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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Philemon 1:1


    CHAPTERS: 1     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Philemon 1:1

    παυλος 3972 δεσμιος 1198 χριστου 5547 ιησου 2424 και 2532 τιμοθεος 5095 ο 3588 αδελφος 80 φιλημονι 5371 τω 3588 αγαπητω 27 και 2532 συνεργω 4904 ημων 2257

    Douay Rheims Bible

    Paul, a prisoner of Christ Jesus, and Timothy, a brother: to Philemon, our beloved and fellow labourer;

    King James Bible - Philemon 1:1

    Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer,

    World English Bible

    Paul, a prisoner of Christ Jesus, and Timothy our brother, to Philemon, our beloved fellow worker,

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-07 ix.viii.iv Pg 7, Npnf-109 xix.xviii Pg 5, Npnf-111 vii.xxxii Pg 39, Npnf-112 v.xiii Pg 9, Npnf-113 v.vi.ii Pg 2, Npnf-212 ii.iv.iv Pg 10

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Philemon 1:1

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 v.ii.iii Pg 2
    Comp. Philem. 8; 9.

    upon me first to exhort you that ye would all run together in accordance with the will of God. For even Jesus Christ, our inseparable life, is the [manifested] will of the Father; as also bishops, settled everywhere to the utmost bounds [of the earth], are so by the will of Jesus Christ.


    Anf-01 v.ii.iii Pg 4
    Comp. Philem. 8; 9.

    upon me first to exhort you that ye would run together in accordance with the will of God. For even Jesus Christ does all things according to the will of the Father, as He Himself declares in a certain place, “I do always those things that please Him.”513

    513


    Anf-02 iii.i Pg 6.1
    The following interesting and eloquent Epistle is anonymous, and we have no clue whatever as to its author. For a considerable period after its publication in 1592, it was generally ascribed to Justin Martyr. In recent times Otto has inserted it among the works of that writer, but Semisch and others contend that it cannot possibly be his. In dealing with this question, we depend entirely upon the internal evidence, no statement as to the authorship of the Epistle having descended to us from antiquity. And it can scarcely be denied that the whole tone of the Epistle, as well as special passages which it contains, points to some other writer than Justin. Accordingly, critics are now for the most part agreed that it is not his, and that it must be ascribed to one who lived at a still earlier date in the history of the Church. Several internal arguments have been brought forward in favour of this opinion. Supposing chap. xi. to be genuine, it has been supported by the fact that the writer there styles himself “a disciple of the apostles.” But there is great suspicion that the two concluding chapters are spurious; and even though admitted to be genuine, the expression quoted evidently admits of a different explanation from that which implies the writer’s personal acquaintance with the apostles: it might, indeed, be adopted by one even at the present day. More weight is to be attached to those passages in which the writer speaks of Christianity as still being a new thing in the world. Expressions to this effect occur in several places (chap. i., ii., ix.), and seem to imply that the author lived very little, if at all, after the apostolic age. There is certainly nothing in the Epistle which is inconsistent with this opinion; and we may therefore believe, that in this beautiful composition we possess a genuine production of some apostolic man who lived not later than the beginning of the second century.


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 1

    VERSE 	(1) - 

    :9


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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