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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Luke 17:27


    CHAPTERS: Luke 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Luke 17:27

    ησθιον 2068 5707 επινον 4095 5707 εγαμουν 1060 5707 εξεγαμιζοντο 1547 5712 αχρι 891 ης 3739 ημερας 2250 εισηλθεν 1525 5627 νωε 3575 εις 1519 την 3588 κιβωτον 2787 και 2532 ηλθεν 2064 5627 ο 3588 κατακλυσμος 2627 και 2532 απωλεσεν 622 5656 απαντας 537

    Douay Rheims Bible

    They did eat and drink, they married wives, and were given in marriage, until the
    day that Noe entered into the ark: and the flood came and destroyed them all.

    King James Bible - Luke 17:27

    They did eat, they drank, they married wives, they were given in marriage, until the
    day that Noe entered into the ark, and the flood came, and destroyed them all.

    World English Bible

    They ate, they drank, they married, they were given in marriage, until the
    day that Noah entered into the ship, and the flood came, and destroyed them all.

    Early Church Father Links

    Npnf-101 vii.1.CLXIV Pg 41, Npnf-114 v.xxvii Pg 5, Npnf-114 vi.xxvii Pg 5, Npnf-206 v.CXXIII Pg 86

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Luke 17:27

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xiii Pg 20.1


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xv Pg 20
    Luke xii. 20.

    and similar to this, that of the rich man, who was clothed in purple and who fared sumptuously, and the indigent Lazarus;3556

    3556


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xiii Pg 20.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.v Pg 33.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 116.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxviii Pg 31
    Luke xii. 16–20.

    It was just in the like manner that the king Hezekiah heard from Isaiah the sad doom of his kingdom, when he gloried, before the envoys of Babylon,4649

    4649 Apud Persas.

    in his treasures and the deposits of his precious things.4650

    4650


    Anf-03 vi.iv.vi Pg 13
    Luke xii. 16–20.



    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxxv Pg 3
    Luke xvi. 19, etc.

    that Dives knew Lazarus after death, and Abraham in like manner, and that each one of these persons continued in his own proper position, and that [Dives] requested Lazarus to be sent to relieve him—[Lazarus], on whom he did not [formerly] bestow even the crumbs [which fell] from his table. [He tells us] also of the answer given by Abraham, who was acquainted not only with what respected himself, but Dives also, and who enjoined those who did not wish to come into that place of torment to believe Moses and the prophets, and to receive3289

    3289 With Massuet and Stieren, we here supply esse.

    the preaching of Him who was3290

    3290 Some read resurgeret, and others resurrexerit; we deem the former reading preferable.

    to rise again from the dead. By these things, then, it is plainly declared that souls continue to exist that they do not pass from body to body, that they possess the form of a man, so that they may be recognised, and retain the memory of things in this world; moreover, that the gift of prophecy was possessed by Abraham, and that each class [of souls] receives a habitation such as it has deserved, even before the judgment.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iii Pg 13
    Luke xvi. 19.


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xiii Pg 7
    i.e., Lazarus, Luke xvi. 19–31.

    in Hades,259

    259 “Apud inferos,” used clearly here by Tertullian of a place of happiness. Augustine says he never finds it so used in Scripture. See Ussher’s “Answer to a Jesuit” on the Article, “He descended into hell.” [See Elucid. X. p. 59, supra.]

    (attaining refreshment in Abraham’s bosom) and the rich man, (on the other hand, set in the torment of fire) compensate, by an answerable retribution, their alternate vicissitudes of evil and good.  There are certain gift-days, which with some adjust the claim of honour, with others the debt of wages. “Now, then,” you say, “I shall receive back what is mine, or pay back what is another’s.” If men have consecrated for themselves this custom from superstition, why do you, estranged as you are from all their vanity, participate in solemnities consecrated to idols; as if for you also there were some prescript about a day, short of the observance of a particular day, to prevent your paying or receiving what you owe a man, or what is owed you by a man? Give me the form after which you wish to be dealt with.  For why should you skulk withal, when you contaminate your own conscience by your neighbour’s ignorance?  If you are not unknown to be a Christian, you are tempted, and you act as if you were not a Christian against your neighbour’s conscience; if, however, you shall be disguised withal,260

    260 i.e., if you are unknown to be a Christian: “dissimulaberis.” This is Oehler’s reading; but Latinius and Fr. Junis would read “Dissimulaveris,” ="if you dissemble the fact” of being a Christian, which perhaps is better.

    you are the slave of the temptation. At all events, whether in the latter or the former way, you are guilty of being “ashamed of God.”261

    261 So Mr. Dodgson renders very well.

    But “whosoever shall be ashamed of Me in the presence of men, of him will I too be ashamed,” says He, “in the presence of my Father who is in the heavens.”262

    262


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiv Pg 38
    Luke xvi. 19–31.

    For this passage, so far as its letter goes, comes before us abruptly; but if we regard its sense and purport, it naturally4839

    4839 Ipsum.

    fits in with the mention of John wickedly slain, and of Herod, who had been condemned by him for his impious marriage.4840

    4840 Suggillati Herodis male maritati.

    It sets forth in bold outline4841

    4841 Deformans.

    the end of both of them, the “torments” of Herod and the “comfort” of John, that even now Herod might hear that warning:  “They have there Moses and the prophets, let them hear them.”4842

    4842


    Anf-03 iv.xi.ix Pg 14
    Luke xvi. 23, 24.

    By these features also the souls of the martyrs under the altar are distinguished and known. The soul indeed which in the beginning was associated with Adam’s body, which grew with its growth and was moulded after its form proved to be the germ both of the entire substance (of the human soul) and of that (part of) creation.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiv Pg 45
    Luke xvi. 23.

    and from a distance too, except to a superior height, and from the said distance all up through the vast immensity of height and depth. It must therefore be evident to every man of intelligence who has ever heard of the Elysian fields, that there is some determinate place called Abraham’s bosom, and that it is designed for the reception of the souls of Abraham’s children, even from among the Gentiles (since he is “the father of many nations,” which must be classed amongst his family), and of the same faith as that wherewithal he himself believed God, without the yoke of the law and the sign of circumcision. This region, therefore, I call Abraham’s bosom. Although it is not in heaven, it is yet higher than hell,4846

    4846 Sublimiorem inferis. [Elucidation VIII.]

    and is appointed to afford an interval of rest to the souls of the righteous, until the consummation of all things shall complete the resurrection of all men with the “full recompense of their reward.”4847

    4847


    Anf-03 iv.xi.vii Pg 3
    Luke xvi. 23, 24.

    Do you suppose that this end of the blessed poor man and the miserable rich man is only imaginary? Then why the name of Lazarus in this narrative, if the circumstance is not in (the category of) a real occurrence? But even if it is to be regarded as imaginary, it will still be a testimony to truth and reality. For unless the soul possessed corporeality, the image of a soul could not possibly contain a finger of a bodily substance; nor would the Scripture feign a statement about the limbs of a body, if these had no existence. But what is that which is removed to Hades1535

    1535 Ad inferna. [See p. 59, supra.]

    after the separation of the body; which is there detained; which is reserved until the day of judgment; to which Christ also, on dying, descended? I imagine it is the souls of the patriarchs. But wherefore (all this), if the soul is nothing in its subterranean abode?  For nothing it certainly is, if it is not a bodily substance. For whatever is incorporeal is incapable of being kept and guarded in any way; it is also exempt from either punishment or refreshment. That must be a body, by which punishment and refreshment can be experienced. Of this I shall treat more fully in a more fitting place. Therefore, whatever amount of punishment or refreshment the soul tastes in Hades, in its prison or lodging,1536

    1536 Diversorio.

    in the fire or in Abraham’s bosom, it gives proof thereby of its own corporeality. For an incorporeal thing suffers nothing, not having that which makes it capable of suffering; else, if it has such capacity, it must be a bodily substance. For in as far as every corporeal thing is capable of suffering, in so far is that which is capable of suffering also corporeal.1537

    1537 Compare De Resur. Carnis, xvii. There is, however, some variation in Tertullian’s language on this subject.  In his Apol. xlviii. he speaks as if the soul could not suffer when separated from the body. See also his De Testimonio Animæ, ch. iv., p. 177, supra; and see Bp. Kaye, p. 183.



    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 8
    Deut. vi. 12.

    But setting before them blessings and curses, He also says: “Blessings shall be yours, if ye obey the commandments of the Lord your God, whatsoever I command you this day, and do not wander from the way which I have commanded you, to go and serve other gods whom ye know not.”8234

    8234


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 32
    Deut. viii. 12–14.

    In similar terms, when king Hezekiah became proud of his treasures, and gloried in them rather than in God before those who had come on an embassy from Babylon,4012

    4012 Tertullian says, ex Perside.

    (the Creator) breaks forth4013

    4013 Insilit.

    against him by the mouth of Isaiah:  “Behold, the days come when all that is in thine house, and that which thy fathers have laid up in store, shall be carried to Babylon.”4014

    4014


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxix Pg 52
    Comp. Deut. viii. 12–14.

    Some places there were in Jerusalem where to teach; other places outside Jerusalem whither to retire5064

    5064


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 32
    Deut. viii. 12–14.

    In similar terms, when king Hezekiah became proud of his treasures, and gloried in them rather than in God before those who had come on an embassy from Babylon,4012

    4012 Tertullian says, ex Perside.

    (the Creator) breaks forth4013

    4013 Insilit.

    against him by the mouth of Isaiah:  “Behold, the days come when all that is in thine house, and that which thy fathers have laid up in store, shall be carried to Babylon.”4014

    4014


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxix Pg 52
    Comp. Deut. viii. 12–14.

    Some places there were in Jerusalem where to teach; other places outside Jerusalem whither to retire5064

    5064


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 17

    VERSE 	(27) - 

    Lu 12:19,20; 16:19-23 De 6:10-12; 8:12-14 1Sa 25:36-38 Job 21:9-13


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