Job 34:37 - For he addeth rebellion unto his sin, he clappeth his hands among us, and multiplieth his words against God. "> Job 34:37, bible study, online bible, bible commentary, bible study tools, bible verse, king james bible, adam clarke, john wesley, wesley's bible, sermons, commentary, bible reference, niv, nasb, new american standard, nkjv, king james, asv, kjv">
King James Bible Adam Clarke Bible Commentary Martin Luther's Writings Wesley's Sermons and Commentary Neurosemantics Audio / Video Bible Evolution Cruncher Creation Science Vincent New Testament Word Studies KJV Audio Bible Family videogames Christian author Godrules.NET Main Page Add to Favorites Godrules.NET Main Page




Bad Advertisement?

News & Reviews:
  • World News
  • Movie Reviews
  • Book Search

    Are you a Christian?

    Online Store:
  • Your Own eBook/eBay Business
  • Visit Our eBay Store

    Automated eBook Business



  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Job 34:37


    CHAPTERS: Job 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - РУССКАЯ БИБЛИЯ - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

    King James Bible - Job 34:37

    For he addeth rebellion unto his sin, he clappeth his hands among us, and multiplieth his words against God.

    World English Bible

    For he adds rebellion to his sin. He claps his hands among us, and multiplies his
    words against God."

    Douay-Rheims - Job 34:37

    Because he addeth blasphemy upon his sins, let him be tied fast in the mean time amongst us : and then let him provoke God to judgment with his speeches.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    For he addeth rebellion to his sin, he clappeth his hands among us, and multiplieth his
    words against God.

    Original Hebrew

    כי
    3588 יסיף 3254 על 5921  חטאתו 2403  פשׁע 6588  בינינו 996 יספוק 5606 וירב 7235 אמריו 561 לאל׃ 410

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (37) -
    1Sa 15:23 Isa 1:19,20

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 34:37

    Porque a su pecado aņadiķ impiedad; bate las manos entre nosotros, y contra Dios multiplica sus palabras.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Job 34:37

    Verse 37. He addeth rebellion unto his sin ] An ill-natured, cruel, and unfounded assertion, borne out by nothing which Job had ever said or intended; and indeed, more severe than the most inveterate of his friends (so called) had ever spoken. Mr. Good makes this virulent conclusion still more virulent and uncharitable, by translating thus: - "For he would add to his transgressions apostasy; He would clap his hands in the midst of us: Yea, he would tempest his words up to God." There was no need of adding a caustic here; the words in the tamest translation are tart enough. Though Elihu began well and tolerantly, he soon got into the spirit, and under the mistake, of those who had preceded him in this "tempest of words." ON ver. 30 I have referred to the case of Hegiage, governor of the Babylonian Irak, under the caliph Abdul Malec. When Hegiage was informed that the people were in a state of mutiny because of his oppressive government, before they broke out into open acts of hostility, he mounted on an eminence, and thus harangued them: - "God has given me dominion over you; if I exercise it with severity, think not that by putting me to death your condition will be mended. From the manner in which you live you must be always ill- treated, for God has many executors of his justice; and when I am dead he will send you another, who will probably execute his orders against you with more rigour. Do you wish your prince to be moderate and merciful? Then exercise righteousness, and be obedient to the laws. Consider that your own conduct is the cause of the good or evil treatment which you receive from him. A prince may be compared to a mirror; all that you see in him is the reflection of the objects which you present before him." The people immediately dropped their weapons, and quietly returned to their respective avocations. This man was one of the most valiant, eloquent, and cruel rulers of his time; he lived towards the close of the 7th century of the Christian era. He is said to have put to death 120,000 people; and to have had 50,000 in his prisons at the time of his decease. Yet this man was capable of generous actions. The following anecdote is given by the celebrated Persian poet Jami, in his Baharistan: - Hegiage, having been separated from his attendants one day in the chase, came to a place where he found an Arab feeding his camels. The camels starting at his sudden approach, the Arab lifted up his head, and seeing a man splendidly arrayed, became incensed, and said, Who is this who with his fine clothes comes into the desert to frighten my camels? The curse of Good light upon him! The governor, approaching the Arab, saluted him very civilly, with the salaam, Peace be unto thee! The Arab, far from returning the salutation, said, I wish thee neither peace, nor any other blessing of God.

    Hegiage, without seeming to heed what he had said, asked him very civilly "to give him a little water to drink." The Arab in a surly tone, answered, If thou desirest to drink, take the pains to alight, and draw for thyself; for I am neither thy companion nor thy slave. The governor accordingly alighted, and having drank, asked the Arab, "Whom dost thou think the greatest and most excellent of men?" The prophet sent by God, said the Arab, and thou mayest burst with spleen. "And what thinkest thou of Aaly?" returned Hegiage. No tongue can declare his excellence, said the Arab. "What," asked Hegiage, "is thy opinion of the caliph Abdul Malec?" I believe him to be a very bad prince, replied the Arab. "For what reason?" said Hegiage. Because, said the Arab, he hath sent us for governor the most execrable wretch under heaven. Hegiage, finding himself thus characterized, was silent; but his attendants coming up, he rejoined them, and ordered them to bring the Arab with them. The next day Hegiage ordered him to be set at table with himself, and bade him "eat freely." The Arab, ere he tasted, said his usual grace, "God grant that the end of this repast may be no worse than the beginning!" While at meat the governor asked him, "Dost thou recollect the discourse we had together yesterday?" The Arab replied, God prosper thee in all things! but as to the secret of yesterday, take heed that thou disclose it not to-day. "I will not," said Hegiage; "but thou must choose one of these two things; either acknowledge me for thy master, and I will retain thee about my person; or else I will send thee to Abdul Malec, and tell him what thou hast said of him." There is a third course, replied the Arab, preferable to those two. "Well, what is that?" said the governor. Why, send me back to the desert, and pray God that we may never see each other's face again. Cruel and vindictive as Hegiage was, he could not help being pleased with the frankness and courage of the man; and not only forgave him the preceding insults but ordered him 10,000 pieces of silver, and sent him back to the desert, according to his wish.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 31-37 - When we reprove for what is amiss, we must direct to what is good Job's friends would have had him own himself a wicked man. Let wil only oblige him to own that he spoke unadvisedly with his lips. Let us in giving reproof, not make a matter worse than it is. Elihu direct Job to humble himself before God for his sins, and to accept the punishment. Also to pray to God to discover his sins to him. A good ma is willing to know the worst of himself; particularly, unde affliction, he desires to be told wherefore God contends with him. It is not enough to be sorry for our sins, but we must go and sin no more And if we are affectionate children, we shall love to speak with ou Father, and to tell him all our mind. Elihu reasons with Job concernin his discontent under affliction. We are ready to think every thing tha concerns us should be just as we would have it; but it is no reasonable to expect this. Elihu asks whether there was not sin an folly in what Job said. God is righteous in all his ways, and holy in all his works, Ps 145:17. The believer saith, Let my Saviour, my wis and loving Lord, choose every thing for me. I am sure that will be wisest, and the best for his glory and my good __________________________________________________________________


    Original Hebrew

    כי 3588 יסיף 3254 על 5921  חטאתו 2403  פשׁע 6588  בינינו 996 יספוק 5606 וירב 7235 אמריו 561 לאל׃ 410


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET