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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 2 Corinthians 1:8


    CHAPTERS: 2 Corinthians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24

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    King James Bible - 2 Corinthians 1:8

    For we would not, brethren, have you ignorant of our trouble which came to us in Asia, that we were pressed out of measure, above strength, insomuch that we despaired even of life:

    World English Bible

    For we don't desire to have you uninformed, brothers, concerning our affliction which happened to us in Asia, that we were weighed down exceedingly, beyond our
    power, so much that we despaired even of life.

    Douay-Rheims - 2 Corinthians 1:8

    For we would not have you ignorant,brethren, of our tribulation, which came to us in Asia, that we were pressed out of measure above our
    strength, so that we were weary even of life.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    For we would not, brethren, have you ignorant of our trouble which came to us in Asia, that we were pressed out of measure, above
    strength, so that we despaired even of life:

    Greek Textus Receptus


    ου
    3756 PRT-N γαρ 1063 CONJ θελομεν 2309 5719 V-PAI-1P υμας 5209 P-2AP αγνοειν 50 5721 V-PAN αδελφοι 80 N-VPM υπερ 5228 PREP της 3588 T-GSF θλιψεως 2347 N-GSF ημων 2257 P-1GP της 3588 T-GSF γενομενης 1096 5637 V-2ADP-GSF ημιν 2254 P-1DP εν 1722 PREP τη 3588 T-DSF ασια 773 N-DSF οτι 3754 CONJ καθ 2596 PREP υπερβολην 5236 N-ASF εβαρηθημεν 916 5681 V-API-1P υπερ 5228 PREP δυναμιν 1411 N-ASF ωστε 5620 CONJ εξαπορηθηναι 1820 5683 V-APN ημας 2248 P-1AP και 2532 CONJ του 3588 T-GSM ζην 2198 5721 V-PAN

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (8) -
    2Co 4:7-12 Ac 19:23-35 1Co 15:32; 16:9

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 1:8

    Porque, hermanos, no queremos que ignoris nuestra tribulacin que nos fue hecha en Asia; que (sobremanera) fuimos cargados ms all de nuestras fuerzas, de tal manera que estuvisemos en duda de la vida.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 2 Corinthians 1:8

    Verse 8. Our
    trouble which came to us in Asia] To what part of his history the apostle refers we know not: some think it is to the Jews lying in wait to kill him, Acts xx. 3; others, to the insurrection raised against him by Demetrius and his fellow craftsmen, Acts xix. 23; others, to his fighting with beasts at Ephesus, 1 Cor. xv. 32, which they understand literally; and others think that there is a reference here to some persecution which is not recorded in any part of the apostle's history.

    We were pressed out of measure, above strength] The original is exceedingly emphatic: kaq uperbolhn ebarhqhmen uper dunamin? we were weighed down beyond what is credible, even beyond what any natural strength could support. There is no part of St. Paul's history known to us which can justify these strong expressions, except his being stoned at Lystra; which if not what is here intended, the facts to which he refers are not on record. As Lystra was properly in Asia, unless he mean Asia Minor, and his stoning at Lystra did most evidently destroy his life, so that his being raised was an effect of the miraculous power of God; he might be supposed to refer to this. See the notes on Acts xiv. 19, &c. But it is very likely that the reference is to some terrible persecution which he had endured some short time before his writing this epistle; and with the outlines of which the Corinthians had been acquainted.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 8. For we would not, brethren, have you ignorant of our trouble , etc..] The apostle was very desirous that the Corinthians might be thoroughly acquainted with the trouble that had lately befallen them; partly because it would clearly appear from hence what reason he had to give thanks to God as he had done; and partly, that they might be encouraged to trust in God, when in the utmost extremity; but chiefly in order to remove a charge brought against him by the false apostles; who, because he had promised to come to Corinth, and as yet had not come, accused him of lightness and inconstancy, in as much as he had not kept his promise. Now to show that it was not owing to any such temper and disposition of mind in him, he would have them know, that though he sincerely intended a journey to them, yet was hindered from pursuing it, by a very great affliction which befell him: the place where this sore trouble came upon him, is expressed to be in Asia: some have thought it refers to all the troubles he met with in Asia, for the space of three years, whereby he was detained longer than he expected; but it seems as though some single affliction is here particularly designed: many interpreters have been of opinion, that the tumult raised by Demetrius at Ephesus is here meant, when Paul and his companions were in great danger of their lives, ( Acts 19:21-41), but this uproar being but for a day, could not be a reason why, as yet, he had not come to Corinth: it seems rather to be some other very sore affliction, and which lasted longer, that is not recorded in the Acts of the Apostles: the greatness of this trouble is set forth in very strong expressions, as that we were pressed out of measure . The affliction was as an heavy burden upon them, too heavy to bear; it was exceeding heavy, kay' uperbolhn , even to an hyperbole, beyond expression; and above strength , that is, above human strength, the strength of nature; and so the Syriac renders it, lyj m , above our strength; but not above the strength of grace, or that spiritual strength communicated to them, by which they were supported under it: the apostle adds, insomuch that we despaired even of life ; they were at the utmost loss, and in the greatest perplexity how to escape the danger of life; they greatly doubted of it; they saw no probability nor possibility, humanly speaking, of preserving it.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-11 - We are encouraged to come boldly to the
    throne of grace, that we ma obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need. The Lord is able to give peace to the troubled conscience, and to calm the ragin passions of the soul. These blessings are given by him, as the Fathe of his redeemed family. It is our Saviour who says, Let not your hear be troubled. All comforts come from God, and our sweetest comforts ar in him. He speaks peace to souls by granting the free remission of sins; and he comforts them by the enlivening influences of the Holy Spirit, and by the rich mercies of his grace. He is able to bind up the broken-hearted, to heal the most painful wounds, and also to give hop and joy under the heaviest sorrows. The favours God bestows on us, ar not only to make us cheerful, but also that we may be useful to others He sends comforts enough to support such as simply trust in and serv him. If we should be brought so low as to despair even of life, yet we may then trust God, who can bring back even from death. Their hope an trust were not in vain; nor shall any be ashamed who trust in the Lord Past experiences encourage faith and hope, and lay us under obligatio to trust in God for time to come. And it is our duty, not only to hel one another with prayer, but in praise and thanksgiving, and thereby to make suitable returns for benefits received. Thus both trials an mercies will end in good to ourselves and others.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    ου
    3756 PRT-N γαρ 1063 CONJ θελομεν 2309 5719 V-PAI-1P υμας 5209 P-2AP αγνοειν 50 5721 V-PAN αδελφοι 80 N-VPM υπερ 5228 PREP της 3588 T-GSF θλιψεως 2347 N-GSF ημων 2257 P-1GP της 3588 T-GSF γενομενης 1096 5637 V-2ADP-GSF ημιν 2254 P-1DP εν 1722 PREP τη 3588 T-DSF ασια 773 N-DSF οτι 3754 CONJ καθ 2596 PREP υπερβολην 5236 N-ASF εβαρηθημεν 916 5681 V-API-1P υπερ 5228 PREP δυναμιν 1411 N-ASF ωστε 5620 CONJ εξαπορηθηναι 1820 5683 V-APN ημας 2248 P-1AP και 2532 CONJ του 3588 T-GSM ζην 2198 5721 V-PAN

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    8. We would not have you ignorant. See on
    Rom. i. 13.

    Came to us in Asia. Rev., better, befell. The nature of the trouble is uncertain. The following words seem to indicate inward distress rather than trouble from without, such as he experienced at Ephesus.

    Were pressed out of measure (kaq uperbolhn ebarhqhmen). Rev., better, were weighed down, thus giving the etymological force of the verb, from barov burden. For out of measure, Rev, exceedingly; see on 1 Corinthians ii. 1.

    We despaired (exaporhqhnai). Only here and ch. iv. 8. From ejx out and out, and ajporew to be without a way of escape. See on did many things, Mark vi. 20.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    1:8 {Concerning our affliction} (huper tes qliyews hemwn). Manuscripts read also peri for in the _Koin_ huper (over) often has the idea of peri (around). Paul has laid down his philosophy of afflictions and now he cites a specific illustration in his own recent experience. {In Asia} (en asiai). Probably in Ephesus, but what it was we do not know whether sickness or peril. We do know that the disciples and the Asiarchs would not allow Paul to face the mob in the amphitheatre gathered by Demetrius (#Ac 20:30f.). In #Ro 16:4 Paul says that Prisca and Aquila laid down their necks for him, risked their very lives for him. It may have been a later plot to kill Paul that hastened his departure from Ephesus (#Ac 20:1). He had a trial so great that "we were weighed down exceedingly beyond our power" (kaq' huperbolen huper dunamin ebareqemen). Old verb from baros, weight, barus, weighty. First aorist passive indicative. See on 1Co 12:31 for kaq' huperbolen (cf. our hyperbole). It was beyond Paul's power to endure if left to himself. {Insomuch that we despaired even of life} (hwste exaporeqenai hemas kai tou zein). Usual clause of result with hwste and the infinitive. First aorist passive infinitive exaporeqenai, late compound for utter despair (perfective use of ex and at a complete loss, a privative and poros, way). There seemed no way out. {Of life} (tou zein). Ablative case of the articular infinitive, of living.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24

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