H. SPURGEON.


    NIGHTINGALE LANE,

    May 7’ DEAR FRIEND, —

    I wrote to Mr. N___ I am, like yourself, more and more grieved to see the worldliness of professors. I have sharp work with it in the church.

    I have invited Messrs. M. & S. to the Tabernacle, but they say that if my preaching does not suffice neither will men be converted though one rose from the dead. They axe as humble as they are useful. I rejoice in them greatly. May you succeed in getting them to Sunderland.

    I wish I could read all your note, but I cannot and therefore if I do not answer pray excuse me. I spell and spell but you axe such an awful aristocrat that I cannot make out your hieroglyphics.

    Anyhow I love you.

    Yours truly, C. H. SPURGEON.


    NIGHTINGALE LANE,

    Jan. 17, [1877].

    DEAR FRIEND, —

    I think that at the time I spoke the rebuke was deserved, but I never meant to impute neglect of the poor to the voluntary principle, but rather to the form of government which produces the isolation of the churches, and their absolute independency. The Presbyterian and Wesleyan form of polity axe well adapted to reach the poorest localities and we can give abundant evidences to show that in Scotland by the Free Church and United Presbyterians the power of voluntary aid among the poor is abundantly illustrated, and in England all along by the Primitive Methodists.

    Please to note that since 1861 which is 15 or 16 years ago there have been remarkable changes, —

    churches have been removed from London into the suburbs, and on the other hand many noble missions of a purely voluntary character have arisen and have been successfully worked, as I hoped they would be when I spoke so severely.

    If your antagonist has no better argument than this very stale one, his cause is nigh unto death.

    Yours heartily, C. H. SPURGEON.


    WESTWOOD,

    May 17, 1880.

    DEAR FRIEND,—

    You shall have the Treasury as a present from me, and I shall count it only a very small token of my love to you. I think you will find good store in it of others’ thoughts, and mine may make the parsley on the dish.

    May our Lord ever bless you.

    Yours heartily, C. H. SPURGEON.


    WESTWOOD,

    Mar. 22, 1881.

    DEAR FRIEND, —

    When you speak of 40 years’ ministry you make me look up to you with reverent awe. Surely you must be getting old. Blessed be the Lord who has upheld you in honor and in strength. I joy and rejoice in His name as I think of His faithfulness to you.

    I have had rough sailing of late. This place, above the fogs, is perhaps worse in extreme winter for my disease, by reason of increased cold; but in ordinary times it must be much better; besides I can breathe here and do not feel like being inside a saucepan with the lid on. I feel sure the position with God’s blessing will be a permanent boon to me.

    Many thanks for £5 from your thanksgiving. The Lord is with us graciously in this work.

    Peace be to you, and all the blessings of the covenant.

    Yours ever most heartily, C. H. SPURGEON.


    WESTWOOD,

    Jan 3, 1882.

    DEAR FRIEND, —

    I am very grateful for your friends’ gift of £5 for orphans. By one and another the charges are borne by the Great Father; glory be to His name.

    I have been much pleased by an interview with Mr. Wigstone. May the Lord bless Spain by his means.

    May the old midshipman have a prosperous voyage this year.

    Yours heartily, C. H. SPURGEON.


    CLAPHAM,

    July 20. DEAR FRIEND,-Issue free tickets, making sure that you print no more than the place will honestly hold. Give these away discreetly by yourself and judicious friends, and not by public announcement.

    Scarcely a bill need be printed. I will, D.V., preach afternoon and evening.

    As to how I come please leave till later. I may perhaps bring my boys for a little trip.

    Yours truly, C. H. SPURGEON.

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