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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - James 3:2


    CHAPTERS: James 1, 2, 3, 4, 5     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

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    King James Bible - James 3:2

    For in many things we offend all. If any man offend not in word, the same is a perfect man, and able also to bridle the whole body.

    World English Bible

    For in many things we all stumble. If anyone doesn't stumble in word, the same is a perfect man, able to bridle the
    whole body also.

    Douay-Rheims - James 3:2

    For in many things we all offend. If any man offend not in word, the same is a perfect man. He is able also with a bridle to lead about the
    whole body.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    For in many things we all offend. If any man offendeth not in word, the same is a perfect man, able also to bridle the
    whole body.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    πολλα
    4183 γαρ 1063 πταιομεν 4417 5719 απαντες 537 ει 1487 τις 5100 εν 1722 λογω 3056 ου 3756 πταιει 4417 5719 ουτος 3778 τελειος 5046 ανηρ 435 δυνατος 1415 χαλιναγωγησαι 5468 5658 και 2532 ολον 3650 το 3588 σωμα 4983

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (2) -
    1Ki 8:46 2Ch 6:36 Pr 20:9 Ec 7:20 Isa 64:6 Ro 3:10; 7:21

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 3:2

    Porque todos ofendemos en muchas cosas. Si alguno no ofende en palabra, ste es varn perfecto, que tambin puede con freno gobernar todo el cuerpo.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - James 3:2

    Verse 2. In many things we offend all.] ptaiomen apantev? We all
    stumble or trip. Dr. Barrow very properly observes: "As the general course of life is called a way, and particular actions steps, so going on in a regular course of right action is walking uprightly; and acting amiss, tripping or stumbling." There are very few who walk so closely with God, and inoffensively with men, as never to stumble; and although it is the privilege of every follower of God to be sincere and without offense to the day of Christ, yet few of them are so. Were this unavoidable, it would be useless to make it a subject of regret; but as every man may receive grace from his God to enable him to walk in every respect uprightly, it is to be deplored that so few live up to their privileges. Some have produced these words as a proof that "no man can live without sinning against God; for James himself, a holy apostle speaking of himself, all the apostles, and the whole Church of Christ, says, In many things we offend all." This is a very bad and dangerous doctrine; and, pushed to its consequences, would greatly affect the credibility of the whole Gospel system. Besides, were the doctrine as true as it is dangerous and false, it is foolish to ground it upon such a text; because St. James, after the common mode of all teachers, includes himself in his addresses to his hearers. And were we to suppose that where he appears by the use of the plural pronoun to include himself, he means to be thus understood, we must then grant that himself was one of those many teachers who were to receive a great condemnation, James iii. 1; that he was a horse-breaker, because he says, "we put bits in the horses' mouths, that they may obey us," ver. 3; that his tongue was a world of iniquity, and set on fire of hell, for he says, "so is the tongue among our members," ver. 6; that he cursed men, "wherewith curse we men, ver. 9. No man possessing common sense could imagine that James, or any man of even tolerable morals, could be guilty of those things. But some of those were thus guilty to whom he wrote; and to soften his reproofs, and to cause them to enter the more deeply into their hearts, he appears to include himself in his own censure; and yet not one of his readers would understand him as being a brother delinquent.

    Offend not in word, the same is a perfect man] To understand this properly we must refer to the caution St. James gives in the preceding verse: Be not many masters or teachers - do not affect that for which you are not qualified, because in your teaching, not knowing the heavenly doctrine, ye may sin against the analogy of faith. But, says he, if any man offend not, ou ptaiei, trip not, en logw, in doctrine, teaching the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, the same is teleiov anhr, a man fully instructed in Divine things: How often the term logov, which we render word, is used to express doctrine, and the doctrine of the Gospel, we have seen in many parts of the preceding comment. And how often the word teleiov, which we translate perfect, is used to signify an adult Christian, one thoroughly instructed in the doctrines of the Gospel, may be seen in various parts of St. Paul's writings. See among others, 1 Cor. ii. 6; xiv. 20; Ephesians iv. 13; Phil. iii. 15; Col. iv. 12; Heb. v. 14. The man, therefore, who advanced no false doctrine, and gave no imperfect view of any of the great truths of Christianity; that man proved himself thereby to be thoroughly instructed in Divine things; to be no novice, and consequently, among the many teachers, to be a perfect master, and worthy of the sacred vocation.

    Able also to bridle the whole body.] Grotius, by body, believed that the Church of Christ was intended; and this the view we have taken of the preceding clauses renders very probable. But some think the passions and appetites are intended; yet these persons understand not offending in word as referring simply to well guarded speech. Now how a man's cautiousness in what he says can be a proof that he has every passion and appetite under control, I cannot see. Indeed, I have seen so many examples of a contrary kind, that I can have no doubt of the impropriety of this exposition. But it is objected "that calinagwgew signifies to check, turn, or rule with a bridle; and is never applied to the government of the Church of Christ." Probably not: but St. James is a very peculiar writer; his phraseology, metaphors, and diction in general, are different from all the rest of the New Testament writers, so as to have scarcely any thing in common with them, but only that he writes in Greek. The sixth verse is supposed to be a proof against the opinion of Grotius; but I conceive that verse to belong to a different subject, which commences ver. 3.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 2. For in many things we offend all , etc.] Or we all offend, slip and fall; no man lives without sin; in many, in most, if not in all things, a good man himself does, he sins; and this extends to the most solemn services, and best works of a good man; there is sin in his holy things, imperfections in all his performances; his righteousnesses are as filthy rags; hence no man can be justified by his works before God, nor is any man perfect in this life, so as to be without sin in himself: the apostle includes himself in this account, and that not out of modesty merely, or in a complaisant way, but as matter of fact, and what he found in himself, and observed in the conduct of his life: and now this is given as a reason why persons should not be anxious of teaching others, since in many instances, in common speech and conversation, men are apt to offend, and much more in a work which requires a multitude of words; or why men should be careful how they charge, censure, and reprove others, in a rash, furious, and unchristian manner; since they themselves are in the body, and may be tempted, and are attended with many infirmities, slips, and falls in common life. If any man offend not in word ; from slips and falls in general, the apostle proceeds to the slips of the tongue, and to the use and abuse of that member; and his sense is, that if a man has so much guard upon himself, and such a command over his tongue, and so much wisdom to use it, as to give no offence by it, to his fellow creatures, and fellow Christians: the same is a perfect man ; not that he is perfect in himself, and without sin, that is denied before; unless this is considered as a mere hypothesis, and by way of concession; that could there be found out a man that never, for instance, offends in word in anyone part of life, that man may be allowed, and be set down to be a perfect man; but no such man is to be found, and therefore none perfect: but rather the sense is, that he who in common is so careful of his speech, as not to offend his brethren, may be looked upon as a sincere and truly religious man; (see James 1:26) or he may be accounted a wise and prudent man, such an one as in ( James 3:13) he is not a babe in understanding, a child in conduct, but a grown man; at full age; a perfect man; in which sense the word is used in ( 1 Corinthians 2:6 Hebrews 5:14). And able also to bridle the whole body ; either to govern the whole body, the church, to teach a society of Christians, and to feed them with knowledge, and with understanding; or rather, as he appears to be able to bridle that member of the body, the tongue, so likewise to be able, through the grace of God, to keep under the whole body, that sin shall not reign in it, or the lusts of it be in common obeyed.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-12 - We are taught to dread an
    unruly tongue, as one of the greatest evils The affairs of mankind are thrown into confusion by the tongues of men Every age of the world, and every condition of life, private or public affords examples of this. Hell has more to do in promoting the fire of the tongue than men generally think; and whenever men's tongues ar employed in sinful ways, they are set on fire of hell. No man can tam the tongue without Divine grace and assistance. The apostle does no represent it as impossible, but as extremely difficult. Other sin decay with age, this many times gets worse; we grow more froward an fretful, as natural strength decays, and the days come on in which we have no pleasure. When other sins are tamed and subdued by the infirmities of age, the spirit often grows more tart, nature being drawn down to the dregs, and the words used become more passionate That man's tongue confutes itself, which at one time pretends to ador the perfections of God, and to refer all things to him; and at anothe time condemns even good men, if they do not use the same words an expressions. True religion will not admit of contradictions: how man sins would be prevented, if men would always be consistent! Pious an edifying language is the genuine produce of a sanctified heart; an none who understand Christianity, expect to hear curses, lies boastings, and revilings from a true believer's mouth, any more tha they look for the fruit of one tree from another. But facts prove tha more professors succeed in bridling their senses and appetites, than i duly restraining their tongues. Then, depending on Divine grace, let u take heed to bless and curse not; and let us aim to be consistent in our words and actions.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    πολλα
    4183 γαρ 1063 πταιομεν 4417 5719 απαντες 537 ει 1487 τις 5100 εν 1722 λογω 3056 ου 3756 πταιει 4417 5719 ουτος 3778 τελειος 5046 ανηρ 435 δυνατος 1415 χαλιναγωγησαι 5468 5658 και 2532 ολον 3650 το 3588 σωμα 4983

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    2. Offend (ptaiomen). Lit.,
    stumble, as Rev. Compare ch. ii. 10.

    To bridle. See on ch. i. 26.



    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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