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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 1 Corinthians 13:4


    CHAPTERS: 1 Corinthians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     
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    King James Bible - 1 Corinthians 13:4

    Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up,

    World English Bible

    Love is patient and is kind; love doesn't envy. Love doesn't brag, is not proud,

    Douay-Rheims - 1 Corinthians 13:4

    Charity is patient, is kind: charity envieth not, dealeth not perversely; is not puffed up;

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Charity suffereth
    long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up,

    Greek Textus Receptus


    η
    3588 T-NSF αγαπη 26 N-NSF μακροθυμει 3114 5719 V-PAI-3S χρηστευεται 5541 5736 V-PNI-3S η 3588 T-NSF αγαπη 26 N-NSF ου 3756 PRT-N ζηλοι 2206 5719 V-PAI-3S η 3588 T-NSF αγαπη 26 N-NSF ου 3756 PRT-N περπερευεται 4068 5736 V-PNI-3S ου 3756 PRT-N φυσιουται 5448 5743 V-PPI-3S

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (4) -
    Pr 10:12 2Co 6:6 Ga 5:22 Eph 4:2 Col 1:11; 3:12 2Ti 2:25; 3:10

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 13:4

    ¶ La caridad es sufrida, es benigna; la caridad no tiene envidia, la caridad no hace sin razn, no se envanece;

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 1 Corinthians 13:4

    Verse 4. (1.)
    Charity suffereth long] makroqumei, Has a long mind; to the end of which neither trials, adversities, persecutions, nor provocations, can reach. The love of God, and of our neighbour for God's sake, is patient towards all men: it suffers all the weakness, ignorance, errors, and infirmities of the children of God; and all the malice and wickedness of the children of this world; and all this, not merely for a time, but long, without end; for it is still a mind or disposition, to the end of which trials, difficulties, &c., can never reach. It also waits God's time of accomplishing his gracious or providential purposes, without murmuring or repining; and bears its own infirmities, as well as those of others, with humble submission to the will of God.

    (2.) Is kind] crhsteuetai? It is tender and compassionate in itself, and kind and obliging to others; it is mild, gentle, and benign; and, if called to suffer, inspires the sufferer with the most amiable sweetness, and the most tender affection. It is also submissive to all the dispensations of God; and creates trouble to no one.

    (3.) Charity envieth not] ou zhloi? Is not grieved because another possesses a greater portion of earthly, intellectual, or spiritual blessings.

    Those who have this pure love rejoice as much at the happiness, the honour, and comfort of others, as they can do in their own. They are ever willing that others should be preferred before them.

    (4.) Charity vaunteth not itself] ou perpereuetai? This word is variously translated; acteth not rashly, insolently; is not inconstant, &c. It is not agreed by learned men whether it be Greek, Latin, or Arabic. Bishop Pearce derived it from the latter language; and translates it, is not inconstant. There is a phrase in our own language that expresses what I think to be the meaning of the original, does not set itself forward-does not desire to be noticed or applauded; but wishes that God may be all in all.

    (5.) Is not puffed up] ou fusioutai? Is not inflated with a sense of its own importance; for it knows it has nothing but what it has received; and that it deserves nothing that it has got. Every man, whose heart is full of the love of God, is full of humility; for there is no man so humble as he whose heart is cleansed from all sin. It has been said that indwelling sin humbles us; never was there a greater falsity: PRIDE is the very essence of sin; he who has sin has pride, and pride too in proportion to his sin: this is a mere popish doctrine; and, strange to tell, the doctrine in which their doctrine of merit is founded! They say God leaves concupiscence in the heart of every Christian, that, in striving with and overcoming it from time to time, he may have an accumulation of meritorious acts: Certain Protestants say, it is a true sign of a very gracious state when a man feels and deplores his inbred corruptions. How near do these come to the Papists, whose doctrine they profess to detest and abhor! The truth is, it is no sign of grace whatever; it only argues, as they use it, that the man has got light to show him his corruptions; but he has not yet got grace to destroy them. He is convinced that he should have the mind of Christ, but he feels that he has the mind of Satan; he deplores it, and, if his bad doctrine do not prevent him, he will not rest till he feels the blood of Christ cleansing him from all sin.

    True humility arises from a sense of the fullness of God in the soul; abasement from a sense of corruption is a widely different thing; but this has been put in the place of humility, and even called grace; many, very many, verify the saying of the poet:- "Proud I am my wants to see; Proud of my humility."


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 4-7 - Some of the effects of charity are stated, that we may know whether we have this grace; and that if we have not, we may not rest till we have it. This love is a clear proof of regeneration, and is a touchstone of our professed faith in Christ. In this beautiful description of the nature and effects of love, it is meant to show the Corinthians tha their conduct had, in many respects, been a contrast to it. Charity is an utter enemy to selfishness; it does not desire or seek its ow praise, or honour, or profit, or pleasure. Not that charity destroy all regard to ourselves, or that the charitable man should neglec himself and all his interests. But charity never seeks its own to the hurt of others, or to neglect others. It ever prefers the welfare of others to its private advantage. How good-natured and amiable in Christian charity! How excellent would Christianity appear to the world, if those who profess it were more under this Divine principle and paid due regard to the command on which its blessed Author laid the chief stress! Let us ask whether this Divine love dwells in our hearts Has this principle guided us into becoming behaviour to all men? Are we willing to lay aside selfish objects and aims? Here is a call to watchfulness, diligence, and prayer.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    η
    3588 T-NSF αγαπη 26 N-NSF μακροθυμει 3114 5719 V-PAI-3S χρηστευεται 5541 5736 V-PNI-3S η 3588 T-NSF αγαπη 26 N-NSF ου 3756 PRT-N ζηλοι 2206 5719 V-PAI-3S η 3588 T-NSF αγαπη 26 N-NSF ου 3756 PRT-N περπερευεται 4068 5736 V-PNI-3S ου 3756 PRT-N φυσιουται 5448 5743 V-PPI-3S

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    4. Suffereth
    long (makroqumei). See on Jas. v. 7.

    Is kind (crhsteuetai). Only here in the New Testament. See on crhstov, A.V., easy, Matt. xi. 30, and crhstothv good, Rom. iii. 12. "The high charity which makes us servants Prompt to the counsel which controls the world." DANTE, "Paradiso," xxi., 70, 71.

    Vaunteth (perpereuetai). From perperov a braggart. Used of one who sounds his own praises. Cicero introduces a compound of the word in one of his letters to Atticus, describing his speech in the presence of Pompey, who had just addressed the senate on his return from the Mithridatic war. He says: "Heavens! How I showed off (eneperpereusamhn) before my new auditor Pompey," and describes the various rhetorical tricks which he employed.

    Puffed up (fusioutai). See on ch. iv. 6, and compare ch. viii. 1. Of inward disposition, as the previous word denotes outward display. The opposite is put by Dante:

    "That swells with love the spirit well-disposed." "Paradiso," x., 144.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    13:4 Verses #4-7 picture the character or conduct of love in marvellous rhapsody. {Suffereth long} (makroqumei). Late _Koin_ word (Plutarch) from makros, long, qumos, passion, ardor. Cf. #Jas 5:7f. {Is kind} (cresteuetai). From crestos (useful, gracious, kind) and that from craomai, to use. Not found elsewhere save in Clement of Rome and Eusebius. "Perhaps of Paul's coining" (Findlay). Perhaps a vernacular word ready for Paul. Gentle in behavior. {Envieth not} (ou zeloi). Present active indicative of zelow (contraction oei=oi, same as subjunctive and optative forms). Bad sense of zelos from zew, to boil, good sense in #12:31. Love is neither jealous nor envious (both ideas). {Vaunteth not itself} (ou perpereuetai). From perperos, vainglorious, braggart (Polybius, Epictetus) like Latin _perperus_. Only here in N.T. and earliest known example. It means play the braggart. Marcus Anton. V. 5 uses it with areskeuomai, to play the toady. {Is not puffed up} (ou fusioutai). Present direct middle indicative of fusiow from fusis (late form for fusaw, fusiaw from fusa, bellows), to puff oneself out like a pair of bellows. this form in Herodas and Menander. Is not arrogant. See on 4:6.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

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