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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Micah 7:3


    CHAPTERS: Micah 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20

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    King James Bible - Micah 7:3

    That they may do evil with both hands earnestly, the prince asketh, and the judge asketh for a reward; and the great man, he uttereth his mischievous desire: so they wrap it up.

    World English Bible

    Their hands are on that which is evil to do it diligently. The ruler and judge ask for a bribe; and the powerful man dictates the evil desire of his soul. Thus they conspire together.

    Douay-Rheims - Micah 7:3

    The evil of their hands they call good: the prince requireth, and the judge is for giving: and the great man hath uttered the desire of his soul, and they have troubled it.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    That they may do evil with both hands earnestly, the prince asketh, and the judge asketh for a reward; and the great man, he uttereth his mischievous desire: so they
    wrap it up.

    Original Hebrew

    על
    5921 הרע 7451 כפים 3709 להיטיב 3190 השׂר 8269 שׁאל 7592 והשׁפט 8199 בשׁלום 7966 והגדול 1419 דבר 1696 הות 1942 נפשׁו 5315 הוא 1931 ויעבתוה׃ 5686

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (3) -
    Pr 4:16,17 Jer 3:5 Eze 22:6

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 7:3

    Para completar la maldad con sus manos, el príncipe demanda, y el juez juzga por recompensa; y el grande habla el antojo de su alma, y lo confirman.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Micah 7:3

    Verse 3. That they may do
    evil with both hands] That is, earnestly, greedily, to the uttermost of their power. The Vulgate translates: Malum manuum suarum dicunt bonum; "The evil of their hands they call good." The prince asketh] A bribe, to forward claims in his court.

    The judge asketh for a reward] That he may decide the cause in favour of him who gives most money, whether the cause be good or evil. This was notoriously the case in our own country before the giving of Magna Charta; and hence that provision, Nulli vendemus justitiam aut rectum: "We will not sell justice to any man." And this was not the only country in which justice and judgment were put to sale.

    The great man, he uttereth his mischievous desire] Such consider themselves above law, and they make no secret of their unjust determinations. And so they wrap it up-they all conjoin in doing evil in their several offices, and oppressing the poor; so our translators have interpreted the original hwtb[yw vayeabtuha, which the versions translate variously. Newcome has, "And they do abominably.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 3. That they may do evil with both hands earnestly , etc.] Or “well” f212 , strenuously, diligently, to the utmost of their power, labouring at it with all their might and main; as wicked men generally are more industrious, and exert themselves more to do evil than good men do to do good; and even weary themselves to commit iniquity: or, “instead of doing good”, as Marinus in Aben Ezra, take a great deal of pains to do evil; work with both hands at it, instead of doing good. The Septuagint and Arabic versions render it, “they prepare their hands for evil”; the Syriac version is, “their hands are read? to evil, and they do not do good”; with which agrees the Targum, “they do evil with their hands, and do not do good.”

    Some make the sense to depend on what goes before and follows; “to do evil, both hands” are open and ready, and they hurt with them; “but to do, good the prince asketh, and the judge for a reward” f213 ; forward enough to do evil, but very backward to do any good office; the prince asketh, and the judge [asketh] for a reward ; and, if they do it, must be bribed, and have a reward for it, even persons of such high character; but this sense is not favoured by, the accents; besides, by what follows, it seems as if the “prince”, by whom may be meant the king upon the throne, and the “judge” he that sits upon the bench under him, sought for bribes to do an ill thing; to give a cause wrong against a poor man, and in favour of a rich man that will bribe high: and the great [man] he uttereth his mischievous desire ; the depravity, corruption, and perverseness of his soul; who is either some great man at court, that, being encouraged by the example of the prince and judge, openly and publicly requires a bribe also to do an ill thing; and without any shame or blushing promises to do it on that consideration; or a counsellor at the bar, who openly declares that he will speak in such a cause, though a bad one, and defend it, and not doubt of carrying it; or else this is some rich wicked man, that seeks to oppress his poor neighbour, and, being favoured by the prince and judge he has bribed, does without fear or shame speak out the wickedness of his heart, and what an ill design he has against his neighbour, whose mischief, hurt, and ruin, he seeks: so they wrap it up together ; or, “twist it together” f214 ; as cords are, which thereby become strong; slid so these three work up this mischievous business, and strengthen and establish it; and such a threefold cord of wickedness is not easily broken or unravelled: or, “they perplex it” f215 ; as thick branches of trees are implicated and wrapped together; so these agree to puzzle and perplex a cause, that they may have some show of carrying it with justice and truth. So the Vulgate Latin version renders it, “they trouble it”; confound the matter, and make it dark, dubious, and difficult.

    The Targum is, “they corrupt it”; or deprave it; put an ill sense on things, and make a wrong construction of them.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-7 - The prophet bemoans himself that he lived among a people ripening apac for ruin, in which many good persons would suffer. Men had no comfort no satisfaction in their own families or in their nearest relations Contempt and violation of domestic duties are a sad symptom of universal corruption. Those are never likely to come to good who ar undutiful to their parents. The prophet saw no safety or comfort but in looking to the Lord, and waiting on God his salvation. When unde trials, we should look continually to our Divine Redeemer, that we ma have strength and grace to trust in him, and to be examples to thos around us.


    Original Hebrew

    על 5921 הרע 7451 כפים 3709 להיטיב 3190 השׂר 8269 שׁאל 7592 והשׁפט 8199 בשׁלום 7966 והגדול 1419 דבר 1696 הות 1942 נפשׁו 5315 הוא 1931 ויעבתוה׃ 5686


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20

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