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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - John 19:1


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    King James Bible - John 19:1

    Then Pilate therefore took Jesus, and scourged him.

    World English Bible

    So Pilate then took Jesus, and flogged him.

    Douay-Rheims - John 19:1

    THEN therefore, Pilate took Jesus, and scourged him.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Then Pilate therefore took Jesus, and scourged him.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    τοτε
    5119 ADV ουν 3767 CONJ ελαβεν 2983 5627 V-2AAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM πιλατος 4091 N-NSM τον 3588 T-ASM ιησουν 2424 N-ASM και 2532 CONJ εμαστιγωσεν 3146 5656 V-AAI-3S

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (1) -
    Mt 27:26 *etc:

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 19:1

    ¶ Así que, entonces tom Pilato a Jess, y le azot.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - John 19:1

    Verse 1.
    Pilate took Jesus, and scourged him.] That is, caused him to be scourged: for we cannot with Bede suppose that he scourged him with his own hand.

    As our Lord was scourged by order of Pilate, it is probable he was scourged in the Roman manner, which was much more severe than that of the Jews. The latter never gave more than thirty-nine blows; for the law had absolutely forbidden a man to be abused, or his flesh cut in this chastisement, Deut. xxv. 3. The common method of whipping or flogging in some places, especially that of a military kind, is a disgrace to the nation where it is done, to the laws, and to humanity. See Matt. xxvii. 26, and the note there. Though it was customary to scourge the person who was to be crucified, yet it appears that Pilate had another end in view by scourging our Lord. He hoped that this would have satisfied the Jews, and that he might then have dismissed Jesus. This appears from Luke xxiii. 16.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 1. Then Pilate therefore took Jesus , etc.] Finding that the Jews would not agree to his release, but that Barabbas was the person they chose, and being very desirous, if possible, to save his life, thought of this method: he ordered Jesus to be taken by the proper officers, and scourged him ; that is, commanded him to be scourged by them; which was done by having him to a certain place, where being stripped naked, and fastened to a pillar, he was severely whipped: and this he did, hoping the Jews would be satisfied therewith, and agree to his release; but though he did this with such a view, yet it was a very unjust action in him to scourge a man that he himself could find no fault in: however, it was what was foretold by Christ himself, and was an emblem of those strokes and scourges of divine justice he endured, as the surety of his people, in his soul, in their stead; and his being scourged, though innocent, shows, that it was not for his own, but the sins of others; and expresses the vile nature of sin, the strictness of justice, and the grace, condescension, and patience of Christ: and this may teach us not to think it strange that any of the saints should endure scourgings, in a literal sense; and to bear patiently the scourgings and chastisements of our heavenly Father, and not to fear the overflowing scourge or wrath of God, since Christ has bore this in our room.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-18 - Little did
    Pilate think with what holy regard these sufferings of Christ would, in after-ages, be thought upon and spoken of by the bes and greatest of men. Our Lord Jesus came forth, willing to be expose to their scorn. It is good for every one with faith, to behold Chris Jesus in his sufferings. Behold him, and love him; be still lookin unto Jesus. Did their hatred sharpen their endeavours against him? an shall not our love for him quicken our endeavours for him and his kingdom? Pilate seems to have thought that Jesus might be some perso above the common order. Even natural conscience makes men afraid of being found fighting against God. As our Lord suffered for the sin both of Jews and Gentiles, it was a special part of the counsel of Divine Wisdom, that the Jews should first purpose his death, and the Gentiles carry that purpose into effect. Had not Christ been thu rejected of men, we had been for ever rejected of God. Now was the So of man delivered into the hands of wicked and unreasonable men. He wa led forth for us, that we might escape. He was nailed to the cross, a a Sacrifice bound to the altar. The Scripture was fulfilled; he did no die at the altar among the sacrifices, but among criminals sacrifice to public justice. And now let us pause, and with faith look upo Jesus. Was ever sorrow like unto his sorrow? See him bleeding, see his dying, see him and love him! love him, and live to him!


    Greek Textus Receptus


    τοτε
    5119 ADV ουν 3767 CONJ ελαβεν 2983 5627 V-2AAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM πιλατος 4091 N-NSM τον 3588 T-ASM ιησουν 2424 N-ASM και 2532 CONJ εμαστιγωσεν 3146 5656 V-AAI-3S

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    1.
    Scourged (emastigwsen). Matthew and Mark use the Greek form of the Latin word flagellare, fragellow, which occurs only in those two instances in the New Testament. John uses the more common Greek word, though he has fragellion (flagellum), scourge, at ii. 15. Matthew and Mark, however, both use mastigow elsewhere (Matt. x. 17; xx. 29; Mark x. 34). Its kindred noun, mastix, occurs several times in the metaphorical sense of a plague. See on Mark iii. 10, and compare Mark v. 29, 34; Luke vii. 21. The verb is used metaphorically only once, Hebrews xii. 6. Scourging was the legal preliminary to crucifixion, but, in this case, was inflicted illegally before the sentence of crucifixion was pronounced, with a view of averting the extreme punishment, and of satisfying the Jews. (Luke xxiii. 22). The punishment was horrible, the victim being bound to a low pillar or stake, and beaten, either with rods, or, in the case of slaves and provincials, with scourges, called scorpions, leather thongs tipped with leaden balls or sharp spikes. The severity of the infliction in Jesus' case is evident from His inability to bear His cross.


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