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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 1 Corinthians 13:3


    CHAPTERS: 1 Corinthians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     
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    King James Bible - 1 Corinthians 13:3

    And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing.

    World English Bible

    If I dole out all my goods to
    feed the poor, and if I give my body to be burned, but don't have love, it profits me nothing.

    Douay-Rheims - 1 Corinthians 13:3

    And if I should distribute all my goods to
    feed the poor, and if I should deliver my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And though I bestow all my goods to
    feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ εαν 1437 COND ψωμισω 5595 5661 V-AAS-1S παντα 3956 A-APN τα 3588 T-APN υπαρχοντα 5224 5723 V-PAP-APN μου 3450 P-1GS και 2532 CONJ εαν 1437 COND παραδω 3860 5632 V-2AAS-1S το 3588 T-ASN σωμα 4983 N-ASN μου 3450 P-1GS ινα 2443 CONJ καυθησωμαι 2545 5703 V-FPS-1S αγαπην 26 N-ASF δε 1161 CONJ μη 3361 PRT-N εχω 2192 5725 V-PAS-1S ουδεν 3762 A-ASN ωφελουμαι 5623 5743 V-PPI-1S

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (3) -
    Mt 6:1-4; 23:5 Lu 18:22,28; 19:8; 21:3,4 Joh 12:43 Ga 5:26

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 13:3

    Y si repartiese toda mi hacienda para dar de comer a los pobres, y si entregase mi cuerpo para ser quemado, y no tengo caridad, de nada me sirve.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 1 Corinthians 13:3

    Verse 3. And though I bestow all my goods to
    feed the poor] This is a proof that charity, in our sense of the word, is not what the apostle means; for surely almsgiving can go no farther than to give up all that a man possesses in order to relieve the wants of others. The word ywmizw, which we translate to feed the poor, signifies to divide into morsels, and put into the mouth; which implies carefulness and tenderness in applying the bounty thus freely given.

    And though I give my body to be burned] ina kauqhsomai? Mr. Wakefield renders this clause thus: And though I give up my body so as to have cause of boasting: in vindication of which he, first, refers to Dan. iii. 28; Acts xv. 26; Rom. viii. 32; Phil. i. 20. He says that there is no such word as kauqhswmai. 3. That kauchswmai, that I may boast, is the reading of the AEthiopic and Coptic, and he might have added of the Codex Alexandrinus; several Greek and Latin MSS. referred to by St. Jerome; of Ephraim; and of St. Jerome himself, who translates the passage thus: Si tradidero corpus meum ut glorier: i.e. "If I deliver up my body that I may glory, or have cause of boasting." 4. He adds that burning, though a common punishment in after times, was not prevalent when this epistle was written.

    Some of the foreign critics, particularly Schulzius, translate it thus: Si traderem corpus, ut mihi stigma inureretur: "If I should deliver up my body to receive a stigma with a hot iron;" which may mean, If I should, in order to redeem another, willingly give up myself to slavery, and receive the mark of my owner, by having my flesh stamped with a hot iron, and have not love, as before specified, it profits me nothing. This gives a good sense; but will the passage bear it? In the MSS. there are several various readings, which plainly show the original copyists scarcely knew what to make of the word kauqhswmai, which they found in the text generally.

    The various readings are, kauqhsomai, which Griesbach seems to prefer; kauqhsetai; and kauqh; all of which give little variation of meaning.

    Which should be preferred I can scarcely venture to say. If we take the commonly received word, it states a possible case; a man may be so obstinately wedded to a particular opinion, demonstrably false in itself, as to give up his body to be burned in its defense, as was literally the case with Vanini, who, for his obstinate atheism, was burnt alive at Paris, February 19th, A. D. 1619. In such a cause, his giving his body to be burned certainly profited him nothing.

    "We may observe," says Dr. Lightfoot, "in those instances which are compared with charity, and are as good as nothing if charity be absent, that the apostle mentions those which were of the noblest esteem in the Jewish nation; and also that the most precious things that could be named by them were compared with this more precious, and were of no account in comparison of it.

    "1. To speak with the tongues of men, among the Jewish interpreters, means, to speak the languages of the seventy nations. To the praise of Mordecai, they say that he understood all those languages; and they require that the fathers of the Sanhedrin should be skilled in many languages that they may not be obliged to hear any thing by an interpreter. Maim. in Sanh., c. 2.

    "2. To speak with the tongues of angels, they thought to be not only an excellent gift, but to be possible; and highly extol Jochanan ben Zaccai because he understood them: see the note on ver. 1.

    "3. To know all mysteries and all knowledge was not only prized but affected by them. Of Hillel, the elder, they say he had eighty disciples: thirty who were worthy to have the Holy Spirit dwell upon them, as it did upon Moses; thirty who were worthy that the sun should stop his course for them, as it did for Joshua; and there were twenty between both. The greatest of all was Jonathan ben Uzziel; the least was Jochanan ben Zaccai.

    He omitted not (i.e. perfectly understood) the Scripture, the Mishna, the Gemara, the idiotisms of the law, and the scribes, traditions, illustrations, comparisons, equalities, gematries, parables, &c.

    "4. The moving or rooting up of mountains, which among them signified the removing of the greatest difficulties, especially from the sacred text, they considered also a high and glorious attainment: see the note on Matt. xxi. 21. And of his salvation, who had it, they could not have formed the slightest doubt. But the apostle says, a man might have and enjoy all those gifts, &c., and be nothing in himself, and be nothing profited by them." The reader will consider that the charity or love, concerning which the apostle speaks, is that which is described from ver. 4-7, inclusive: it is not left to the conjectures of men to find it out. What the apostle means is generally allowed to be true religion; but if he had not described it, this true religion would have been as various as the parties are who suppose they have it. Let the reader also observe that, not only the things which are in the highest repute among the Jews, but the things which are in the highest repute among Christians and Gentiles are those which the apostle shows to be of no use, if the love hereafter described be wanting. And yet, who can suppose that the man already described can be destitute of true religion, as he must be under an especial influence of God; else, how, 1st, could he speak all the languages of men? for this was allowed to be one of the extraordinary gifts of God's Spirit. 2. He must have Divine teaching to know the language of angels, and thus to get acquainted with the economy of the invisible world. 3. Without immediate influence from God he could not be a prophet, and predict future events.

    4. Without this he could not understand all the mysteries of the Divine word, nor those of Providence. 5. All knowledge, suppose this to be confined to human arts and sciences, could not be acquired without especial assistance. 6. And without the most powerful and extraordinary assistance, he could not have a faith that could remove mountains, or miraculous faith of any kind: and the apostle supposes that a man might have all these six things, and not possess that religion which could save his soul! And may we not say that, if all these could not avail for salvation, a thousand times less surely cannot. How blindly, therefore, are multitudes of persons trusting in that which is almost infinitely less than that which the apostle says would profit them nothing! The charity or love which God recommends, the apostle describes in sixteen particulars, which are the following:-


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-3 - The excellent way had in view in the close of the former chapter, is not what is meant by charity in our common use of the word, almsgiving but love in its fullest meaning; true love to God and man. Withou this, the most glorious gifts are of no account to us, of no esteem in the sight of God. A clear head and a deep understanding, are of n value without a benevolent and charitable heart. There may be an ope and lavish hand, where there is not a liberal and charitable heart Doing good to others will do none to us, if it be not done from love to God, and good-will to men. If we give away all we have, while we withhold the heart from God, it will not profit. Nor even the mos painful sufferings. How are those deluded who look for acceptance an reward for their good works, which are as scanty and defective as the are corrupt and selfish!


    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ εαν 1437 COND ψωμισω 5595 5661 V-AAS-1S παντα 3956 A-APN τα 3588 T-APN υπαρχοντα 5224 5723 V-PAP-APN μου 3450 P-1GS και 2532 CONJ εαν 1437 COND παραδω 3860 5632 V-2AAS-1S το 3588 T-ASN σωμα 4983 N-ASN μου 3450 P-1GS ινα 2443 CONJ καυθησωμαι 2545 5703 V-FPS-1S αγαπην 26 N-ASF δε 1161 CONJ μη 3361 PRT-N εχω 2192 5725 V-PAS-1S ουδεν 3762 A-ASN ωφελουμαι 5623 5743 V-PPI-1S

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    3. Bestow (ywmisw). Only here and
    Rom. xii. 20. See on sop, John xiii. 26. The verb means to feed out in morsels, dole out.

    To be burned (ina kauqhswmai). The latest critical text reads kauchswmai in order that I may glory, after the three oldest MSS. The change to burned might have been suggested by the copyist's familiarity with christian martyrdoms, or by the story of the three Hebrews. Bishop Lightfoot finds a possible reference to the case of an Indian fanatic who, in the time of Augustus, burned himself alive at Athens. His tomb there was visible in Paul's time, and may have been seen by him. It bore the inscription: "Zarmochegas the Indian from Bargosa, according to the ancient customs of India, made himself immortal and lies here." Calanus, an Indian gymnosophist who followed Alexander, in order to get rid of his sufferings, burned himself before the Macedonian army (see Plutarch, "Alexander"). Martyrdom for the sake of ambition was a fact of early occurrence in the Church, if not in Paul's day. Farrar says of his age, "both at this time and in the persecution of Diocletian, there were Christians who, oppressed by debt, by misery, and sometimes even by a sense of guilt, thrust themselves into the glory and imagined redemptiveness of the baptism of blood.... The extravagant estimate formed of the merits of all who were confessors, became, almost immediately, the cause of grave scandals. We are horified to read in Cyprian's letter that even in prison, even when death was imminent, there were some of the confessors who were puffed up with vanity and pride, and seemed to think that the blood of martyrdom would avail them to wash away the stains of flagrant and even recent immoralities" ("Lives of the Fathers," ch. vi., sec. 2.).


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    13:3 {Bestow to feed} (ywmisw). First aorist active subjunctive of ywmizw, to feed, to nourish, from ywmos, morsel or bit, and so to feed, by putting a morsel into the mouth like infant (or bird). Old word, but only here in N.T. {To be burned} (hina kauqeswmai). First future passive subjunctive (Textus Receptus), but D kauqesomai (future passive indicative of kaiw, old word to burn). There were even some who courted martyrdom in later years (time of Diocletian). this Byzantine future subjunctive does not occur in the old MSS. (Robertson, _Grammar_, p. 876). Aleph A B here read kauceswmai, first aorist middle subjunctive of kaucaomai (so Westcott and Hort), "that I may glory." this is correct. {It profiteth me nothing} (ouden wfeloumai). Literally, I am helped nothing. ouden in the accusative case retained with passive verb. See two accusatives with wfelew in #14:6. Verb is old and from ofelos (profit).


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

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