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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 1 Corinthians 4:9


    CHAPTERS: 1 Corinthians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21

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    King James Bible - 1 Corinthians 4:9

    For I think that God hath set forth us the apostles last, as it were appointed to death: for we are made a spectacle unto the world, and to angels, and to men.

    World English Bible

    For, I think that God has displayed us, the apostles, last of all, like
    men sentenced to death. For we are made a spectacle to the world, both to angels and men.

    Douay-Rheims - 1 Corinthians 4:9

    For I think that God hath set forth us apostles, the last, as it were
    men appointed to death: we are made a spectacle to the world, and to angels, and to men.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    For I think that God hath set forth us the apostles last, as it were appointed to death: for we are made a spectacle to the world, and to angels, and to
    men.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    δοκω
    1380 5719 V-PAI-1S-C γαρ 1063 CONJ οτι 3754 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM θεος 2316 N-NSM ημας 2248 P-1AP τους 3588 T-APM αποστολους 652 N-APM εσχατους 2078 A-APM απεδειξεν 584 5656 V-AAI-3S ως 5613 ADV επιθανατιους 1935 A-APM οτι 3754 CONJ θεατρον 2302 N-NSN εγενηθημεν 1096 5675 V-AOI-1P τω 3588 T-DSM κοσμω 2889 N-DSM και 2532 CONJ αγγελοις 32 N-DPM και 2532 CONJ ανθρωποις 444 N-DPM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (9) -
    1Co 15:30-32 2Co 1:8-10; 4:8-12; 6:9 Php 1:29,30 1Th 3:3

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 4:9

    Porque a lo que pienso, Dios nos ha mostrado a nosotros, los apstoles, como los postreros, como a sentenciados a muerte; porque somos hechos espectculo al mundo, y a los ngeles, y a los hombres.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 1 Corinthians 4:9

    Verse 9.
    God hath set forth us the apostles last] This whole passage is well explained by Dr. Whitby. "Here the apostle seems to allude to the Roman spectacles, thv twn qhriomacwn, kai monomaciav androfonou, that of the Bestiarii and the gladiators, where in the morning men were brought upon the theatres to fight with wild beasts, and to them was allowed armour to defend themselves and smite the beasts that assailed them; but in the meridian or noon-day spectacles the gladiators were brought forth naked, and without any thing to defend themselves from the sword of the assailant; and he that then escaped was only kept for slaughter to another day, so that these men might well be called epiqanatioi, men appointed for death; and this being the last appearance on the theater for that day, they are said here to be set forth escatoi, the last." Of these two spectacles Seneca speaks thus, Epist. vii.: "In the morning men are exposed to lions and bears; at mid-day to their spectators; those that kill are exposed to one another; the victor is detained for another slaughter; the conclusion of the fight is death. The former fighting compared to this was mercy; now it is mere butchery: they have nothing to cover them; their whole body is exposed to every blow, and every stroke produces a wound," &c.

    We are made a spectacle] oti qeatron egenhqhmen, We are exhibited on the theater to the world; we are lawful booty to all mankind, and particularly to the men of the world, who have their portion in this life.

    Angels are astonished at our treatment, and so are the more considerate part of men. Who at that time would have coveted the apostolate?


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 9. For I think that God hath set forth us the apostles last , etc.] Meaning either in time, in respect to the prophets and patriarchs under the former dispensation; and to the apostles, who were sent forth by Christ when on earth; when he, and Barnabas, and others, had received their mission since his ascension; or in state and condition, who though they were set in the first place in the church, yet were the least in the esteem of men; and were treated as the most mean, vile, and abject of creatures; were set or showed forth to public view, and made a gazing stock by reproaches and afflictions. And as it were appointed to death ; were continually exposed unto it; were in death oft, always carrying about with them the dying of the Lord Jesus; and were all the day long killed for his sake; all which the apostle not only thought, but believed, were not casual things, fortuitous events, but the determinations and appointments of God; and were brought about in his wise providence to answer some valuable ends, which made him the more easy under them, and reconciled unto them. For we are made a spectacle unto the world, and to angels, and to men .

    The word translated spectacle signifies a theatre; and the allusion is to the Roman theatres, in which various exercises were performed, for the gratification of the numerous spectators, who were placed around in a proper distance to behold; and not so much to the gladiators who fought, in such places, for the diversion of the multitude, as to those unhappy persons who were cast to the wild beasts, let loose upon them to devour them; which horrid barbarities were beheld by the surrounding company with great pleasure and satisfaction; and such a spectacle were the apostles in their sufferings and persecutions to the whole world, distinguished into angels and men. By angels may be meant the devils, who stirred up the princes of this world against the apostles, to persecute and afflict them; than which nothing was a greater pleasure to these envious and malicious spirits: though good angels may be also included, as witnesses of the faith, courage, and constancy of the saints, and as comforters of them in all their tribulations; but evil angels seem chiefly designed: and by men are meant wicked men, who are as much pleased to behold the barbarities and butcheries committed upon the people of God, as the Romans in their theatres were to see the tragical scenes that were acted there.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 7-13 - We have no reason to be proud; all we have, or are, or do, that is good, is owing to the free and rich grace of God. A sinner snatche from destruction by sovereign grace alone, must be very absurd an inconsistent, if proud of the free gifts of God. St. Paul sets fort his own circumstances, ver. 9 Allusion is made to the cruel spectacle in the Roman games; where men were forced to cut one another to pieces to divert the people; and where the victor did not escape with his life, though he should destroy his adversary, but was only kept for another combat, and must be killed at last. The thought that many eye are upon believers, when struggling with difficulties or temptations should encourage constancy and patience. "We are weak, but ye ar strong." All Christians are not alike exposed. Some suffer greate hardships than others. The apostle enters into particulars of their sufferings. And how glorious the charity and devotion that carried the through all these hardships! They suffered in their persons an characters as the worst and vilest of men; as the very dirt of the world, that was to be swept away: nay, as the offscouring of all things, the dross of all things. And every one who would be faithful in Christ Jesus, must be prepared for poverty and contempt. Whatever the disciples of Christ suffer from men, they must follow the example, an fulfil the will and precepts of their Lord. They must be content, with him and for him, to be despised and abused. It is much better to be rejected, despised, and ill used, as St. Paul was, than to have the good opinion and favour of the world. Though cast off by the world a vile, yet we may be precious to God, gathered up with his own hand, an placed upon his throne.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    δοκω
    1380 5719 V-PAI-1S-C γαρ 1063 CONJ οτι 3754 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM θεος 2316 N-NSM ημας 2248 P-1AP τους 3588 T-APM αποστολους 652 N-APM εσχατους 2078 A-APM απεδειξεν 584 5656 V-AAI-3S ως 5613 ADV επιθανατιους 1935 A-APM οτι 3754 CONJ θεατρον 2302 N-NSN εγενηθημεν 1096 5675 V-AOI-1P τω 3588 T-DSM κοσμω 2889 N-DSM και 2532 CONJ αγγελοις 32 N-DPM και 2532 CONJ ανθρωποις 444 N-DPM

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    9. For. Introducing a contrast between the inflated self-satisfaction of the Corinthians and the actual condition of their
    teachers. You have come to reign, but the case is very different with us, for I think, etc.

    Hath set forth (apedeixen). Only twice in Paul's writings; here, and 2 Thessalonians ii. 4. See on approved, Acts ii. 22. In classical Greek used of publishing a law; shewing forth, and therefore naming or creating a king or military leader; bringing forward testimony; displaying treasure, etc. So here, exhibiting.

    Last (escatouv). As in Mark ix. 35, of relative rank and condition: as having in men's eyes the basest lot of all.

    Appointed to death (epiqanatiouv). Rev., doomed. Only here in the New Testament. Probably an allusion to the practice of exposing condemned criminals in the amphitheatre to fight with beasts or with one another as gladiators. The gladiators, on entering the arena, saluted the presiding officer with the words Nos morituri salutamus, We who are to die greet you. Tertullian paraphrases this passage, God hath chosen us apostles last as beast-fighters. "The vast range of an amphitheatre under the open sky, well represents the magnificent vision of all created things, from men up to angels, gazing on the dreadful death-struggle; and then the contrast of the selfish Corinthians sitting by unconcerned and unmoved by the awful spectacle" (Stanley). For a similar image of spectators watching the contest in the arena, see Heb. xii. 1. Compare also 1 Corinthians xv. 32.

    Spectacle (qeatron). Primarily, a theatre; then that which is exhibited. Compare the kindred verb qeatrizomenoi being made a gazing-stock, Heb. x. 33.

    Unto the world (tw kosmw). The universe, a sense not usual with Paul; compare ch. viii. 4. The words to angels and to men define world; so that the rendering of the American Rev. is preferable, both to angels and men. Principal Edwards remarks: "This comprehensive use of the word kosmos is remarkable, because, on the one hand, it is an advance on the Old-Testament conception of two separate spheres of existence, heaven and earth, not comprehended under any wider designation; and, on the other, because it differs from the meaning attached to the word among the Greeks; inasmuch as the apostle uses it of the spiritual as well as the physical totality of existence." The spiritual oneness of the universe is a conception eminently characteristic of St. Paul; but it is foreshadowed by Plato. "Communion and friendship and orderliness and temperance and justice bind together heaven and earth and gods and men; and this universe is therefore called kosmos or order; not disorder or misrule" ("Gorgias," 508).


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    4:9 {Hath set forth us the apostles last} (hemas tous apostolous escatous apedeixen). The first aorist active indicative of apodeiknumi, old verb to show, to expose to view or exhibit (Herodotus), in technical sense (cf. #2Th 2:4) for gladiatorial show as in eqeriomacesa (#1Co 15:32). In this grand pageant Paul and other apostles come last (escatous, predicate accusative after apedeixen) as a grand finale. {As men doomed to die} (hws epiqanatious). Late word, here alone in N.T. The LXX (Bel and the Dragon 31) has it for those thrown daily to the lions. Dionysius of Halicarnassus (_A.R_. vii. 35) uses it of those thrown from the Tarpeian Rock. The gladiators would say _morituri salutamus_. All this in violent contrast to the kingly Messianic pretensions of the Corinthians. {A spectacle} (qeatron). Cf. #Heb 11:33-40. The word, like our theatre, means the place of the show (#Ac 19:29,31). qen, it means the spectacle shown there (qeama or qea), and, as here, the man exhibited as the show like the verb qeatrizomenoi, made a spectacle (#Heb 10:33). Sometimes it refers to the spectators (qeatai) like our "house" for the audience. Here the spectators include "the world, both to angels and menw (twi kosmwi kai aggelois kai anqrwpois), dative case of personal interest.


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    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21

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