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  • C.H. SPURGEON - LECTURES TO MY STUDENTS -
    APPENDIX A.


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    BOOKS OF ANECDOTES,ILLUSTRATIONS,ETC.,REVIEWED IN “THE SWORD AND THE TROWEL”,AND NOT MENTIONED IN LECTURES AND 6. (SEE INTRODUCTORY NOTES,AND FOOT-NOTE ON PAGE 88.)

    GRAY (REV.JAMES COMPER), and CAREY (REV. C.S.).

    The Class and the Desk. Elliot Stock. 4 vols., 2s. each.

    An established favourite with Sunday-school teachers. The busy teacher will find here plenty of terse suggestions that will expand into lessons, and references to other books that will help in their exposition and illumination. GRAY (REV.JAMES COMPER). Topics for Preachers and Teachers. Elliot Stock. 5s.

    An invaluable book for all teachers. Full of illustrations, and abounding in matter for explaining and enforcing religious truth. We are glad to find the author of that capital work, The Class and the Desk, using his good taste and extensive knowledge to such an admirable purpose as in the book before us. The maps, letterpress, and multitude of woodcuts are all firstclass.

    No words of ours can too strongly commend it to the attention of our readers. Rays from the East; or, Illustrations of the Holy Scriptures, derived principally from the Manners of Eastern Nations. Religious Tract Society. 6s. (Out of print.) Since published in a series of Books for the People, 1d. each.

    Beautifully bound, and superabundantly furnished with engravings, this book will win its own way. It is growingly difficult to find anything new in the form of illustrations from the Bible, seeing that so many have reaped the field before; yet the author of this volume ... has been successful in bringing forth things new as well as old. We owe him thanks for a most attractive and instructive compilation, in which there is no affectation of language, but an evident aiming at simplicity. The Note-Book, a Collection of Anecdotes and Illustrations far the use of Teachers. Sunday School Union. 1s. 6d. (Out of print.)

    Not a very good-looking book so far as the printer’s work is concerned, but both cheap and useful ... This note-book is a small affair, and none the worse for that; it contains some very good things, and is well adapted for the use of teachers and lay preachers. The Biblical Treasury: an Illustrative Companion to the Bible, for the use of Sunday-school Teachers, Ministers, and Bible Students. Sunday School Union. 14 vols., 2s. each.

    Every teacher, without a single exception, should possess a full set of The Biblical Treasury, and in so doing he will have by him a great store of Scriptural illustrations. This is one of the very best things the Sunday School Union has ever done It is simply invaluable to the rank and the of the great army of Sunday school teachers. DENTON (MATTHEW). Anecdotes Illustrative of Religious and Moral Truth. Partridge and Co. 2s. (Out of print.)

    It is not easy to make a collection of anecdotes which shall be at all novel; our author has been moderately successful. These stories are most of them recognized by us as old acquaintances in books, but there are a few which we have not met with before in a separate form. They will amuse and interest most readers, and some of them will be useful for illustrations, but not all. Friends who have any one of the cyclopaedias will have no need of this volume; but those who are not so favored will do well to procure it. GOLDING (GODFREY). The Book of Good Devices, with a Thousand Precepts for Practice. Cossell and Co. 5s. (Out of print.)

    As thought-breeding a book as we have ever met with, wide in the range of its subjects, and yet judicious in its selection of extracts. The pages are encompassed with pithy, proverbial precepts, and many of the passages quoted are masses of terse, sententious utterance. It is altogether a live book, and a very beautiful one. BALFOUR (THOMAS A. G., M.D.). God’s Jewels; or, a Mineralogical Illustratian of Scripture. Edinburgh: Menzies. 2s. 6d. (Out of print.)

    A book upon jewels, and a jewel of a book. We hardly know of an instance in which such a thorough knowledge of gems has been found united with the illustrative faculty. Dr. Balfour is also as sound in his theology as he is profound in his mineralogy. The work is small, but contains more precious material for thought than will often be found in volumes of ten times the size. LEIFCHILD (REV. J., D.D.). Remarkable Facts: Illustrative and Confirmatary of Different Portions of the Holy Scripture. With a Preface by his Son. R.D. Dickinson. 2s.

    As might be expected from the great age of the author, the illustrations here collected are not such as dazzle by their novelty, but such as edify by their sober earnestness...All our aged ministers should, like Dr. Leifchild, leave behind them some record of personal reminiscences; by this means our treasury of illustrative facts would be enriched, and fresh evidence of the power of the gospel would be supplied. Ministers will find, among these remarkable facts, several of which they could make good use. MOODY (DWIGHT L.). Arrows and Anecdotes. With a sketch of his early life, byJOHN LOBB. Nicholson and Co. 1s.

    Some of these illustrations are original, and others have been borrowed from well-known sources, and modified; we had almost said, Moody-fied.

    Mr. Moody never scrupled to declare that, whatever he found that was good, he appropriated; and he was quite right in so doing. Now that Mr. Lobb has picked out the plums from the pudding, we see some of our own among them, and are glad they were so well used: but we see a great many of Mr. Moody’s own growth, which ministers of the gospel must take care to preserve for future use. This is a wise selection ot pithy bits and live stories, such as wake men up, and keep them awake, too. BARDSLEY (REV. J. W., M.A.). Illustrative Texts and Texts Illustrated. Nisbet and Co. 5s.

    There was no need for Mr. Bardsley to apologise, or think his illustrations ephemeral; the fact is, that many a preacher and teacher will rejoice over his ninety-and-two portions as one that findeth great spoil. The more of such suggestive books, the better. PHILLIPS (JOHN RICHARDSON). Remarkable Providences and Proofs of a Divine Revelation; with Thoughts and Facts For the Weak in Faith, the Doubter, and the Infidel. Partridge and Co. 7s. 6d. (Out of print.)

    A collection of most remarkable facts gathered from all sources. Readers cannot fail to be borne along the stream of interest which flows through these pages. Anecdotes for the Family and Social Circle. Partridge and Co. 3s. 6d. (Out of print.)

    The book is tastefully bound, but the stories are too much worn. We have enough collections of stale anecdotes, we should be glad of a few fresh ones. Still, there are many to whom the incidents will be quite novel, and such will have their money’s worth if they purchase this handsome book. VAUX (REV. J. E., M.A.). The Preacher’s Storehouse; a Collection of Pithy Sayings and Choice Passages on Religious and Moral Subjects. G. J. Palmer, 32, Little Queen Street, Lincoln’s Inn Fields. 7s. 6d.

    The plan of this “Storehouse” is good, but we do not think that the compiler has selected the stores so well as he might have done. They are rather a mixed medley, and there is not enough of the gracious element in them to please us. Still, for a High Churchman, the selection of extracts is wonderfully Catholic, and the result must be helpful to young beginners in the ministry. Upon useful theological subjects, pithy quotations are given, consisting of proverbs, metaphors, and expositions: these will supply the preacher with many a fresh thought and striking phrase. BERTRAM (REV. R. A.). A Dictionary of Poetical Illustrations. R. D. Dickinson. 12s. 6d.

    One of the most useful books a minister can possess ... Even if a man does not quote poetry in his sermons, it is always helpful for him to know what the great bards have said upon his subject. There are certainly better collections than this; but it is a notable addition to those which have gone before.

    BERTRAM (REV. R.A.).

    A Homiletic Encyclopadia of Illustrations in Theology and Morals. R.D. Dickinson. 12s. 6d.

    This strikes us as being a very valuable compilation, such as might take a lifetime for a man to form for himself. It will be a golden treasury to those who know how to use it discreetly; but it will be of still more value to those who are led by its example to attempt the production of commonplace-books for themselves. Mr. Bertram must have taken great pains, and exercised much holy industry, in collecting the important extracts which are here carefully arranged and placed under their separate heads. The volume is an important addition to a minister’s library. NEIL (REV. JAMES, M.A.). Rays from the Realms af Nature; or, Parables of Plant Life. Long Neil and Co., Chancery Lane. 2s. 6d.

    This is a book after our own heart. It gathers from trees and flowers facts wherewith to set forth moral and spiritual truth. This is the right use of Nature. It is reading one of the works of the Great Author by the light of another, comparing utterance with utterance. HOOD (REV. E.PAXTON). The World of Moral and Religious Anecdote. Hodder and Stoughton. 6s.

    This is a new and cheap edition of Mr. Hood’s remarkable collection of incidents. We long ago perused these odd, piquant, and notable stories, and we were greatly amused; but we cannot say that we ever thought much of the production so far as the usefulness or even the religiousness of some of the stories is concerned; for certain of the anecdotes should have been suppressed. Our friend could have done much better than collect such “a universe of undigested and unorganised anecdote.” Still, having growled our growl, we are bound to add that we:should have been very sorry to have missed either The World of Anecdote, or The World af Religious Anecdote, with which we have beguiled many a pleasant interval of leisure. LONG (REV. J.). Eastern Proverbs and Emblems Illuslrating Old Truths . Trubner and Co. 6s.

    This book contains a large number of proverbs which have not hitherto entered into our western currency, and the emblems are frequently beautiful and useful; still, it is badly put together, and the matter is not always appropriate to the subject which it is intended to illustrate. Here we have all the makings of a good book, but, for want of a little tact, the work does not come out from the author’s hand in so complete a form as it might have done. We feel indebted to the writer for many new symbols and sayings, and if he will use the pruning-knife when bringing out a new edition, his book will become a standard work. PIKE (RICHARD). Remarkable Religious Anecdotes. Derby: Wilkins and Ellis. 1s.

    These anecdotes are most of them fresh and striking, and we have enjoyed their perusal. The little book is really not a bad shilling’s-worth. HOYT (J. K.)AND WARD (ANNA L.). The Cyclopcedia of Practical Quotations, English and Latin, with an Appendix af Proverbs, etc. R. D. Dickinson. 12s. 6d.

    A very useful book for a literary man, to whom the copious index will be a great boon. Its production has cost much labor, and it will, in consequence, save labor to those who use it. It is deservedly called “practical”, since it is not for show, but for real work. In this respect it excels all other quotation books which have hitherto come under our notice. NYE. (J. L.). Anecdotes on Bible Texts. Sunday School Union. 9 vols. (New Testament.) 1s. each.

    May the compiler be encouraged to illustrate every book of the Bible in. this fashion! Mr. Nye is doing great service to all teachers and preachers.

    Some of his anecdotes will be well known to his readers; but, as a whole, they are as fresh as they are useful. Who buys these shilling’s — worths gets good bargains. PROSSER (ELEANOR B.). Fables for You .” Wilh Illustrations. “Home Words” Office, Paternoster Square. 2s. 6d.

    We feel deeply grateful to Mrs. Prosser for these fables. She has not occupied time in giving the moral of each story, but has made every one so plain that it tells its own lesson. The Voice of Wisdom. A Treasury of Moral Truths from the Best Authors.

    Selected by J. E. Edinburgh: Nimmo and Co. as. 6d. (Out of print.)

    A collection of extracts, proverbs, etc., arranged alphabetically under certain subjects. We do not think the selection is either the best or the worst that could be made. We do not see what end the compiler had in view, for one could hardly make much use of the brief passages which he has arranged. Yet he has at least shown that, out of the old fields cometh all the new corn, and out of the old books cometh all the new matter which men learn; even as Chaucer told us long ago. The quotations are many of them quite fresh, though others are as old as Egyptian mummies. Together, they make up a treasury which many a man might feel rich in possessing, though there are far better volumes of the same order.

    HOOD (REV. E.PAXTON).

    The World of Proverb and Parable, wilh Illustrations from History, Biography, and the Anecdotal Table-talk of all Ages. R. D. Dickinson. 5s. 6d.

    This huge volume contains a flowing flood of stories and a mass of information as to the sources where more of the same sort may be found ..

    He who purchases this mountain of proverbs and parables will have a mine of wealth for his money . We are in justice forced to add that we have made gallant attempts to read this book through, but have found it heavy work. It is a wonderful book; but the author does not take pains enough with his materials when he has collected them. After having said so much, we, with unabated earnestness, commend this voluminous work to those who want striking things, and know how to use them. MACLAREN (REV.ALEXANDER, D.D.). Pictures and Emblems, being Illustrations from his Sermons. “Christian Commonwealth” Office,73, Ludgate Hill. 5s.

    This beloved author needs no letters of commendation to our readers. He hath dust of gold. Even his leaf shall not wither. Here we have a wealth of symbol and emblem which cannot be surpassed. Scientific Illustratians and Symbols; Moral Truths Mirrored in Scientific Facts. By a Barrister of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple. R. D. Dickinson. 7s. 6d.

    The idea which is here wrought out is a rich one, and will be further taken up by others. The scientific facts selected are many of them highly illustrative. The man who could not find metaphors and emblems by the aid of this book, must be dull indeed. This capital volume ought to have a large sale. ADAMSON (REV.WILLIAM, D.D.). The Religious Anecdotes of Scotland. Glasgow: T. D. Morison. 5s.

    A fine collection of fine old stories, such as could only have been told in the land of Calvinism and robust manhood. We know most of the narratives; indeed, they must be numbered with thrice-told tales. But many of them will be new to southerners though familiar enough to our northern brethren. Dr. Adamson has compiled a valuable and thoroughly lively book.

    THOMSON (W. M., D.D.)

    The Land and the Book. Nelson and Sons. vols., 21s. each.

    This is far ahead of all other publications the book upon the Holy Land and its surrounding territories. Our obligations to Dr. Thomson can never be fully set forth; he has observed carefully, noted wisely, and recorded patiently. You feel at home with him, he never comes the learned professor over you ... Messrs. Nelson’s edition, in three handsome volumes, is a prize for which a man of slender means may wisely enter upon a struggle of self-denial, economy, and special industry. The store of suggestion and illustration herein laid up will never be exhausted in any one life-time. (The original work entitled, The Land and the Book, was published in one volume at 7s. 6d., and was therefore in price more suitable for “a man of slender means.” It is still procurable, both new and second-hand. Some booksellers offer the three-volume edition for 3is. 6d.) Anecdotes Illuslrative of Old Testament Texts. Hodder and Stoughton.

    Very good. We have here a very fair admixture of new anecdotes, together with certain old ones which are inevitable. Good money’s worth at six shillings Get it. There is a companion volume entitled, Anecdotes Illustralive of New Testament Texts. MARSH (REV. F. E.). Similes of the Christian Life . J.F. Shaw and Co.

    A preacher or teacher would think of a series of sermons or addresses as he read this book. It is not so much what it contains as what it suggests which makes this a desirable purchase; yet it is good in its own way. Emblems of the Holy Spirit. Equally gracious, and at the same price, namely, 1s. 6d. Thirty Thousand Thoughts, being Extracts covering a Comprehensive Circle of Religious and Allied Topics. Edited by the Very Rev. H. D. M. SPENCE, M.A., Rev. Joseph S.EXELL, M.A., and Rev. CharlesNEIL, M.A. Nisbet and Co. 6 vols., 16s. each. (Mr. Dickinson has published an unabridged reprint at 25s., carriage paid.)

    Even unto this last we are unable to see the usefulness of the plan of this work. The scheme was laid down at the commencement, but the result is that the extracts are, to our mind, more in a muddle than they would have been had there been no plan at all. Moreover, we do not judge the extracts themselves to be so excessively valuable as to be worth putting into huge volumes. Some of them are surpassingly precious; but more are excellent common-places, and nothing beyond. MACKEY (REV. H.O.). One Thousand New Illustrations for the Pulpit, Platform, and Class. R.D. Dickinson. 3s. 6d.

    Our friend, Mr. Mackey, has collected a thousand illustrations, and he justly calls them “new.” He has not occupied space by working out the moral of the fact which he quotes; but he indicates, by a brief heading, the subject which he intended to illuminate. We are glad to see one of our rising ministry addicting himself to searching out striking things. BAXENDALE (REV.WALTER). Dictionary of 6,330 Anecdotes, Incidents, and Illustrative Facts, Selected and Arranged for the Pulpit and the Platform. R.D. Dickinson. 12s. 6d.

    There are many cyclopaedias of anecdote, and they are all of them useful.

    Some of them are pre-eminently serviceable, and we would not say a word in their disparagement, but quite the reverse. Of course, each compiler has the advantage of his predecessors, because he can use the pick of their stuff, and add thereto his own gatherings. It is not surprising, therefore, that Mr. Baxendale should have, in some points, surpassed other excellent collectors and arrangers of illustrations; but we certainly think that he has done so. Taking this book for all in all, it is the best of its kind. The price, as Mr. Dickinson offers it, is very low for so large a volume; and as for the quality, it is very high for so immense a mass of matter. All preachers, speakers, and teachers, who choose to avail themselves of Mr. Baxendale’s services, will find themselves greatly the better for them. EXELL (REV.JOSEPH S.). The Bible Illustrator; or, Anecdotes, Similes, Emblems, Illustrations, Expository, Scientific, Geographical, Historical, on the Verses of the Bible. (In progress. Intending purchasers should apply to Messrs. Nisbet and Co. for list of volumes issued.) Plenty of matter for your money. We never remember to have seen such solid pages; and in small type, too! The books are literally crammed. They remind us of trusses of compressed hay. Portions from sermons, commentaries, and all sorts of books, are used as expositions on the various verses and they have been, upon the whole, right well selected and arranged. Mr. Exell has a great gift in that direction, and he uses it with marvelous diligence. This begging, borrowing, and stealing of the thoughts of authors has become quite an art.

    CHRISTY (ROBERT).

    Proverbs, Maxims, and Phrases of all Ages. Classed Subjectively, and Arranged Alphabetically. T. Fisher Unwin.

    These are two splendid volumes. Students of proverbial lore will bless the laborious compiler. Chiefly is he to be praised for his system of arrangement, which is unique, and practically useful ... We felt half sorry to see these volumes, because we are preparing a similar work .. and we were afraid that we were cut out of our market; but ours is a different thing altogether, and will suit, by its price, a class of persons who could not afford a guinea for these two volumes, which are, nevertheless, exceedingly well worth the money. We heartily recommend this publication, and wish it a large sale; it deserves it. TINGLING (REV. J. F. B., B.A.). Fifteen Hundred Facts and Similes for Sermons and Addresses. Hodder and Stoughton. 6s.

    A collection of illustrations which will be useful to those who know how to weave them into their instructions. Mr. Tinling has made a fine selection.

    Many of the similes will be quite new to the general reader; and they are so well arranged and indexed, that their value for practical purposes will be greatly enhanced. This is a good minister’s book. FULLERTON (W. Y.). God’s Jewels: Twelve Chapters on the Privilege and Glory of God’s People with many Illustrations and Incidents, Drawn from the Science and History af Precious Stones and Pearls. Passmore and Alabaster. 1s. 6d.

    There are several books upon the subject of precious stones, in which these choice things are made to flash with the light of holy instruction; but this little work is equal to any one of them. It is replete with interest.

    Everything about jewels which can be used for sacred service is turned to account. Mr. Fullerton has not hammered out gold leaf, but he has given solid gold, — nuggets of it. He has so many illustrations that he does not linger long on any one, but passes on to the next, and the next. Having studied this subject carefully, and having lectured upon it at considerable length, we are in the position of a qualified judge, and we award a first prize to this very beautiful book. MILLIGAN (REV.JAMES, D.D.). Aphorisms, Maxims, and Short Sentences. Edinburgh: Oliphant and Co. 3s. net.

    Collectors of aphorisms should add this to their treasures.. Among the pithy sayings are some of surpassing excellence. GEIKIE (REV.CUNNINGHAM, D.D.). The Holy Land and the Bible. A Book of Scripture Illustrations Gathered in Palestine. Cossell and Co. 21s.

    A noble addition to our books on the Holy Land. The author tells us that he visited Palestine with the intention of gathering illustrations of the Scriptures from the land which is “a natural commentary on the Sacred Writings which it has given to us.” The whole of the Palestine of the Bible .. is laid under contribution in order to obtain illustrations of the Old and New Testaments... The volume is copiously and tastefully illustrated. KNIGHT (ALFRED E.). Gleanings from Bible Lands: Over 500 Passages of Scripture Illustrated. Passmore and Alabaster. 2s. 6d.

    This is a book which deserves a large circulation. A minister with small means would get the gist of a library upon the East in this handy volume. A teacher would find both themes and illustrations. A devout reader would feel himself instructed and pleased. The author calls his book “gleanings”, but in it we find golden sheaves. NEIL (REV.JAMES, M.A.). Pictured Palestine. Nisbet and Co. 7s. 6d.

    Mr. Neil’s residence in Jerusalem, where he was Incumbent of Christ Church, enabled him to gather a store of stories illustrative of Bible incidents, and these are told in a most interesting manner in Pictured Palestine; while Mr. James Clark, Mr. Henry A. Harper, and other artists, have enriched the volume with pictorial illustrations of the scenes described. The Cyclopaedia of Nature Preachings. With an introduction by HughMACMILLAN, LL.D. Elliot Stock. 7s. 6d.

    A valuable book for lovers of the work of grace as illustrated in nature. In this volume, hill and dale, mountain and valley, air, earth, fire, and water, are all brought into requisition to illustrate the truths of the Word of God.

    Students and ministers will delight in this cyclopaedia, and give it a prominent place upon their book-shelves. BULLOCK (REV.CHARLES, B.D.). Matches that Strike. “Home Words” Office, Paternoster Square. 5s.

    This is a book of anecdotes, and a capital collection it is, too. We have long praised Mr. Bullock as an excellent book-maker, but we did not know that he had become a match-maker. Some of the wood of which the “matches” are made was cut from what Americans call “chestnut” trees, but they will “strike” just as well as if they had never been used before; and they will help to light up many a dull discourses or brighten an otherwise gloomy Temperance address. PROCTOR (REV. F. B., M.A.). Classified Gems of Thought. Hodder and Stoughton. 7s. 6d..

    This new and cheap edition of an apt and useful treasury of exposition and illustration will be a boon to many a preacher. It is stimulative and suggestive, without being exhaustive. The best and greatest writers are quoted, and yet the usual routine passages are avoided. SPURGEON (C. H.). What the Stones Say; or, Sermons in Stones. Fully illustrated. With Notes by J. L.KEYS, and Introduction by PastorTHOMAS SPURGEON. London: “Christian Herald” Publishing Co., Tudor Street, E.C. 1s. and 2s.

    Mr. Keys was the privileged possessor of a verbatim report of Mr. Spurgeon’s notable lecture on Sermons in Stones, and he wisely decided to publish it. In very copious Notes, he has inserted extracts from various works upon stones such as he believes the beloved lecturer would have been likely to incorporate into his work if he had been spared to see it printed. All Mr. Spurgeon’s friends should purchase this little volume; the many illustrations with which it is adorned add greatly to its value. MARSHALL (WILLIAM). Nature as a Book of Symbols. Hodder and Stoughton. 3s. 6d.

    This book is written in a reverent spirit, and with distinct regazd to literary form. We hoped, from the opening pages, to find it more intensive in character than it proved to be; the thought is spread out too widely.

    Perhaps we allowed expectation too readily to soar; but certainly there was the early promise of something more abstruse than is forthcoming. Still, no exception can be taken to the general quality of the work. Revelation is honored, the Incarnate Word exalted, and Nature invariably contemplated through a spiritual lens. The book is one for the heart, and deserves a large circulation.

    MOODIE (WILLIAM).

    Tools for Teachers; a Collection of Anecdotes, Illustrations, Legends, etc., for Teachers of Sunday-schools, Bible Classes, and Boys’ Brigades. Elliot Stock. 5s.

    Illustrations are indispensable “tools for teachers” who would be workmen needing not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the Word of Truth. Mr.

    Moodie, in his Sunday-school work, found the necessity of such tools; and having collected a large and admirable assortment of them, he has now made them available for other workers. Many of the:anecdotes here published have already appeared in one or other of the:many cyclopaedias; but there are sufficient new ones to give this compilation a distinct character of its own.

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