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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Philemon 1:12


    CHAPTERS: 1     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25

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    King James Bible - Philemon 1:12

    Whom I have sent again: thou therefore receive him, that is, mine own bowels:

    World English Bible

    I am
    sending him back. Therefore receive him, that is, my own heart,

    Douay-Rheims - Philemon 1:12

    Whom I have sent back to thee. And do thou receive him as my own bowels.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Whom I have sent again: thou therefore receive him, that is, my own bowels:

    Greek Textus Receptus


    ον
    3739 ανεπεμψα 375 5656 συ 4771 δε 1161 αυτον 846 τουτ 5124 εστιν 2076 5748 τα 3588 εμα 1699 σπλαγχνα 4698 προσλαβου 4355 5640

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (12) -
    Mt 6:14,15; 18:21-35 Mr 11:25 Eph 4:32

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 1:12

    el cual te vuelvo a enviar; t pues, recíbele como a mí mismo.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Philemon 1:12

    Verse 12. Whom I have sent again] The
    Christian religion never cancels any civil relations; a slave, on being converted, and becoming a free man of Christ, has no right to claim, on that ground, emancipation from the service of his master. Justice, therefore, required St. Paul to send back Onesimus to his master, and conscience obliged Onesimus to agree in the propriety of the measure; but love to the servant induced the apostle to write this conciliating letter to the master.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 12. Whom I have sent again , &c.] From
    Rome to Colosse, or to Philemon, wherever he was, along with this epistle: thou therefore receive him, that is, mine own bowels ; meaning his son, who, in a spiritual sense, came out of his bowels, to whom he stood in the relation of a spiritual father; so the Syriac version renders it, as my son, so receive him; (see Genesis 15:4 2 Samuel 16:11) and for whom he had a most strong affection, and tender regard; his bowels yearned for him, and he suggests by this expression, that should he reject him, it would give him the utmost pain and uneasiness; and he should be obliged to cry out as the Prophet Jeremy did, my bowels, my bowels, I am pained at the very heart; ( Jeremiah 4:19) wherefore he entreats him to receive him again into his house and family, into his service, and into his heart and affections, where the apostle had received him.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 8-14 - It does not lower any one to
    condescend, and sometimes even to beseech where, in strictness of right, we might command: the apostle argue from love, rather than authority, in behalf of one converted throug his means; and this was Onesimus. In allusion to that name, whic signifies "profitable," the apostle allows that in time past he ha been unprofitable to Philemon, but hastens to mention the change by which he had become profitable. Unholy persons are unprofitable; the answer not the great end of their being. But what happy change conversion makes! of evil, good; of unprofitable, useful. Religiou servants are treasures in a family. Such will make conscience of their time and trusts, and manage all they can for the best. No prospect of usefulness should lead any to neglect their obligations, or to fail in obedience to superiors. One great evidence of true repentance consist in returning to practise the duties which have been neglected. In his unconverted state, Onesimus had withdrawn, to his master's injury; but now he had seen his sin and repented, he was willing and desirous to return to his duty. Little do men know for what purposes the Lor leaves some to change their situations, or engage in undertakings perhaps from evil motives. Had not the Lord overruled some of ou ungodly projects, we may reflect upon cases, in which our destructio must have been sure.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    ον
    3739 ανεπεμψα 375 5656 συ 4771 δε 1161 αυτον 846 τουτ 5124 εστιν 2076 5748 τα 3588 εμα 1699 σπλαγχνα 4698 προσλαβου 4355 5640

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    12. I have sent again (anepemya). Rev., sent back. The epistolary aorist, see on
    1 Pet. v. 12. Our idiom would be I send back. That Onesimus accompanied the letter appears from Col. iv. 7-9. Thou therefore receive. Omit, and render aujton him as Rev., in his own person; his very self.

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    1:12 {I have sent back} (anepempsa). Epistolary aorist. As it will look when Onesimus arrives. {In his own person} (auton). "Himself," intensive pronoun with hon (whom). {My very
    heart} (ta ema splagcna). As in verse #7. He almost loves Onesimus as his own son.


    CHAPTERS: 1
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25

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