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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 2 Corinthians 10:1


    CHAPTERS: 2 Corinthians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

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    King James Bible - 2 Corinthians 10:1

    Now I Paul myself beseech you by the meekness and gentleness of Christ, who in presence am base among you, but being absent am bold toward you:

    World English Bible

    Now I Paul, myself, entreat you by the humility and gentleness of Christ; I who in your presence am lowly among you, but being absent am bold toward you.

    Douay-Rheims - 2 Corinthians 10:1

    Now I Paul myself beseech you, by the mildness and modesty of Christ, who in presence indeed am lowly among you, but being absent, am bold toward you.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Now I Paul myself beseech you, by the meekness and gentleness of Christ, who in presence am base among you, but being absent am bold towards you:

    Greek Textus Receptus


    αυτος
    846 P-NSM δε 1161 CONJ εγω 1473 P-1NS παυλος 3972 N-NSM παρακαλω 3870 5719 V-PAI-1S υμας 5209 P-2AP δια 1223 PREP της 3588 T-GSF πραοτητος 4236 N-GSF και 2532 CONJ επιεικειας 1932 N-GSF του 3588 T-GSM χριστου 5547 N-GSM ος 3739 R-NSM κατα 2596 PREP προσωπον 4383 N-ASN μεν 3303 PRT ταπεινος 5011 A-NSM εν 1722 PREP υμιν 5213 P-2DP απων 548 5752 V-PXP-NSM δε 1161 CONJ θαρρω 2292 5719 V-PAI-1S-C εις 1519 PREP υμας 5209 P-2AP

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (1) -
    1Co 16:21,22 Ga 5:2 2Th 3:17 Phm 1:9 Re 1:9

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 10:1

    ¶ Os ruego, sin embargo, yo Pablo, por la mansedumbre y modestia del Cristo, (que presente ciertamente soy bajo entre vosotros, mas ausente soy confiado con vosotros);

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 2 Corinthians 10:1

    Verse 1. I
    Paul myself beseech you by the meekness] Having now finished his directions and advices relative to the collection for the poor, he resumes his argument relative to the false apostle, who had gained considerable influence by representing St. Paul as despicable in his person, his ministry, and his influence. Under this obloquy the apostle was supported by the meekness and gentleness of Christ; and through the same heavenly disposition he delayed inflicting that punishment which, in virtue of his apostolical authority, he might have inflicted on him who had disturbed and laboured to corrupt the Christian Church.

    Who in presence am base among you, but being absent am bold toward you] He seems to quote these as the words of his calumniator, as if he had said; "This apostle of yours is a mere braggadocio; when he is among you, you know how base and contemptible he is; when absent, see how he brags and boasts." The word tapeinov, which we render base, signifies lowly, and, as some think, short of stature. The insinuation is, that when there was danger or opposition at hand, St. Paul acted with great obsequiousness, fearing for his person and authority, lest he should lose his secular influence. See the following verse.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 1. Now I Paul myself beseech you , etc..] The apostle having said what was necessary and proper to stir up the Corinthians to a liberal contribution for the poor saints at Jerusalem, returns to the vindication of himself against the false apostles; and earnestly entreats the members of this church, by the meekness and gentleness of Christ , not to regard their reproaches, and join with them in them; for did they but consider the meek and gentle deportment of Christ, so worthy of his and their imitation, they would see there was no reason to reflect on him for that part of his conduct, in which he followed his Lord and master; whose meekness was to be seen in the assumption of human nature, in the whole of his life and conversation, and in his sufferings and death; and his gentleness of Spirit to be observed in his coming into this world, not to judge and condemn it, but that the world might be saved; in bearing all indignities and insults, without being provoked to wrath and revenge; in rebuking his disciples for the severity of their spirits, declaring he came to save, and not take away the lives of men; in praying for his enemies, and in his silence under all the ill treatment he met with from the worst of men. As the apostle had this excellent example before him, which served both to regulate his conduct, and support him under the hard measures he met with, so he was desirous to direct others to the observance of it, which might be a check upon the ill usage of him.

    He here speaks of himself in the language of his adversaries, who meant by these characters to expose him to scorn and contempt: I Paul myself; whose name the false teachers played upon, it signifying little; and he being of little stature, they reproached him for it, and would insinuate, that as his name was little, and his person mean, his bodily presence weak, and his speech contemptible, that he had a little soul, was a man of small knowledge, mean parts, and a very insignificant minister. Now it is as if the apostle should say, I am not ashamed of my name, nor of my person, and I am willing to own myself the least of the apostles, yea, less than the least of all saints; but I beg of you by the mild and gentle Spirit of my Lord and master, whom I am not ashamed to imitate, that you would not join in those sneers. I am Paul, autov , the same in my principles and practice, in my doctrine and life, when present and absent; though my enemies say the contrary, as that I am such an one, who in presence am base , or humble among you: they suggested, that when he was at Corinth he was humble and modest in his conversation, mild and gentle in all his expressions and deportment; and which they interpreted of a meanness and baseness of spirit, as though he crept and cringed to curry favour with men, to avoid offence, and gain and keep an interest among them: but being absent, am bold toward you ; wrote blustering, hectoring, terrifying letters, threatening to come with his apostolic rod and deliver them up to Satan, to fright them into a compliance with him.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-6 - While others thought meanly, and spake scornfully of the apostle, he had low thoughts, and spake humbly of himself. We should be aware of our own infirmities, and think humbly of ourselves, even when me reproach us. The work of the ministry is a spiritual warfare with spiritual enemies, and for spiritual purposes. Outward force is not the method of the gospel, but strong persuasions, by the power of truth an the meekness of wisdom. Conscience is accountable to God only; an people must be persuaded to God and their duty, not driven by force Thus the weapons of our warfare are very powerful; the evidence of truth is convincing. What opposition is made against the gospel, by the powers of sin and Satan in the hearts of men! But observe the conques the word of God gains. The appointed means, however feeble they appea to some, will be mighty through God. And the preaching of the cross, by men of faith and prayer, has always been fatal to idolatry, impiety and wickedness.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    αυτος
    846 P-NSM δε 1161 CONJ εγω 1473 P-1NS παυλος 3972 N-NSM παρακαλω 3870 5719 V-PAI-1S υμας 5209 P-2AP δια 1223 PREP της 3588 T-GSF πραοτητος 4236 N-GSF και 2532 CONJ επιεικειας 1932 N-GSF του 3588 T-GSM χριστου 5547 N-GSM ος 3739 R-NSM κατα 2596 PREP προσωπον 4383 N-ASN μεν 3303 PRT ταπεινος 5011 A-NSM εν 1722 PREP υμιν 5213 P-2DP απων 548 5752 V-PXP-NSM δε 1161 CONJ θαρρω 2292 5719 V-PAI-1S-C εις 1519 PREP υμας 5209 P-2AP

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    1. I
    Paul myself. "This emphatic stress on his own person is the fit introduction to the portion of the epistle which, beyond any other part of his writings, is to lay open his individual life and character" (Stanley). "Paul boldly casts into the scales of his readers the weight of his own personality over against his calumniators" (Meyer).

    Meekness - gentleness. See on Matt. v. 5; 1 Pet. ii. 18.

    Base (tapeinov). Better, as Rev., lowly. The sneer of his opponents that he was unassuming in their presence, but bold when absent. "It was easy to satirize and misrepresent a depression of spirits, a humility of demeanor, which were either the direct results of some bodily affliction, or which the consciousness of this affliction had rendered habitual. We feel at once that this would be natural to the bowed and weak figure which Albrecht Durer has represented; but that it would be impossible to the imposing orator whom Raphael has placed on the steps of the Areopagus" (Farrar).

    This is the only passage in the New Testament in which tapeinov lowly, bears the contemptuous sense which attaches to it in classical usage, an illustration of which may be found in Xenophon's story of Socrates' interview with the painter Parrhasius. "Surely meanness and servility (to tapeinon te kai aneleuqeron) show themselves in the looks (dia proswpou, the same word as Paul's) and gestures of men" ("Memorabilia," iii., 10, 5). So Aristotle says that frequently to submit to receive service from another, and to disparage whatever he himself has done well, are signs of littleness of soul (mikroyuciav) and meanness (tapeinothtov). In the Septuagint the words penhv poor, prauv meek, ptwcov destitute, and tapeinov lowly, are used interchangeably to translate the same Hebrew words; the reference ordinarily being to the oppressed, in contrast with their rich and powerful oppressors, or to the quiet, in contrast with lawless wrong-doers. Compare Deuteronomy xv. 11; 2 Sam. xxii. 28; Psalm xviii. (Sept. 17.) 27; Isa. xxvi. 6; Psalm x. 17 (Sept. ix. 38); Prov. xiv. 21; iii. 34; Num. xii. 3; Exod. xxiii. 6, 11; Isaiah xxxii. 7; Exod. xxiii. 3; Ruth iii. 10; Isa. xi. 4; 2 Sam. xii. 1, 3, 4; Proverbs xiii. 8; 1 Sam. xviii. 23. The Septuagint usage therefore goes to show that these four words are all names for one class - the poor peasantry of an oppressed country, the victims of ill-treatment and plunder at the hands of tyrants and rich neighbors. 153


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    10:1 {Now I Paul myself} (autos de egw paulos). Cf. #Ga 5:2. Paul now turns to the third part of the epistle in chapters #10-13 in which he vigorously defends himself against the accusations of the stubborn minority of Judaizers in Corinth. Great ministers of Christ through the ages have had to pass through fiery trials like these. Paul has shown the way for us all. He speaks of himself now plainly, but under compulsion, as is clear. It may be that at this point he took the pen from the amanuensis and wrote himself as in #Ga 6:11. {By the meekness and gentleness of Christ} (dia tes prautetos kai epieikias tou cristou). this appeal shows (Plummer) that Paul had spoken to the Corinthians about the character of Christ. Jesus claimed meekness for himself (#Mt 11:29) and felicitated the meek (#Mt 5:5) and he exemplified it abundantly (#Lu 23:34). See on Mt 5:15; 1Co 4:21 for this great word that has worn thin with us. Plutarch combines prautes with epieikia as Paul does here. Matthew Arnold suggested "sweet reasonableness" for epieikeia in Plato, Aristotle, Plutarch. It is in the N.T. only here and #Ac 24:4 (to epieikes in #Php 4:5). In Greek Ethics the equitable man was called epieikes, a man who does not press for the last farthing of his rights (Bernard). {Lowly among you} (tapeinos en humin). The bad use of tapeinos, the old use, but here alone in N.T. in that meaning. Socrates and Aristotle used it for littleness of soul. Probably Paul here is quoting one of the sneers of his traducers in Corinth about his humble conduct while with them (#1Co 2:23; 2Co 7:6) and his boldness (apwn qarrw) when away (#1Co 7:16). "It was easy to satirize and misrepresent a depression of spirits, a humility of demeanour, which were either the direct results of some bodily affliction, or which the consciousness of this affliction had rendered habitual" (Farrar). The words stung Paul to the quick.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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