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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Titus 1:16


    CHAPTERS: Titus 1, 2, 3     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS - FOCHT   |   VIDEO: BIB - COMM

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - РУССКАЯ БИБЛИЯ

    King James Bible - Titus 1:16

    They profess that they know God; but in works they deny him, being abominable, and disobedient, and unto every good work reprobate.

    World English Bible

    They profess that they know God, but by their works they deny him, being abominable, disobedient, and unfit for any good
    work.

    Douay-Rheims - Titus 1:16

    They profess that they know God: but in their works they deny him; being abominable, and incredulous, and to every good
    work reprobate.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    They profess that they know God; but in works they deny him, being abominable, and disobedient, and to every good
    work reprobate.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    θεον
    2316 ομολογουσιν 3670 5719 ειδεναι 1492 5760 τοις 3588 δε 1161 εργοις 2041 αρνουνται 720 5736 βδελυκτοι 947 οντες 5607 5752 και 2532 απειθεις 545 και 2532 προς 4314 παν 3956 εργον 2041 αγαθον 18 αδοκιμοι 96

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (16) -
    Nu 24:16 Isa 29:13; 48:1; 58:2 Eze 33:31 Ho 8:2,3 Ro 2:18-24

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 1:16

    Profesan conocer a Dios; mas con los hechos lo niegan, siendo abominables y rebeldes, y reprobados para toda buena obra.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Titus 1:16

    Verse 16. They profess that they know
    God] He still speaks concerning the unbelieving Jews, the seducing teachers, and those who had been seduced by their bad doctrine. None were so full of pretensions to the knowledge of the true God as the Jews. They would not admit that any other people could have this knowledge; nor did they believe that God ever did or ever would reveal himself to any other people; they supposed that to give the law and the prophets to the Gentiles would be a profanation of the words of God. Hence they became both proud, uncharitable, and intolerant; and in this disposition they continue till the present day.

    But in works they deny him] Their profession and practice were at continual variance. Full of a pretended faith, while utterly destitute of those works by which a genuine faith is accredited and proved. Dio Cassius represents Caesar as saying of his mutinous soldiers: onoma rwmaiwn econtav, erga de keltwn drwntav. "Having the name of Romans, while they had the manners of the Gauls." How near are those words to the saying of the apostle! Being abominable] bdeluktoi. This word sometimes refers to unnatural lusts.

    And disobedient] apeiqeiv? Unpersuadable, unbelieving, and consequently disobedient. Characters remarkably applicable to the Jews through all their generations.

    Unto every good work reprobate.] adokimoi? Adulterate; like bad coin, deficient both in the weight and goodness of the metal, and without the proper sterling stamp; and consequently not current. If they did a good work, they did not do it in the spirit in which it should be performed.

    They had the name of God's people; but they were counterfeit. The prophet said; Reprobate silver shall men call them.

    1. THOUGH the principal part of this chapter, and indeed of the whole epistle, may be found in nearly the same words in the First Epistle to Timothy, yet there are several circumstances here that are not so particularly noted in the other; and every minister of Christ will do well to make himself master of both; they should be carefully registered in his memory, and engraven on his heart.

    2. The truth, which is according to godliness, in reference to eternal life, should be carefully regarded. The substantial knowledge of the truth must have faith for its foundation, godliness for its rule, and eternal life for its object and end. He who does not begin well, is never likely to finish fair.

    He who does not refer every thing to eternity, is never likely to live either well or happily in time.

    3. There is one subject in this chapter not sufficiently attended to by those who have the authority to appoint men to ecclesiastical offices; none should be thus appointed who is not able, by sound doctrine, both to exhort and convince the gainsayers. The powers necessary for this are partly natural, partly gracious, and partly acquired. 1. If a man have not good natural abilities, nothing but a miracle from heaven can make him a proper preacher of the Gospel; and to make a man a Christian minister, who is unqualified for any function of civil life, is sacrilege before God. 2.

    If the grace of God do not communicate ministerial qualifications, no natural gifts, however splendid, can be of any avail. To be a successful Christian minister, a man must feel the worth of immortal souls in such a way as God only can show it, in order to spend and be spent in the work.

    He who has never passed through the travail of the soul in the work of regeneration in his own heart, can never make plain the way of salvation to others. 3. He who is employed in the Christian ministry should cultivate his mind in the most diligent manner; he can neither learn nor know too much. If called of God to be a preacher, (and without such a call he had better be a galley slave,) he will be able to bring all his knowledge to the assistance and success of his ministry. If he have human learning, so much the better; if he be accredited, and appointed by those who have authority in the Church, it will be to his advantage; but no human learning, no ecclesiastical appointment, no mode of ordination, whether Popish, Episcopal, Protestant, or Presbyterian, can ever supply the Divine unction, without which he never can convert and build up the souls of men. The piety of the flock must be faint and languishing when it is not animated by the heavenly zeal of the pastor; they must be blind if he be not enlightened; and their faith must be wavering when he can neither encourage nor defend it.

    4. In consequence of the appointment of improper persons to the Christian ministry, there has been, not only a decay of piety, but also a corruption of religion. No man is a true Christian minister who has not grace, gifts, and fruit; if he have the grace of God, it will appear in his holy life and godly conversation. If to this he add genuine abilities, he will give full proof of his ministry; and if he give full proof of his ministry, he will have fruit; the souls of sinners will be converted to God through his preaching, and believers will be built up on their most holy faith. How contemptible must that man appear in the eyes of common sense, who boasts of his clerical education, his sacerdotal order, his legitimate authority to preach, administer the Christian sacraments, &c., while no soul is benefited by his ministry! Such a person may have legal authority to take tithes, but as to an appointment from God, he has none; else his word would be with power, and his preaching the means of salvation to his perishing hearers.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 16. They profess that they know God , etc.] That there is a God; that there is but one, only, true, and living God, the God of Israel, as professed by the Jews; and that this God is Father, Son, and Spirit, as believed by the Christians: for the persons the apostle speaks of were judaizing Christians.

    Yet this knowledge was but notional; it lay in theory and profession only; they had not a spiritual experimental knowledge of God in Christ, which only has eternal life connected with it: but in works they deny him . The Syriac, Arabic, and Ethiopic versions read, in their own works; they were not professed, but practical atheists; they owned there was a God, and boasted of their knowledge of him; but their lives and conversations showed that they had no true knowledge of him, and that the fear of him was not before their eyes; these gave the lie to their profession; they practically denied that faith they professed to hold, and the power of godliness, of which they had the form. Being abominable ; in the sight of God, however esteemed by men; and notwithstanding the vizor and mask of sanctity and religion they put on, which could not screen them from the omniscience of God, who will one day declare he knows them not, and will bid them depart from him, being workers of iniquity. And disobedient ; to God; to his law, and Gospel; to his ministers and churches; and even to parents and civil magistrates; for of this cast were the false teachers, and their followers, as maybe learned from many passages. And unto every good work reprobate : or unaccustomed, unused to them, as the Arabic version renders it; or rather without judgment, and understanding, concerning them; there was no good in them, nor was it in them to do good; to do good they had no knowledge, nor any inclination; they were unfit for it, and had not a capacity to perform it; they were not good themselves, and therefore could not do good; the tree must first be made good, ere its fruit will be good; they were without Christ, and without his Spirit, and grace, without which no man can do anything that is spiritually good; they had no true faith, and therefore what they did was sinful; they had neither right principles, from which, nor right ends to which they acted, and therefore were not qualified for the performance of good works; which require that men should be good men, created in Christ Jesus, be believers in him, and have principles of truth and love, and views to the glory of God.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 10-16 - False teachers are described. Faithful ministers must oppose such in good time, that their folly being made manifest, they may go no furthe They had a base end in what they did; serving a worldly interest unde pretence of religion: for the love of money is the root of all evil Such should be resisted, and put to shame, by sound doctrine from the Scriptures. Shameful actions, the reproach of heathens, should be fa from Christians; falsehood and lying, envious craft and cruelty, bruta and sensual practices, and idleness and sloth, are sins condemned eve by the light of nature. But Christian meekness is as far from cowardl passing over sin and error, as from anger and impatience. And thoug there may be national differences of character, yet the heart of man in every age and place is deceitful and desperately wicked. But the sharpest reproofs must aim at the good of the reproved; and soundnes in the faith is most desirable and necessary. To those who are defile and unbelieving, nothing is pure; they abuse, and turn things lawfu and good into sin. Many profess to know God, yet in their lives den and reject him. See the miserable state of hypocrites, such as have form of godliness, but are without the power; yet let us not be s ready to fix this charge on others, as careful that it does not appl to ourselves __________________________________________________________________


    Greek Textus Receptus


    θεον
    2316 ομολογουσιν 3670 5719 ειδεναι 1492 5760 τοις 3588 δε 1161 εργοις 2041 αρνουνται 720 5736 βδελυκτοι 947 οντες 5607 5752 και 2532 απειθεις 545 και 2532 προς 4314 παν 3956 εργον 2041 αγαθον 18 αδοκιμοι 96

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    16. They profess (oJmologou
    sin). Better, confess. See on 2 Corinthians ix. 13, and comp. 1 Tim. vi. 12. Not loudly and publicly profess (as Huther), but confess as opposed to deny (John i. 20); comp. Hebrews xi. 13; Rom. x. 9, 10.

    Abominable (bdeluktoi). N.T.o . Class. LXX, Proverbs. xvii. 15; Sir. xli. 5; 2 Macc. i. 27. See on, bdelugma abomination, Matt. xxiv. 15, and comp. Apoc. xvii. 4, 5; xxi. 27. The kindred verb, bdelussesqai abhor, Rom. ii. 22; Apoc. xxi. 8.

    Reprobate (adokimoi). See on Rom. i. 28; 1 Cor. ix. 27, and comp. 2 Tim. iii. 8. The phrase reprobate unto every good work, N.T.o .


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    1:16 {They profess} (homologousin). Present active indicative of homologew, common verb (homou, legw) as in #Ro 10:10f. eidenai (know) is second perfect active infinitive of oida in indirect assertion. {By their works} (tois ergois). Instrumental case. {They deny} (arnountai). Present middle of arneomai, old verb, common in the Gospels and the Pastoral Epistles (#1Ti 5:8; Tit 2:12; 2Ti 2:12). {Abominable} (bdeluktoi). Verbal adjective from bdelussomai. Only in LXX and here. {Disobedient} (apeitheis). See #Ro 1:30. {Reprobate} (adokimoi). See on 1Co 9:27; Ro 1:28.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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