King James Bible Adam Clarke Bible Commentary Martin Luther's Writings Wesley's Sermons and Commentary Neurosemantics Audio / Video Bible Evolution Cruncher Creation Science Vincent New Testament Word Studies KJV Audio Bible Family videogames Christian author Godrules.NET Main Page Add to Favorites Godrules.NET Main Page




Bad Advertisement?

News & Reviews:
  • World News
  • Movie Reviews
  • Book Search

    Are you a Christian?

    Online Store:
  • Your Own eBook/eBay Business
  • Visit Our eBay Store

    Automated eBook Business



  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - 1 John 3:12


    CHAPTERS: 1 John 1, 2, 3, 4, 5     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS - FOCHT   |   VIDEO: BIB - COMM


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB

    LXX- Greek Septuagint - 1 John 3:12

    ου 3756 καθως 2531 καιν 2535 εκ 1537 του 3588 πονηρου 4190 ην 2258 5713 και 2532 εσφαξεν 4969 5656 τον 3588 αδελφον 80 αυτου 846 και 2532 χαριν 5484 τινος 5101 εσφαξεν 4969 5656 αυτον 846 οτι 3754 τα 3588 εργα 2041 αυτου 846 πονηρα 4190 ην 2258 5713 τα 3588 δε 1161 του 3588 αδελφου 80 αυτου 846 δικαια 1342

    Douay Rheims Bible

    Not as Cain, who was of the wicked one, and killed his brother. And wherefore did he kill him? Because his own works were wicked: and his brother's just.

    King James Bible - 1 John 3:12

    Not as Cain, who was of that wicked one, and slew his brother. And wherefore slew he him? Because his own works were evil, and his brother's righteous.

    World English Bible

    unlike Cain, who was of the evil one, and killed his brother. Why did he kill him? Because his works were evil, and his brother's righteous.

    Early Church Father Links

    Npnf-102 iv.XV.7 Pg 5, Npnf-102 iv.XVIII.51 Pg 11, Npnf-107 iv.viii Pg 44, Npnf-108 ii.XLIX.2 Pg 31

    World Wide Bible Resources


    1John 3:12

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-03 vi.iv.vii Pg 10
    Gen. iv. 15; 24.



    Npnf-201 iii.xi.xxiv Pg 5
    Of the commentary on Genesis, only some fragments from the first and third books are extant, together with some extracts (ἐκλογαί), and seventeen homilies (nearly complete) in the Latin translation of Rufinus (see Lommatzsch’s ed., Vol. VIII.). Eight of the books, Eusebius tells us, were written in Alexandria, and they must, of course, have been begun after the commencement of the commentary on John. Jerome (according to Rufinus, Apol. II. 20) gave the number of the book as thirteen (though in his catalogue mentioned in the previous note, he speaks of fourteen), and said that the thirteenth discussed Gen. iv. 15; and in his Contra Cels. VI. 49 Origen speaks of his work upon Genesis “from the beginning of the book up to” V. 1. We may therefore conclude that the commentary covered only the early chapters of Genesis. The homilies, however, discuss brief passages taken from various parts of the book.

    of which there are twelve in all, he states that not only the preceding eight had been composed at Alexandria, but also those on the first twenty-five Psalms1965

    1965 Origen’s writings on the Psalms comprised a complete commentary (cf. Jerome’s Ep. ad Augustinum, §20; Migne’s ed.; Ep. 112), brief notes (“quod Enchiridion ille vocabat,” see Migne’s edition of Jerome’s works, Vol. VIII. 821, and compare the entire Breviarium in Psalmos which follows, and which doubtless contains much of Origen’s work; see Smith and Wace, IV. p. 108) and homilies. Of these there are still extant numerous fragments in Greek, and nine complete homilies in the Latin version of Rufinus (printed by Lommatzsch in Vols. XI.–XIII.). The catalogue of Jerome mentions forty-six books of notes on the Psalms and 118 homilies. The commentary on the 26th and following Psalms seem to have been written after leaving Alexandria (to judge from Eusebius’ statement here).

    and on Lamentations.1966

    1966 There are extant some extracts (ἐκλογαί) of Origen’s expositions of the book of Lamentations, which are printed by Lommatzsch, XIII. 167–218. They are probably from the commentary which Eusebius tells us was written before Origen left Alexandria, and five books of which were extant in his time. The catalogue of Jerome also mentions five books.

    Of these last five volumes have reached us.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 172.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.iv Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ii Pg 20
    Gen. iv. 1–7, especially in the LXX.; comp. Heb. xi. 4.

    Noah also, uncircumcised—yes, and inobservant of the SabbathGod freed from the deluge.1155

    1155


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 82.1


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 3

    VERSE 	(12) - 

    Ge 4:4-15,25 Heb 11:4 Jude 1:11


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET