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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 1 Peter 4:1


    CHAPTERS: 1 Peter 1, 2, 3, 4, 5     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - DAVIS - FOCHT   |   VIDEO: GEN - BIB - COMM

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    King James Bible - 1 Peter 4:1

    Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;

    World English Bible

    Forasmuch then as Christ suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same mind; for he who has suffered in the flesh has ceased from sin;

    Douay-Rheims - 1 Peter 4:1

    Christ therefore having suffered in the flesh, be you also armed with the same thought: for he that hath suffered in the flesh, hath ceased from sins:

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;

    Greek Textus Receptus


    χριστου
    5547 ουν 3767 παθοντος 3958 5631 υπερ 5228 ημων 2257 σαρκι 4561 και 2532 υμεις 5210 την 3588 αυτην 846 εννοιαν 1771 οπλισασθε 3695 5669 οτι 3754 ο 3588 παθων 3958 5631 εν 1722 σαρκι 4561 πεπαυται 3973 5769 αμαρτιας 266

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (1) -
    1Pe 3:18

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 4:1

    ¶ Pues que el Cristo ha padecido por nosotros en la carne, vosotros tambin estad armados del mismo pensamiento; que el que ha padecido en la carne, ces de pecado;

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 1 Peter 4:1

    Verse 1. As
    Christ hath suffered] He is your proper pattern; have the same disposition he had; the same forgiving spirit, with meekness, gentleness, and complete self-possession.

    He that hath suffered in the flesh, hath ceased from sin] This is a general maxim, if understood literally: The man who suffers generally reflects on his ways, is humbled, fears approaching death, loathes himself because of his past iniquities, and ceases from them; for, in a state of suffering, the mind loses its relish for the sins of the flesh, because they are embittered to him through the apprehension which he has of death and judgment; and, on his application to God's mercy, he is delivered from his sin.

    Some suppose the words are to be understood thus: "Those who have firmly resolved, if called to it, to suffer death rather than apostatize from Christianity, have consequently ceased from, or are delivered from, the sin of saving their lives at the expense of their faith." Others think that it is a parallel passage to Romans vi. 7, and interpret it thus: "He that hath mortified the flesh, hath ceased from sin." Dr. Bentley applies the whole to our redemption by Christ: He that hath suffered in the flesh hath died for our sins. But this seems a very constrained sense.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 1. Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh . etc.] The apostle having finished his digression concerning Christ's preaching in the ministry of Noah, to men whose spirits were now in prison, and concerning the salvation of Noah's family in the ark, by water, and concerning its antitype, baptism, its nature and effect, returns to the sufferings of Christ he had before made mention of; and argues from thence to holiness of life, and patience in sufferings, after this manner; seeing then Christ, the eternal Son of God, the Lord of glory, the holy and Just One, suffered such indignities, reproaches, and persecutions from men, the wrath of God, the curses of the law, and death itself; and that not for himself, nor for angels, but for men, and those not all men, otherwise his death, with respect to some, must be in vain; but for a particular number of men, in distinction from others, described in the beginning of this epistle, as elect, according to the foreknowledge of God; and these sufferings he endured in the room and stead of those persons, in the days of his flesh, while here on earth, and in his human nature, both soul and body, and was crucified through the weakness of his flesh, and for the sins of our flesh, and which he bore in his own: arm yourselves likewise with the same mind ; that was in Christ; as he suffered for you, do ye likewise suffer for him, in his cause, for righteousness sake, for the sake of him and his Gospel; and bear all reproaches, afflictions, and persecutions on his account, willingly and cheerfully, with meekness and patience, as he did, and with the same view; not indeed to make satisfaction for sin, which was his principal design, but that being dead unto sin, you might live unto righteousness. The apostle speaks to the saints, in this exhortation, as to soldiers, and who had many enemies to engage with, and therefore should put on their armour, and be in a readiness to meet any attack upon them: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin : meaning either Christ, who having suffered in human nature for the sins of his people, whereby he has made satisfaction for them, is now clear of them; the sins that were imputed to him being took and bore away, finished and made an end of, and he justified from them, and freed from all the effects of them, and punishment for them, as from all the infirmities of human nature, from mortality and death: or the person that has suffered in and with Christ, his head and representative, which is all one as if he had suffered himself, in person; by virtue of which his sin ceases, and he ceases from being chargeable with it, as if he had never sinned; which is the case of every criminal, when he has suffered the penalty of the law for his crime: or else the person that is dead to sin, by virtue of the death of Christ, and, in imitation of it, who has been baptized into Christ's death, and planted in the likeness of it; whose old man is crucified with Christ, and he is dead with him; who has crucified the affections with the lusts, and through the Spirit has mortified the deeds of the body; which way the generality of interpreters go: such a man has ceased from sin; not from the being and indwelling of it in him; nor from the burden of it on him; nor from a continual war with it in him; nor from slips and falls by it, and into it; no, nor from it in the most solemn and religious services; but as from the guilt of it, and obligation to punishment by it, through the death of Christ; so from the servitude and dominion of it, through the power of divine grace, in consequence of Christ's death: or rather, the believer that suffers death in his body, for the sake of Christ, such an one immediately ceases from the very being of sin, and all commission of it; he becomes at once perfectly pure and holy, without spot or wrinkle, or any such thing; and a noble argument this is to meet death without fear, and to suffer it cheerfully and willingly, since the consequence of this will be an entire freedom from sin, than which nothing can be more desirable by a believer: to this agrees the Syriac version, which renders the words thus: for whoever is dead in his body hath ceased from all sins; but the Arabic version more fully confirms this sense, and is the best version of the text, and is this; be ye armed with this (same) thought, that (not for) he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin; that is, fortify your minds against all the fears of sufferings, and of death, for the sake of Christ, with this single thought; that he that has suffered martyrdom for Christ, in his body, or has suffered death for his sake, or dies in the Lord, is free from sin, and so from sorrow, and is the most happy person imaginable; so that this last clause is not a reason of the former, but points out, and is explanative of what that same mind or thought is Christians should arm themselves with, against the fears of death; and it is the best piece of armour for this service, a saint can make use of.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-6 - The strongest and
    best arguments against sin, are taken from the sufferings of Christ. He died to destroy sin; and though he cheerfull submitted to the worst sufferings, yet he never gave way to the leas sin. Temptations could not prevail, were it not for man's ow corruption; but true Christians make the will of God, not their ow lust or desires, the rule of their lives and actions. And tru conversion makes a marvellous change in the heart and life. It alter the mind, judgment, affections, and conversation. When a man is trul converted, it is very grievous to him to think how the time past of his life has been spent. One sin draws on another. Six sins are her mentioned which have dependence one upon another. It is a Christian' duty, not only to keep from gross wickedness, but also from things tha lead to sin, or appear evil. The gospel had been preached to thos since dead, who by the proud and carnal judgment of wicked men wer condemned as evil-doers, some even suffering death. But being quickene to Divine life by the Holy Spirit, they lived to God as his devote servants. Let not believers care, though the world scorns an reproaches them.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    χριστου
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    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    1.
    Arm yourselves (oplisasqe). Only here in New Testament. The thought is Pauline. See Rom. xiii. 12; 2 Cor. vi. 7; Eph. vi. 10, 17; 1 Thess. v. 8; Col. iii. 12.

    Mind (ennoian). Only here and Heb. iv. 12. Literally the word means thought, and so some render it here. Rev. puts it in margin. The rendering intent, resolution, is very doubtful. It seems rather to be the thought as determining the resolution. Since Christ has suffered in the flesh, be ye also willing to suffer in the flesh.



    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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