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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Mark 6:23


    CHAPTERS: Mark 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Mark 6:23

    και 2532 ωμοσεν 3660 5656 αυτη 846 οτι 3754 ο 3739 εαν 1437 με 3165 αιτησης 154 5661 δωσω 1325 5692 σοι 4671 εως 2193 ημισους 2255 της 3588 βασιλειας 932 μου 3450

    Douay Rheims Bible

    And he swore to her: Whatsoever thou shalt ask I will give thee, though it be the half of my kingdom.

    King James Bible - Mark 6:23

    And he sware unto her, Whatsoever thou shalt ask of me, I will give it thee, unto the half of my kingdom.

    World English Bible

    He swore to her, "Whatever you shall ask of me, I will give you, up to half of my kingdom."

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-09 iv.iii.xviii Pg 19, Npnf-110 iii.XLVIII Pg 54, Npnf-110 iii.XLVIII Pg 69, Npnf-210 iv.vii.iv.vi Pg 6

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Mark 6:23

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 viii.ii.xvi Pg 5
    Matt. v. 34; 27.

    And that we ought to worship God alone, He thus persuaded us: “The greatest commandment is, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and Him only shall thou serve, with all thy heart, and with all thy strength, the Lord God that made thee.”1797

    1797


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iii Pg 17
    Matt. v. 34.

    For these words are evidently spoken with reference to the Creator, as also Esaias says: “Heaven is my throne, the earth is my footstool.”3819

    3819


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xi Pg 6
    Matt. v. 34–37; Jas. v. 12.

    )—is trade adapted for a servant of God? But, covetousness apart, what is the motive for acquiring? When the motive for acquiring ceases, there will be no necessity for trading. Grant now that there be some righteousness in business, secure from the duty of watchfulness against covetousness and mendacity; I take it that that trade which pertains to the very soul and spirit of idols, which pampers every demon, falls under the charge of idolatry. Rather, is not that the principal idolatry? If the selfsame merchandises—frankincense, I mean, and all other foreign productions—used as sacrifice to idols, are of use likewise to men for medicinal ointments, to us Christians also, over and above, for solaces of sepulture, let them see to it. At all events, while the pomps, while the priesthoods, while the sacrifices of idols, are furnished by dangers, by losses, by inconveniences, by cogitations, by runnings to and fro, or trades, what else are you demonstrated to be but an idols’ agent? Let none contend that, in this way, exception may be taken to all trades. All graver faults extend the sphere for diligence in watchfulness proportionably to the magnitude of the danger; in order that we may withdraw not only from the faults, but from the means through which they have being. For although the fault be done by others, it makes no difference if it be by my means. In no case ought I to be necessary to another, while he is doing what to me is unlawful.  Hence I ought to understand that care must be taken by me, lest what I am forbidden to do be done by my means. In short, in another cause of no lighter guilt I observe that fore-judgment. In that I am interdicted from fornication, I furnish nothing of help or connivance to others for that purpose; in that I have separated my own flesh itself from stews, I acknowledge that I cannot exercise the trade of pandering, or keep that kind of places for my neighbour’s behoof.  So, too, the interdiction of murder shows me that a trainer of gladiators also is excluded from the Church; nor will any one fail to be the means of doing what he subministers to another to do. Behold, here is a more kindred fore-judgment: if a purveyor of the public victims come over to the faith, will you permit him to remain permanently in that trade? or if one who is already a believer shall have undertaken that business, will you think that he is to be retained in the Church?  No, I take it; unless any one will dissemble in the case of a frankincense-seller too. In sooth, the agency of blood pertains to some, that of odours to others. If, before idols were in the world, idolatry, hitherto shapeless, used to be transacted by these wares; if, even now, the work of idolatry is perpetrated, for the most part, without the idol, by burnings of odours; the frankincense-seller is a something even more serviceable even toward demons, for idolatry is more easily carried on without the idol, than without the ware of the frankincense-seller.234

    234 [The aversion of the early Christian Fathers passim to the ceremonial use of incense finds one explanation here.]

    Let us interrogate thoroughly the conscience of the faith itself. With what mouth will a Christian frankincense-seller, if he shall pass through temples, with what mouth will he spit down upon and blow out the smoking altars, for which himself has made provision? With what consistency will he exorcise his own foster-children,235

    235 i.e., the demons, or idols, to whom incense is burned.

    to whom he affords his own house as store-room?  Indeed, if he shall have ejected a demon,236

    236 i.e., from one possessed.

    let him not congratulate himself on his faith, for he has not ejected an enemy; he ought to have had his prayer easily granted by one whom he is daily feeding.237

    237 i.e., The demon, in gratitude for the incense which the man daily feeds him with, ought to depart out of the possessed at his request.

    No art, then, no profession, no trade, which administers either to equipping or forming idols, can be free from the title of idolatry; unless we interpret idolatry to be altogether something else than the service of idol-tendence.


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xi Pg 6
    Matt. v. 34–37; Jas. v. 12.

    )—is trade adapted for a servant of God? But, covetousness apart, what is the motive for acquiring? When the motive for acquiring ceases, there will be no necessity for trading. Grant now that there be some righteousness in business, secure from the duty of watchfulness against covetousness and mendacity; I take it that that trade which pertains to the very soul and spirit of idols, which pampers every demon, falls under the charge of idolatry. Rather, is not that the principal idolatry? If the selfsame merchandises—frankincense, I mean, and all other foreign productions—used as sacrifice to idols, are of use likewise to men for medicinal ointments, to us Christians also, over and above, for solaces of sepulture, let them see to it. At all events, while the pomps, while the priesthoods, while the sacrifices of idols, are furnished by dangers, by losses, by inconveniences, by cogitations, by runnings to and fro, or trades, what else are you demonstrated to be but an idols’ agent? Let none contend that, in this way, exception may be taken to all trades. All graver faults extend the sphere for diligence in watchfulness proportionably to the magnitude of the danger; in order that we may withdraw not only from the faults, but from the means through which they have being. For although the fault be done by others, it makes no difference if it be by my means. In no case ought I to be necessary to another, while he is doing what to me is unlawful.  Hence I ought to understand that care must be taken by me, lest what I am forbidden to do be done by my means. In short, in another cause of no lighter guilt I observe that fore-judgment. In that I am interdicted from fornication, I furnish nothing of help or connivance to others for that purpose; in that I have separated my own flesh itself from stews, I acknowledge that I cannot exercise the trade of pandering, or keep that kind of places for my neighbour’s behoof.  So, too, the interdiction of murder shows me that a trainer of gladiators also is excluded from the Church; nor will any one fail to be the means of doing what he subministers to another to do. Behold, here is a more kindred fore-judgment: if a purveyor of the public victims come over to the faith, will you permit him to remain permanently in that trade? or if one who is already a believer shall have undertaken that business, will you think that he is to be retained in the Church?  No, I take it; unless any one will dissemble in the case of a frankincense-seller too. In sooth, the agency of blood pertains to some, that of odours to others. If, before idols were in the world, idolatry, hitherto shapeless, used to be transacted by these wares; if, even now, the work of idolatry is perpetrated, for the most part, without the idol, by burnings of odours; the frankincense-seller is a something even more serviceable even toward demons, for idolatry is more easily carried on without the idol, than without the ware of the frankincense-seller.234

    234 [The aversion of the early Christian Fathers passim to the ceremonial use of incense finds one explanation here.]

    Let us interrogate thoroughly the conscience of the faith itself. With what mouth will a Christian frankincense-seller, if he shall pass through temples, with what mouth will he spit down upon and blow out the smoking altars, for which himself has made provision? With what consistency will he exorcise his own foster-children,235

    235 i.e., the demons, or idols, to whom incense is burned.

    to whom he affords his own house as store-room?  Indeed, if he shall have ejected a demon,236

    236 i.e., from one possessed.

    let him not congratulate himself on his faith, for he has not ejected an enemy; he ought to have had his prayer easily granted by one whom he is daily feeding.237

    237 i.e., The demon, in gratitude for the incense which the man daily feeds him with, ought to depart out of the possessed at his request.

    No art, then, no profession, no trade, which administers either to equipping or forming idols, can be free from the title of idolatry; unless we interpret idolatry to be altogether something else than the service of idol-tendence.


    Anf-03 v.iii.xxvi Pg 15
    Matt. v. 37.

    so that they were not to handle the gospel in a diversity of treatment.


    Anf-03 v.vii.xxiii Pg 9
    Matt. v. 37.

    She who bare (really) bare; and although she was a virgin when she conceived, she was a wife7257

    7257 Nupsit.

    when she brought forth her son. Now, as a wife, she was under the very law of “opening the womb,”7258

    7258 Nupsit ipsa patefacti corporis lege.

    wherein it was quite immaterial whether the birth of the male was by virtue of a husband’s co-operation or not;7259

    7259 De vi masculi admissi an emissi.

    it was the same sex7260

    7260 i.e. “The male.”

    that opened her womb. Indeed, hers is the womb on account of which it is written of others also: “Every male that openeth the womb shall be called holy to the Lord.”7261

    7261


    Anf-03 v.ix.ix Pg 9
    Matt. v. 37.



    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 6

    VERSE 	(23) - 

    1Sa 28:10 2Ki 6:31 Mt 5:34-37; 14:7


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