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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Philippians 1:2


    CHAPTERS: Philippians 1, 2, 3, 4     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS - FOCHT   |   VIDEO: BIB - COMM

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB


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    King James Bible - Philippians 1:2

    Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.

    World English Bible

    Grace to you, and peace from God, our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ.

    Douay-Rheims - Philippians 1:2

    Grace be unto you, and peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Grace be to you, and peace, from God our Father and from the Lord Jesus Christ.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    χαρις
    5485 υμιν 5213 και 2532 ειρηνη 1515 απο 575 θεου 2316 πατρος 3962 ημων 2257 και 2532 κυριου 2962 ιησου 2424 χριστου 5547

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (2) -
    Ro 1:7 2Co 1:2 1Pe 1:2

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 1:2

    Gracia y paz tengis de Dios nuestro Padre y del Seor Jess, el Cristo.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Philippians 1:2

    Verse 2.
    Grace be unto you] See on Rom. i. 7.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 2.
    Grace be unto you , etc.] This form of salutation is used by the apostle in all his epistles; (see Gill on Romans 1:7); Ver. 3. I thank my God , etc.] After the inscription and salutation follows a thanksgiving, the object of which is God; to whom thanks is to be given at the remembrance of his name, and the perfections of his nature, and for all his mercies, temporal and spiritual. The apostle expresses his propriety and interest in him, calling him my God; thereby distinguishing him from all others, the nominal and fictitious gods of the Gentiles, and the idols and lusts of men's hearts; he was the God whom he served in the Gospel, by whom he was sent, and from whom he received all his possessions, and to whom he was accountable. He had a special, particular, covenant interest in him, had knowledge of it, and faith in it; and therefore could draw nigh to God with freedom, use confidence, plead promises, expect favours, and do all he did, whether in a way of prayer, or praise in faith, and therefore was acceptable unto God. This work of thanksgiving he was often employed in on account of these Philippians, even, says he, upon every remembrance of you ; that is, as often as I remember you, or make mention of you to God at the throne of grace, it being a customary thing with the apostle to mention by name the several churches, the care of which was upon him, in his prayers to God; (see Romans 1:9 Ephesians 1:16 1 Thessalonians 1:2); and so he used to mention this church; and whenever he did, it was with thankfulness. The Arabic version reads it, for, or concerning all your remembrance; meaning of himself, and as if the sense was, that he gave thanks to God for their remembrance of him at all times, and particularly at that time, by sending him relief in his present circumstances. But the former sense is preferable.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-7 - The highest honour of the most eminent
    ministers is, to be servants of Christ. And those who are not really saints on earth, never will be saints in heaven. Out of Christ, the best saints are sinners, an unable to stand before God. There is no peace without grace. Inwar peace springs from a sense of Divine favour. And there is no grace an peace but from God our Father, the fountain and origin of all blessings. At Philippi the apostle was evil entreated, and saw littl fruit of his labour; yet he remembers Philippi with joy. We must than our God for the graces and comforts, gifts and usefulness of others, a we receive the benefit, and God receives the glory. The work of grac will never be perfected till the day of Jesus Christ, the day of his appearance. But we may always be confident God will perform his goo work, in every soul wherein he has really begun it by regeneration though we must not trust in outward appearances, nor in any thing but new creation to holiness. People are dear to their ministers, when the receive benefit by their ministry. Fellow-sufferers in the cause of God should be dear one to another.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    χαρις
    5485 υμιν 5213 και 2532 ειρηνη 1515 απο 575 θεου 2316 πατρος 3962 ημων 2257 και 2532 κυριου 2962 ιησου 2424 χριστου 5547

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    2.
    Grace - peace. The combination of the Greek and Oriental salutations spiritualized: grace expressing God's love to man, and peace the condition resulting therefrom.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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