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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - James 2:20


    CHAPTERS: James 1, 2, 3, 4, 5     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS - FOCHT   |   VIDEO: BIB - COMM

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    King James Bible - James 2:20

    But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead?

    World English Bible

    But do you want to know, vain man, that faith apart from works is dead?

    Douay-Rheims - James 2:20

    But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead?

    Webster's Bible Translation

    But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead?

    Greek Textus Receptus


    θελεις
    2309 5719 δε 1161 γνωναι 1097 5629 ω 5599 ανθρωπε 444 κενε 2756 οτι 3754 η 3588 πιστις 4102 χωρις 5565 των 3588 εργων 2041 νεκρα 3498 εστιν 2076 5748

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (20) -
    Jas 1:26 Job 11:11,12 Ps 94:8-11 Pr 12:11 Jer 2:5 Ro 1:21

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 2:20

    ¿Mas oh hombre vano, quieres saber que la fe sin obras es muerta?

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - James 2:20

    Verse 20. But wilt thou know]
    Art thou willing to be instructed in the nature of true saving faith? Then attend to the following examples.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 20. But wilt thou know, O
    vain man , etc.] These are the words of the apostle reassuming the argument, that faith without works is dead, useless, and unprofitable; and the man that boasts of his faith, and has no works to show it, he calls a vain man, an empty one, sounding brass, and a tinkling cymbal; empty vessels make the greatest sound; such are proud boasters, vainly puffed up by their fleshly mind; but are empty of the true knowledge of God, and of the faith of Christ, and of the grace of the Spirit: the Syriac version renders it, O weak, or feeble man, as he must needs be, whose faith is dead, and boasts of such a lifeless thing; and the Ethiopic version renders it, O foolish man, for such an one betrays his ignorance in spiritual things, whatever conceit he has of his knowledge and understanding: the character seems levelled against the Gnostics, who were swelled with a vain opinion of their knowledge, to whom the apostle addresses himself thus. The phrase, vain man, is a proper interpretation of the word aqyr , Raca, or Reka, used in ( Matthew 5:22), (see Gill on Matthew 5:22), which though not to be said to a man in an angry way, yet may be applied to men of such a character as here described; who were empty of solid good, and yet boasted of their knowledge. Wilt thou know? dost thou require proofs, that faith, without works, is dead ? as in ( James 2:17) and that true faith has always works accompanying it, and is shown and known by it? then take the following instances.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 14-26 - Those are wrong who put a mere notional belief of the
    gospel for the whole of evangelical religion, as many now do. No doubt, true fait alone, whereby men have part in Christ's righteousness, atonement, an grace, saves their souls; but it produces holy fruits, and is shown to be real by its effect on their works; while mere assent to any form of doctrine, or mere historical belief of any facts, wholly differs from this saving faith. A bare profession may gain the good opinion of piou people; and it may procure, in some cases, worldly good things; but what profit will it be, for any to gain the whole world, and to los their souls? Can this faith save him? All things should be accounte profitable or unprofitable to us, as they tend to forward or hinder the salvation of our souls. This place of Scripture plainly shows that a opinion, or assent to the gospel, without works, is not faith. There is no way to show we really believe in Christ, but by being diligent in good works, from gospel motives, and for gospel purposes. Men may boas to others, and be conceited of that which they really have not. Ther is not only to be assent in faith, but consent; not only an assent to the truth of the word, but a consent to take Christ. True believing is not an act of the understanding only, but a work of the whole heart That a justifying faith cannot be without works, is shown from tw examples, Abraham and Rahab. Abraham believed God, and it was reckone unto him for righteousness. Faith, producing such works, advanced his to peculiar favours. We see then, ver. #(24), how that by works a ma is justified, not by a bare opinion or profession, or believing withou obeying; but by having such faith as produces good works. And to have to deny his own reason, affections, and interests, is an action fit to try a believer. Observe here, the wonderful power of faith in changin sinners. Rahab's conduct proved her faith to be living, or havin power; it showed that she believed with her heart, not merely by a assent of the understanding. Let us then take heed, for the best works without faith, are dead; they want root and principle. By faith an thing we do is really good; as done in obedience to God, and aiming a his acceptance: the root is as though it were dead, when there is n fruit. Faith is the root, good works are the fruits; and we must see to it that we have both. This is the grace of God wherein we stand, and we should stand to it. There is no middle state. Every one must eithe live God's friend, or God's enemy. Living to God, as it is the consequence of faith, which justifies and will save, obliges us to d nothing against him, but every thing for him and to him __________________________________________________________________


    Greek Textus Receptus


    θελεις
    2309 5719 δε 1161 γνωναι 1097 5629 ω 5599 ανθρωπε 444 κενε 2756 οτι 3754 η 3588 πιστις 4102 χωρις 5565 των 3588 εργων 2041 νεκρα 3498 εστιν 2076 5748

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    20.
    Vain (kene). Lit., empty, without spiritual life.

    Dead (nekra). But the best texts read ajrgh, idle; as of money which yields no interest, or of land lying fallow.



    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

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