King James Bible Adam Clarke Bible Commentary Martin Luther's Writings Wesley's Sermons and Commentary Neurosemantics Audio / Video Bible Evolution Cruncher Creation Science Vincent New Testament Word Studies KJV Audio Bible Family videogames Christian author Godrules.NET Main Page Add to Favorites Godrules.NET Main Page




Bad Advertisement?

News & Reviews:
  • World News
  • Movie Reviews
  • Book Search

    Are you a Christian?

    Online Store:
  • Your Own eBook/eBay Business
  • Visit Our eBay Store

    Automated eBook Business



  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Song of Solomon 5:3
    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR   |   VIDEO: BIB - COMM

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - РУССКАЯ БИБЛИЯ - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

    King James Bible - Song of Solomon 5:3

    I have put off my coat; how shall I put it on? I have washed my feet; how shall I defile them?

    World English Bible

    I have taken off my
    robe. Indeed, must I put it on? I have washed my feet. Indeed, must I soil them?

    Douay-Rheims - Song of Solomon 5:3

    I have put off my
    garment, how shall I put it on? I have washed my feet, how shall I defile them?

    Webster's Bible Translation

    I have put off my
    coat; how shall I put it on? I have washed my feet; how shall I defile them?

    Original Hebrew

    פשׁטתי
    6584 את 853 כתנתי 3801 איככה 349 אלבשׁנה 3847 רחצתי 7364 את 853 רגלי 7272 איככה 349 אטנפם׃ 2936

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (3) -
    Pr 3:28; 13:4; 22:13 Mt 25:5; 26:38-43 Lu 11:7 Ro 7:22,23

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 5:3

    Me he desnudado mi ropa; ¿cómo la tengo de vestir? He lavado mis pies; ¿cómo los tengo de ensuciar?

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Song of Solomon 5:3

    Verse 3. I have
    pet off my coat - The bride must have been in a dream or in much disorder of mind to have made the frivolous excuses here mentioned. The words relate to the case of a person who had gone to take rest on his bed. As they wore nothing but sandals, they were obliged to wash their feet previously to their lying down. I have washed my feet, taken off my clothes, and am gone to bed: I cannot therefore be disturbed.

    A Hindoo always washes his feet before he goes to bed. If called from his bed, he often makes this excuse, I shall daub my feet; and the excuse is reasonable, as the floors are of earth; and they do not wear shoes in the house. - WARD.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 3. I have put off my coat , etc.] In order to lie down on her bed at night, and take her ease; meaning her conversation garments, which she had not been careful of to keep, but had betook herself to carnal ease and rest, and was off her watch and guard, ( Nehemiah 4:23 Revelation 16:15); and being at ease, and free from trouble, affliction, and persecution, was unwilling to arise and go with her beloved, lest she should meet with the same trials and sufferings as before, for the sake of him and his Gospel; which may be greatly the sense of her next words; how shall I put it on ? which suggests an apprehension of difficulty in doing it, it being easier to drop the performance of duty than to take it up again; and shows slothfulness and sluggishness, being loath and not knowing how to bring herself to it; and an aversion of the carnal and fleshly part unto it; yea, as if she thought it was unreasonable in Christ to desire it of her, when it was but her reasonable service; or as if she imagined it was dangerous, and would be detrimental to her rest, and prejudicial to her health; I have washed my feet ; as persons used to do when come off of a journey, and about to go to bed f319 , being weary; as she was of spiritual exercises, and of the observance of ordinances and duties, and so betook herself to carnal ease, and from which being called argues, how shall I defile them ? by rising out of bed, and treading on the floor, and going to the door to let her beloved in; as if hearkening to the voice of Christ, obeying his commands, and taking every proper step to enjoy communion with him, would be a defiling her; whereas it was the reverse of these that did it: from the whole it appears, that not only these excuses were idle and frivolous, but sinful; she slighted the means Christ made use of to awaken her, by calling and knocking; she sinned against light and knowledge, sleeping on, when she knew it was the voice of her beloved; she acted a disingenuous part in inviting Christ into his garden, and then presently fell asleep; and then endeavoured to shift the blame from herself, as if she was no ways culpable, but what was desired was either difficult, or unreasonable, or unlawful; she appears guilty of great ingratitude, and discovers the height of folly in preferring her present ease to the company of Christ.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Christ's answer. (Song 5:1) The disappointments of the church from he own folly. (Song 5:2-8) The excellences of Christ. (Song 5:9-16)

    Song 5:1 See how ready Christ is to accept the invitations of his people. What little good there is in us would be lost, if he did no preserve it to himself. He also invites his beloved people to eat an drink abundantly. The ordinances in which they honour him, are means of grace.

    Song 5:2-8 Churches and believers, by carelessness and security provoke Christ to withdraw. We ought to notice our spiritual slumber and distempers. Christ knocks to awaken us, knocks by his word an Spirit, knocks by afflictions and by our consciences; thus, Rev. 3:20 When we are unmindful of Christ, still he thinks of us. Christ's love to us should engage ours to him, even in the most self-denyin instances; and we only can be gainers by it. Careless souls put slight on Jesus Christ. Another could not be sent to open the door. Chris calls to us, but we have no mind, or pretend we have no strength, or we have no time, and think we may be excused. Making excuses is makin light of Christ. Those put contempt upon Christ, who cannot find in their hearts to bear a cold blast, or to leave a warm bed for him. Se the powerful influences of Divine grace. He put in his hand to unbol the door, as one weary of waiting. This betokens a work of the Spiri upon the soul. The believer's rising above self-indulgence, seeking by prayer for the consolations of Christ, and to remove every hinderanc to communion with him; these actings of the soul are represented by the hands dropping sweet-smelling myrrh upon the handles of the locks. But the Beloved was gone! By absenting himself, Christ will teach his people to value his gracious visits more highly. Observe, the sou still calls Christ her Beloved. Every desertion is not despair. Lord, believe, though I must say, Lord, help my unbelief. His words melte me, yet, wretch that I was, I made excuses. The smothering and stiflin of convictions will be very bitter to think of, when God opens ou eyes. The soul went in pursuit of him; not only prayed, but used means sought him in the ways wherein he used to be found. The watchme wounded me. Some refer it to those who misapply the word to awakene consciences. The charge to the daughters of Jerusalem, seems to mea the distressed believer's desire of the prayers of the feebles Christian. Awakened souls are more sensible of Christ's withdrawing than of any other trouble.

    Song 5:9-16 Even those who have little acquaintance with Christ, cannot but see amiable beauty in others who bear his image. There are hopes of those who begin to inquire concerning Christ and his perfections Christians, who are well acquainted with Christ themselves, should d all they can to make others know something of him. Divine glory make him truly lovely in the eyes of all who are enlightened to discer spiritual things. He is white in the spotless innocence of his life ruddy in the bleeding sufferings he went through at his death. Thi description of the person of the Beloved, would form, in the figurativ language of those times, a portrait of beauty of person and of grace of manners; but the aptness of some of the allusions may not appear to us He shall come to be glorified in his saints, and to be admired in all that believe. May his love constrain us to live to his glory __________________________________________________________________


    Original Hebrew

    פשׁטתי 6584 את 853 כתנתי 3801 איככה 349 אלבשׁנה 3847 רחצתי 7364 את 853 רגלי 7272 איככה 349 אטנפם׃ 2936


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET