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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - 2 Samuel 22:32


    CHAPTERS: 2 Samuel 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB - COMM


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB

    LXX- Greek Septuagint - 2 Samuel 22:32

    τις 5100 5101 ισχυρος 2478 πλην 4133 κυριου 2962 και 2532 τις 5100 5101 κτιστης εσται 2071 5704 πλην 4133 του 3588 θεου 2316 ημων 2257

    Douay Rheims Bible

    Who is God but the Lord: and who is strong but our God?

    King James Bible - 2 Samuel 22:32

    For who is God, save the LORD? and who is a
    rock, save our God?

    World English Bible

    For who is God, besides Yahweh? Who is a
    rock, besides our God?

    World Wide Bible Resources


    2Samuel 22:32

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 13.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 146.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.i Pg 34
    Deut. xxxii. 39.

    —even the same “who createth evil and maketh peace;”3509

    3509


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xi Pg 19
    Deut. xxxii. 39.

    We have already made good the Creator’s claim to this twofold character of judgment and goodness5696

    5696 See above in book ii. [cap. xi. p. 306.]

    —“killing in the letter” through the law, and “quickening in the Spirit” through the Gospel. Now these attributes, however different they be, cannot possibly make two gods; for they have already (in the prevenient dispensation of the Old Testament) been found to meet in One.5697

    5697 Apud unum recenseri prævenerunt.

    He alludes to Mosesveil, covered with which “his face could not be stedfastly seen by the children of Israel.”5698

    5698


    Anf-03 v.viii.ix Pg 10
    Deut. xxxii. 39.

    Why reproach the flesh with those conditions which wait for God, which hope in God, which receive honour from God, which He succours? I venture to declare, that if such casualties as these had never befallen the flesh, the bounty, the grace, the mercy, (and indeed) all the beneficent power of God, would have had no opportunity to work.7351

    7351 Vacuisset.



    Anf-03 v.viii.xxviii Pg 10
    Isa. xxxviii. 12, 13; 16. The very words, however, occur not in Isaiah, but in 1 Sam. ii. 6; Deut. xxxii. 39.

    Certainly His making alive is to take place after He has killed. As, therefore, it is by death that He kills, it is by the resurrection that He will make alive. Now it is the flesh which is killed by death; the flesh, therefore, will be revived by the resurrection. Surely if killing means taking away life from the flesh, and its opposite, reviving, amounts to restoring life to the flesh, it must needs be that the flesh rise again, to which the life, which has been taken away by killing, has to be restored by vivification.


    Anf-01 v.xv.iii Pg 3
    Isa. xliv. 6.

    concerning the Father of the universe, do also speak of our Lord Jesus Christ. “A Son,” they say, has been given to us, on whose shoulder the government is from above; and His name is called the Angel of great counsel, Wonderful, Counsellor, the strong and mighty God.”1226

    1226


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxi Pg 2
    Isa. xliv. 6.

    On this account, then, as I before said, God did not, when He sent Moses to the Hebrews, mention any name, but by a participle He mystically teaches them that He is the one and only God. “For,” says He; “I am the Being;” manifestly contrasting Himself, “the Being,” with those who are not,2549

    2549 Literally, “with the not-beings.”

    that those who had hitherto been deceived might see that they were attaching themselves, not to beings, but to those who had no being. Since, therefore, God knew that the first men remembered the old delusion of their forefathers, whereby the misanthropic demon contrived to deceive them when he said to them, “If ye obey me in transgressing the commandment of God, ye shall be as gods,” calling those gods which had no being, in order that men, supposing that there were other gods in existence, might believe that they themselves could become gods. On this account He said to Moses, “I am the Being,” that by the participle “being” He might teach the difference between God who is and those who are not.2550

    2550 Literally, “between the God being and not-beings.”

    Men, therefore, having been duped by the deceiving demon, and having dared to disobey God, were cast out of Paradise, remembering the name of gods, but no longer being taught by God that there are no other gods. For it was not just that they who did not keep the first commandment, which it was easy to keep, should any longer be taught, but should rather be driven to just punishment. Being therefore banished from Paradise, and thinking that they were expelled on account of their disobedience only, not knowing that it was also because they had believed in the existence of gods which did not exist, they gave the name of gods even to the men who were afterwards born of themselves. This first false fancy, therefore, concerning gods, had its origin with the father of lies. God, therefore, knowing that the false opinion about the plurality of gods was burdening the soul of man like some disease, and wishing to remove and eradicate it, appeared first to Moses, and said to him, “I am He who is.” For it was necessary, I think, that he who was to be the ruler and leader of the Hebrew people should first of all know the living God. Wherefore, having appeared to him first, as it was possible for God to appear to a man, He said to him, “I am He who is;” then, being about to send him to the Hebrews, He further orders him to say, “He who is hath sent me to you.”


    Anf-02 v.ii.ix Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.v.vi Pg 4
    Matt. xvi. 26. Some omit this quotation.

    Him I seek, who died for us: Him I desire, who rose again for our sake. This is the gain which is laid up for me. Pardon me, brethren: do not hinder me from living, do not wish to keep me in a state of death;863

    863 Literally, “to die.”

    and while I desire to belong to God, do not ye give me over to the world. Suffer me to obtain pure light: when I have gone thither, I shall indeed be a man of God. <index subject1="Imitators" subject2="of Christ" title="76" id="v.v.vi-p5.1"/>Permit me to be an imitator of the passion of my God. If any one has Him within himself, let him consider what I desire, and let him have sympathy with me, as knowing how I am straitened.


    Anf-03 v.ix.xviii Pg 5
    Isa. xlv. 5, 18; xliv. 6.

    who shows us that He is the only God, but in company with His Son, with whom “He stretcheth out the heavens alone.”7988

    7988


    Anf-03 iv.iv.iv Pg 7
    Isa. xliv. 8 et seqq.

    says, “Ye are witnesses whether there is a God except Me.” “And they who mould and carve out at that time were not: all vain! who do that which liketh them, which shall not profit them!” And that whole ensuing discourse sets a ban as well on the artificers as the worshippers:  the close of which is, “Learn that their heart is ashes and earth, and that none can free his own soul.” In which sentence David equally includes the makers too. “Such,” says he, “let them become who make them.”184

    184


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxvi Pg 4
    Isa. xliv. 8.

    of no other God; especially when He was swearing to this very point, that besides himself there was absolutely no God?  Is it then of swearing falsely that you convict3037

    3037 Deprehendis.

    Him, or of swearing a vain oath? But it is not possible for him to appear to have sworn falsely, when he was ignorant, as you say he was, that there was another God.  For when he swore by that which he knew, he really committed no perjury. But it was not a vain oath for him to swear that there was no other God.  It would indeed be a vain oath, if there had been no persons who believed that there were other Gods, like the worshippers of idols then, and the heretics of the present day.  Therefore He swears by Himself, in order that you may believe God, even when He swears that there is besides Himself no other God at all. But you have yourself, O Marcion, compelled God to do this. For even so early as then were you foreseen. Hence, if He swears both in His promises and His threatenings, and thus extorts3038

    3038 Extorquens.

    faith which at first was difficult, nothing is unworthy of God which causes men to believe in God. But (you say) God was even then mean3039

    3039 Pusillus.

    enough in His very fierceness, when, in His wrath against the people for their consecration of the calf, He makes this request of His servant Moses: “Let me alone, that my wrath may wax hot against them, and that I may consume them; and I will make of thee a great nation.”3040

    3040


    Anf-01 ix.ii.vi Pg 11
    Isa. xlv. 5, 6, Isa. xlvi. 9.

    <index subject1="Grief, evil spirits said by Valentinus to derive their origin from" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.3"/>They further teach that the spirits of wickedness derived their origin from grief. <index subject1="Cosmocrator, the" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.4"/>Hence the devil, whom they also call Cosmocrator (the ruler of the world), and the demons, and the angels, and every wicked spiritual being that exists, found the source of their existence. They represent the Demiurge as being the son of that mother of theirs (Achamoth), and Cosmocrator as the creature of the Demiurge. Cosmocrator has knowledge of what is above himself, because he is a spirit of wickedness; but the Demiurge is ignorant of such things, inasmuch as he is merely animal. Their mother dwells in that place which is above the heavens, that is, in the intermediate abode; the Demiurge in the heavenly place, that is, in the hebdomad; but the Cosmocrator in this our world. The corporeal elements of the world, again, sprang, as we before remarked, from bewilderment and perplexity, as from a more ignoble source. Thus the earth arose from her state of stupor; water from the agitation caused by her fear; air from the consolidation of her grief; while fire, producing death and corruption, was inherent in all these elements, even as they teach that ignorance also lay concealed in these three passions.


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxx Pg 9
    Ex. xx. 5; Isa. xlv. 5, 6.

    Such are the falsehoods which these people invent.


    Anf-03 v.vi.xxi Pg 8
    Isa. xlv. 5; xlvi. 9.

    But for all that, he at least was aware that he had not himself existed before. He understood, therefore, that he had been created, and that there must be a creator of a creature of some sort or other.  How happens it, then, that he seemed to himself to be the only being, notwithstanding his uncertainty, and although he had, at any rate, some suspicion of the existence of some creator?


    Anf-03 v.vii.xxiv Pg 6
    Isa. xlv. 5.

    And when in another passage he says, in like manner, “Before me there was no God,”7273

    7273


    Anf-03 v.ix.xviii Pg 4
    Isa. xlv. 5.

    And when He Himself makes this declaration, He denies not the Son, but says that there is no other God; and the Son is not different from the Father. Indeed, if you only look carefully at the contexts which follow such statements as this, you will find that they nearly always have distinct reference to the makers of idols and the worshippers thereof, with a view to the multitude of false gods being expelled by the unity of the Godhead, which nevertheless has a Son; and inasmuch as this Son is undivided and inseparable from the Father, so is He to be reckoned as being in the Father, even when He is not named. The fact is, if He had named Him expressly, He would have separated Him, saying in so many words: “Beside me there is none else, except my Son.” In short He would have made His Son actually another, after excepting Him from others.  Suppose the sun to say, “I am the Sun, and there is none other besides me, except my ray,” would you not have remarked how useless was such a statement, as if the ray were not itself reckoned in the sun? He says, then, that there is no God besides Himself in respect of the idolatry both of the Gentiles as well as of Israel; nay, even on account of our heretics also, who fabricate idols with their words, just as the heathen do with their hands; that is to say, they make another God and another Christ. When, therefore, He attested His own unity, the Father took care of the Son’s interests, that Christ should not be supposed to have come from another God, but from Him who had already said, “I am God and there is none other beside me,”7987

    7987


    Anf-03 v.ix.xviii Pg 5
    Isa. xlv. 5, 18; xliv. 6.

    who shows us that He is the only God, but in company with His Son, with whom “He stretcheth out the heavens alone.”7988

    7988


    Anf-03 v.ix.xx Pg 4
    Isa. xlv. 5.

    so in the Gospel they simply keep in view the Lord’s answer to Philip, “I and my Father are one;”8007

    8007


    Anf-01 ix.ii.vi Pg 11
    Isa. xlv. 5, 6, Isa. xlvi. 9.

    <index subject1="Grief, evil spirits said by Valentinus to derive their origin from" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.3"/>They further teach that the spirits of wickedness derived their origin from grief. <index subject1="Cosmocrator, the" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.4"/>Hence the devil, whom they also call Cosmocrator (the ruler of the world), and the demons, and the angels, and every wicked spiritual being that exists, found the source of their existence. They represent the Demiurge as being the son of that mother of theirs (Achamoth), and Cosmocrator as the creature of the Demiurge. Cosmocrator has knowledge of what is above himself, because he is a spirit of wickedness; but the Demiurge is ignorant of such things, inasmuch as he is merely animal. Their mother dwells in that place which is above the heavens, that is, in the intermediate abode; the Demiurge in the heavenly place, that is, in the hebdomad; but the Cosmocrator in this our world. The corporeal elements of the world, again, sprang, as we before remarked, from bewilderment and perplexity, as from a more ignoble source. Thus the earth arose from her state of stupor; water from the agitation caused by her fear; air from the consolidation of her grief; while fire, producing death and corruption, was inherent in all these elements, even as they teach that ignorance also lay concealed in these three passions.


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxx Pg 9
    Ex. xx. 5; Isa. xlv. 5, 6.

    Such are the falsehoods which these people invent.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 58.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 16.1


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 22

    VERSE 	(32) - 

    De 32:31,39 1Sa 2:2 Isa 44:6,8; 45:5,6,21 Jer 10:6,7,16


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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