King James Bible Adam Clarke Bible Commentary Martin Luther's Writings Wesley's Sermons and Commentary Neurosemantics Audio / Video Bible Evolution Cruncher Creation Science Vincent New Testament Word Studies KJV Audio Bible Family videogames Christian author Godrules.NET Main Page Add to Favorites Godrules.NET Main Page




Bad Advertisement?

Are you a Christian?

Online Store:
  • Visit Our Store

  • FOOTNOTES


    PREVIOUS CHAPTER - NEXT CHAPTER >> - HELP - FACEBOOK     

    ft1. Thus translated by Boscawen: — “Now hear what briefly I reply.”

    ft2. Thus translated from the Latin of Horace by Francis: — “Whither tends This putid stuff?”

    ft3. Thus translated by Gifford: — “Again Crispinus comes!”

    ft4. Concerning the burning of heretics.

    ft5. Vol. VIII. pp.205-209 of the present Edition.

    ft6. Rendered by Boscawen, — “A many-headed beast.”

    ft7. One that affects the droll, and loves to raise a horse-laugh.

    ft8. Rising to more exalted strains

    ft9. This quotation from Horace is thus translated by Francis: “It breathes the spirit of the tragic scene.”

    ft10. As though you had accomplished some mighty affair.

    ft11. Harmless artillery.

    ft12. Attic elegance.

    ft13. The Bishop of Exeter’s Letter, pp. 2, 3.

    ft14. The letter thus subscribed was published at Cork, on May 30th last.

    ft15. Celebrated parts of Cork.

    ft16. A name first given to Mr. Cennick, from his first preaching on those words: “Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.”

    ft17. What is glory , without profit too?

    ft18. See the green laurel rears her graceful head O’er Virgil’s tomb! But can this cheer the dead?

    Happier by far thou wast of old, when laid Beneath thy spreading beech’s ample shade!

    ft19. This quotation from the Aeneid of Virgil is thus translated by Beresford: — This Ithacus desires, And Atreus’ sons with vast rewards shall buy.”

    ft20. With authority enough.

    ft21. This quotation from Horace is thus translated by Boscawen: — “What time, by his instructions cheer’d, He bade me train his sapient beard.”

    ft22. This accommodated quotation from Persius may be thus rendered: — “As if you had the most intimate knowledge of us.”

    ft23. You are not upon a level with Bishop Warburton. Let every man know his own size.

    ft24. Such as escaped my notice; or such as may be placed to the account of human infirmity.

    ft25. Thus translated from Juvenal by Gifford: — “The selfsame subject, in the selfsame words.”

    ft26. On this account.

    ft27. The one thing needful

    ft28. This quotation from Persius is thus translated by Drummond: — “Let me present a mind, Which civil and religious duties bind; A guileless heart, which no dark secrets knows, But with the generous love of virtue glows.”

    ft29. It is the lot of humanity to be ignorant of many things, and liable to error.

    ft30. Happy in their error

    ft31. Since the writing of this, I have seen several Tracts, which I shall have occasion to take notice of hereafter. There are likewise many excellent remarks on this subject in Mr. Hervey’s Dialogues.

    ft32. Mr. Hervey’s Theron and Aspasio: Dial. 11.

    ft33. Nothing can exceed this.

    ft34. A thousand arts of annoyance.

    ft35. By a late Act of Parliament, there is a happy alteration made in this particular.

    ft36. Dr. Taylor’s “Doctrine of Original Sin,” Part I., to whom I address myself in what follows. What is quoted from him, generally in his own words, is inclosed in commas.

    ft37. After your usual manner.

    ft38. Page

    ft39. Page 129.

    ft40. “The author has been censured here for not dropping a tear over the fair sex, under their sorrows and acute pains. But he imagines he has been dropping tears in every page, and that over every part of making.

    Undoubtedly he has; and is so, how unjust, how cruel, is that censure!”

    ft41. These quotations from Juvenal are thus translated by Gifford:— “What day so sacred, which no guilt profanes?” — “Nature still, Incapable of change, and fix’d in ill, Recurs to her old habits: — never yet Could sinner to his sin a period set.

    When did the flush of modest blood inflame The cheek once harden’d to the sense of shame?

    Or when the offender, since the birth of time, Retire, contented with a single crime?” “For youth is facile, and its yielding will Receives, with fatal ease, the print of ill.” —EDIT

    ft42. The more inward things of the kingdom of God.

    ft43. What! art thou one of them too! Thou, my son!

    ft44. From Mr. Boston’s “Fourfold State of Man.”

    ft45. Mr. Law’s words are enclosed all along in commas.

    ft46. To prove an unknown proposition by one equally unknown.

    ft47. See the Spectator .

    ft48. The proving of an unknown proposition by one still less known. —\parEDIT.

    ft49. The example is pleasing.

    ft50. This quotation from Horace is thus translated by Boscawen: — “These trifles serious mischief breed.”

    ft51. Ammae Mariae a Schurman Euklhria , Pars II., p. 118, etc.

    GOTO NEXT CHAPTER - WORKS OF WESLEY INDEX & SEARCH

    God Rules.NET
    Search 80+ volumes of books at one time. Nave's Topical Bible Search Engine. Easton's Bible Dictionary Search Engine. Systematic Theology Search Engine.