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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Hebrews 2:14


    CHAPTERS: Hebrews 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13     

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    King James Bible - Hebrew 2:14

    Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil;

    World English Bible

    Since then the children have shared in flesh and blood, he also himself in the same way partook of the same, that through death he might bring to nothing him who had the
    power of death, that is, the devil,

    Douay-Rheims - Hebrew 2:14

    Therefore because the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself in like manner hath been partaker of the same: that, through death, he might destroy him who had the empire of death, that is to say, the devil:

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Since then the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the
    power of death, that is, the devil;

    Greek Textus Receptus


    επει
    1893 ουν 3767 τα 3588 παιδια 3813 κεκοινωνηκεν 2841 5758 σαρκος 4561 και 2532 αιματος 129 και 2532 αυτος 846 παραπλησιως 3898 μετεσχεν 3348 5627 των 3588 αυτων 846 ινα 2443 δια 1223 του 3588 θανατου 2288 καταργηση 2673 5661 τον 3588 το 3588 κρατος 2904 εχοντα 2192 5723 του 3588 θανατου 2288 τουτ 5124 εστιν 2076 5748 τον 3588 διαβολον 1228

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (14) -
    :10

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 2:14

    ¶ Así que, por cuanto los hijos participan de carne y sangre, l tambin particip de lo mismo, para destruir por la muerte al que tenía el imperio de la muerte, esto es, al diablo,

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Hebrew 2:14

    Verse 14. The
    children are partakers of flesh and blood] Since those children of God, who have fallen and are to be redeemed, are human beings; in order to be qualified to redeem them by suffering and dying in their stead, He himself likewise took part of the same - he became incarnate; and thus he who was God with God, became man with men. By the children here we are to understand, not only the disciples and all genuine Christians, as in ver. 13, but also the whole human race; all Jews and all Gentiles; so John xi. 51, l2: He prophesied that Jesus should die for that nation; and not for that nation only, but also that he should gather together in one the CHILDREN of GOD that were scattered abroad; meaning, probably, all the Jews in every part of the earth. But collate this with 1 John ii. 2, where: the evangelist explains the former words: He is the propitiation for our sins, (the Jews,) and not for ours only, but for the sins of the WHOLE WORLD. As the apostle was writing to the Hebrews only, he in general uses a Jewish phraseology, pointing out to them their own privileges; and rarely introduces the Gentiles, or what the Messiah has done for the other nations of the earth.

    That through death] That by the merit of his own death, making atonement for sin, and procuring the almighty energy of the Holy Spirit, he might counterwork katarghsh, or render useless and ineffectual, all the operations of him who had the power, kratov, or influence, to bring death into the world; so that death, which was intended by him who was a murderer from the beginning to be the final ruin of mankind, becomes the instrument of their exaltation and endless glory; and thus the death brought in by Satan is counterworked and rendered ineffectual by the death of Christ.

    Him that had the power of death] This is spoken in conformity to an opinion prevalent among the Jews, that there was a certain fallen angel who was called twmh alm malak hammaveth, the angel of death; i.e. one who had the power of separating the soul from the body, when God decreed that the person should die. There were two of these, according to some of the Jewish writers: one was the angel of death to the Gentiles; the other, to the Jews. Thus Tob haarets, fol. x21: "There are two angels which preside over death: one is over those who die out of the land of Israel, and his name is Sammael; the other is he who presides over those who die in the land of Israel, and this is Gabriel." Sammael is a common name for the devil among the Jews; and there is a tradition among them, delivered by the author of Pesikta rabbetha in Yalcut Simeoni, par. 2, f. 56, that the angel of death should be destroyed by the Messiah! "Satan said to the holy blessed God: Lord of the world, show me the Messiah. The Lord answered: Come and see him. And when he had seen him he was terrified, and his countenance fell, and he said: Most certainly this is the Messiah who shall cast me and all the nations into hell, as it is written Isa. xxv. 8, The Lord shall swallow up death for ever." This is a very remarkable saying, and the apostle shows that it is true, for the Messiah came to destroy him who had the power of death. Dr. Owen has made some collections on this head from other Jewish writers which tend to illustrate this verse; they may he seen in his comment, vol. i., p. 456, 8vo. edition.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 14. Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood , etc..] By the children are meant, not the children of this world, or the men of it; nor the children of the flesh, or Abraham's natural seed; nor visible professors of religion; nor the apostles of Christ only; but all the children of God, the children given to Christ; all the sons that are brought to glory: these are partakers of flesh and blood; of human nature, which is common to them all, and which is subject to infirmity and mortality; and the sense is, that they are frail mortal men: and this being their state and case, he also himself took part of the same ; Christ became man also, or assumed an human nature like theirs; this shows that he existed before his incarnation, who of himself, and by his own voluntary act, assumed an individual of human nature into union with his divine person, which is expressive of wondrous grace and condescension: Christ's participation of human nature, and the children's, in some things agree, in others they differ; they agree in this, that it is real flesh and blood they both partake of; that Christ's body is not spiritual and heavenly, but natural as theirs is; and that it is a complete, perfect, human nature, and subject to mortality and infirmity like theirs: but then Christ took his nature of a virgin, and is without sin; nor has it any distinct personality, but from the moment of its being subsisted in his divine person: and now the true reason of Christ's assuming such a nature was on account of the children, which discovers great love to them, and shows that it was with a peculiar view to them that he became man; hence they only share the special advantages of his incarnation, sufferings, and death: and his end in doing this was, that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death , that is, the devil; the devil is said to have the power of death, not because he can kill and destroy men at pleasure, but because he was the first introducer of sin, which brought death into the world, and so he was a murderer from the beginning; and he still tempts men to sin, and then accuses them of it, and terrifies and affrights them with death; and by divine permission has inflicted it, and will be the executioner of the second death. The apostle here speaks in the language of the Jews, who often call Samael, or Satan, twmh alm , the angel of death, in their Targums f34 , Talmud f35 , and other writings f36 ; and say, he was the cause of death to all the world; and ascribe much the same things to him, for which the apostle here so styles him: and they moreover say f37 , that he will cease in the time to come; that is, in the days of the Messiah: and who being come, has destroyed him, not as to his being, but as to his power; he has bruised his head, destroyed his works, disarmed his principalities and powers, and took the captives out of his hands, and saved those he would have devoured: and this he has done by death; by his own death, as the Syriac and Arabic versions read; whereby he has abolished death itself, and sin the cause of it, and so Satan, whose empire is supported by it.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 14-18 - The
    angels fell, and remained without hope or help. Christ neve designed to be the Saviour of the fallen angels, therefore he did no take their nature; and the nature of angels could not be an atonin sacrifice for the sin of man. Here is a price paid, enough for all, an suitable to all, for it was in our nature. Here the wonderful love of God appeared, that, when Christ knew what he must suffer in our nature and how he must die in it, yet he readily took it upon him. And thi atonement made way for his people's deliverance from Satan's bondage and for the pardon of their sins through faith. Let those who drea death, and strive to get the better of their terrors, no longer attemp to outbrave or to stifle them, no longer grow careless or wicke through despair. Let them not expect help from the world, or huma devices; but let them seek pardon, peace, grace, and a lively hope of heaven, by faith in Him who died and rose again, that thus they ma rise above the fear of death. The remembrance of his own sorrows an temptations, makes Christ mindful of the trials of his people, an ready to help them. He is ready and willing to succour those who ar tempted, and seek him. He became man, and was tempted, that he might be every way qualified to succour his people, seeing that he had passe through the same temptations himself, but continued perfectly free from sin. Then let not the afflicted and tempted despond, or give place to Satan, as if temptations made it wrong for them to come to the Lord in prayer. Not soul ever perished under temptation, that cried unto the Lord from real alarm at its danger, with faith and expectation of relief. This is our duty upon our first being surprised by temptations and would stop their progress, which is our wisdom __________________________________________________________________


    Greek Textus Receptus


    επει
    1893 ουν 3767 τα 3588 παιδια 3813 κεκοινωνηκεν 2841 5758 σαρκος 4561 και 2532 αιματος 129 και 2532 αυτος 846 παραπλησιως 3898 μετεσχεν 3348 5627 των 3588 αυτων 846 ινα 2443 δια 1223 του 3588 θανατου 2288 καταργηση 2673 5661 τον 3588 το 3588 κρατος 2904 εχοντα 2192 5723 του 3588 θανατου 2288 τουτ 5124 εστιν 2076 5748 τον 3588 διαβολον 1228

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    14. The
    children (ta paidia). Children of men, the subjects of Christ's redemption.

    Are partakers of flesh and blood (kekoinwnhken aimatov kai sarkov). For kekoinwnhken see on Rom. xii. 13. For flesh and blood the correct text reads blood and flesh. In rabbinical writers a standing phrase for human nature in contrast with God.

    Likewise (paraplhsiwv). Rend. in like manner. N.T.o . Expressing general similarity. He took his place alongside (para) and near (plhsiov): near by.

    Took part (metescen). The verb only in Hebrews and Paul. The distinction between it and kekoinwnhken were partakers is correctly stated by Westcott; the latter marking the characteristic sharing of the common fleshly nature as it pertains to the human race at large, and the former signifying the unique fact of the incarnation as a voluntary acceptance of humanity.

    He might destroy (katarghsh). Rend. bring to nought. See on cumbereth, Luke xiii. 7, and make of none effect, Rom. iii. 3. The word occurs 27 times in N.T., and is rendered in 17 different ways in A.V. Him that had the power of death (ton to kratov econta tou qanatou). Not power over death, but sovereignty or dominion of death, a sovereignty of which death is the realm. Comp. Rom. v. 21, "Sin reigned in death."

    That is the devil. An explanation has been sought in the Jewish doctrine which identified Satan with Sammal, the angel of death, who, according to the later Jews, tempted Eve. This is fanciful, and has no value, to say nothing of the fact that Michael and not Sammal was the angel of death to the Israelites. The O.T. nowhere identifies Satan with the serpent in Eden. That identification is found in Wisd. ii. 24, and is adopted Apoc. xii. 9. The devil has not power to inflict death, nor is death, as such, done away by the bringing of the devil to nought. The sense of the passage is that Satan's dominion in the region of death is seen in the existence and power of the fear of death as the penalty of sin (comp. through fear of death, ver. 15). The fear of death as implying rejection by God is distinctly to be seen in O.T. It appears in the utterances of many of the Psalmists. There is a consciousness of the lack of a pledge that God will not, in any special case, rise up against one. Along with this goes the conception of Satan as the accuser, see Zechariah 3. This idea may possibly give coloring to this passage. Even before death the accuser exercises sway, and keeps God's people in bondage so long as they are oppressed with the fear of death as indicating the lack of full acceptance with God. How strongly this argument would appeal to Hebrew readers of the Epistle is clear from rabbinical theology, which often speaks of the fear of death, and the accuser as a constant companion of man's life. Jesus assumes the mortal flesh and blood which are subject to this bondage. He proves himself to be both exempt from the fear of death and victorious over the accuser. He never lost his sense of oneness with God, so that death was not to him a sign of separation from God's grace. It was a step in his appointed career; a means (dia tou qanatou) whereby he accomplished his vocation as Savior. His human brethren share his exemption from the bondage of the fear of death, and of the accusing power of Satan. "He that believeth on the Son hath eternal life." "Whether we live or die we are the Lord's." 177



    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

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