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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Song of Solomon 5:10
    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

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    King James Bible - Song of Solomon 5:10

    My beloved is white and ruddy, the chiefest among ten thousand.

    World English Bible

    My beloved is white and ruddy. The best among ten thousand.

    Douay-Rheims - Song of Solomon 5:10

    My beloved is white and ruddy, chosen out of thousands.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    My beloved is white and ruddy, the chief among ten thousand.

    Original Hebrew

    דודי
    1730 צח 6703 ואדום 122 דגול 1713 מרבבה׃ 7233

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (10) -
    So 2:1 De 32:31 Ps 45:17 Isa 66:19 Heb 7:26

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 5:10

    Mi amado es blanco y rubio, seńalado entre diez mil.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Song of Solomon 5:10

    Verse 10. My
    beloved is white and ruddy - Red and white, properly mixed, are essential to a fine complexion; and this is what is intimated: he has the finest complexion among ten thousand persons; not one in that number is equal to him. Literally, "He bears the standard among ten thousand men;" or "He is one before whom a standard is borne," i.e., he is captain or chief of the whole.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 10. My
    beloved [is] white and ruddy , etc.] This, and the following verses, contain the church’s answer to the question of the daughters; she first gives a general description of her beloved, and then descends to particulars: the description of him in general is, that he is “white and ruddy”; having the whiteness of the lily, and the redness of the rose, ( Song of Solomon 2:1); which make a perfect beauty. Some understand this of the two natures in Christ, divine and human; with respect to his divine nature, “white”, expressive of his simplicity, purity and holiness; which colour, Cicero says f331 , is chiefly becoming God, it being simple, and having no mixture and composition in it: with respect to his human nature, “red”, being a partaker of the same flesh and blood with his people. Others, only of the human nature; “white” denoting the purity and holiness of it, being without either original or actual sin; “red”, or “ruddy”, his bloody sufferings in it for the sins of his people. But it may denote, in general, his fairness, beauty, and glory; being, as a divine Person, the brightness of his Father’s glory; as man; fairer than the children of men; as the Mediator, full of grace and truth; and in all his offices, as Prophet, Priest, and King, and in all the relations he stands in to his, as Father, Husband, Brother, and Friend, he appears most lovely and amiable; the chiefest among ten thousand ; whether angels or men; he is the Creator of angels, the object of their worship; and has a more excellent name and nature than they, to whom they are subject, and are ministering spirits; he is superior to men, good and bad, high and low; Lord of all, King of kings, and Head of saints, and has the pre-eminence over all creatures. The Septuagint version is, “chosen out of” or “from ten thousand”; Christ, as man, is chosen of God, from among the myriads of the individuals of human nature, to union with the divine Word, or Son of God; (see Psalm 89:19); as God-man and Mediator, to be the alone Saviour and Redeemer of his people; to be the Head of the body, the church; and to be the Judge of quick and dead; and he is chosen by sensible sinners to be the object of their love; to be their only Saviour; and to be their Ruler and Governor, whose laws, commands, and ordinances, they choose to obey; (see Psalm 73:24); The words may be rendered, “the standard bearer”, or “one standarded by” or “over ten thousand” f332 ; the church is militant, and has many enemies; in the name of the Lord, she sets up her banners against them, and the banner over her is the “love” of Christ, ( Song of Solomon 2:4); and he is the standard bearer, who has a multitude of angels and saints under his standard; and how stately and majestic does he look, and what a noble sight is it to see him bearing the standard before such a company! ( Revelation 7:9). Or the sense is, Christ is a more excellent standard bearer than all others f333 ; there may be ten thousand persons that carry a flag, but none to be compared with him, for comeliness, strength, and courage: or he is lifted up, as a standard, above others, angels and men; as he was upon the cross, and now, in the ministry of the word, that souls may gather unto him, and enlist themselves in his service; (see Isaiah 11:10).

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Christ's answer. (Song 5:1) The disappointments of the church from he own folly. (Song 5:2-8) The excellences of Christ. (Song 5:9-16)

    Song 5:1 See how ready Christ is to accept the invitations of his people. What little good there is in us would be lost, if he did no preserve it to himself. He also invites his beloved people to eat an drink abundantly. The ordinances in which they honour him, are means of grace.

    Song 5:2-8 Churches and believers, by carelessness and security provoke Christ to withdraw. We ought to notice our spiritual slumber and distempers. Christ knocks to awaken us, knocks by his word an Spirit, knocks by afflictions and by our consciences; thus, Rev. 3:20 When we are unmindful of Christ, still he thinks of us. Christ's love to us should engage ours to him, even in the most self-denyin instances; and we only can be gainers by it. Careless souls put slight on Jesus Christ. Another could not be sent to open the door. Chris calls to us, but we have no mind, or pretend we have no strength, or we have no time, and think we may be excused. Making excuses is makin light of Christ. Those put contempt upon Christ, who cannot find in their hearts to bear a cold blast, or to leave a warm bed for him. Se the powerful influences of Divine grace. He put in his hand to unbol the door, as one weary of waiting. This betokens a work of the Spiri upon the soul. The believer's rising above self-indulgence, seeking by prayer for the consolations of Christ, and to remove every hinderanc to communion with him; these actings of the soul are represented by the hands dropping sweet-smelling myrrh upon the handles of the locks. But the Beloved was gone! By absenting himself, Christ will teach his people to value his gracious visits more highly. Observe, the sou still calls Christ her Beloved. Every desertion is not despair. Lord, believe, though I must say, Lord, help my unbelief. His words melte me, yet, wretch that I was, I made excuses. The smothering and stiflin of convictions will be very bitter to think of, when God opens ou eyes. The soul went in pursuit of him; not only prayed, but used means sought him in the ways wherein he used to be found. The watchme wounded me. Some refer it to those who misapply the word to awakene consciences. The charge to the daughters of Jerusalem, seems to mea the distressed believer's desire of the prayers of the feebles Christian. Awakened souls are more sensible of Christ's withdrawing than of any other trouble.

    Song 5:9-16 Even those who have little acquaintance with Christ, cannot but see amiable beauty in others who bear his image. There are hopes of those who begin to inquire concerning Christ and his perfections Christians, who are well acquainted with Christ themselves, should d all they can to make others know something of him. Divine glory make him truly lovely in the eyes of all who are enlightened to discer spiritual things. He is white in the spotless innocence of his life ruddy in the bleeding sufferings he went through at his death. Thi description of the person of the Beloved, would form, in the figurativ language of those times, a portrait of beauty of person and of grace of manners; but the aptness of some of the allusions may not appear to us He shall come to be glorified in his saints, and to be admired in all that believe. May his love constrain us to live to his glory __________________________________________________________________


    Original Hebrew

    דודי 1730 צח 6703 ואדום 122 דגול 1713 מרבבה׃ 7233


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

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