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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Revelation 18:22


    CHAPTERS: Revelation 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22     

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    King James Bible - Revelation 18:22

    And the voice of harpers, and musicians, and of pipers, and trumpeters, shall be heard no more at all in thee; and no craftsman, of whatsoever craft he be, shall be found any more in thee; and the sound of a millstone shall be heard no more at all in thee;

    World English Bible

    The
    voice of harpists, minstrels, flute players, and trumpeters will be heard no more at all in you. No craftsman, of whatever craft, will be found any more at all in you. The sound of a mill will be heard no more at all in you.

    Douay-Rheims - Revelation 18:22

    And the
    voice of harpers, and of musicians, and of them that play on the pipe, and on the trumpet, shall no more be heard at all in thee; and no craftsman of any art whatsoever shall be found any more at all in thee; and the sound of the mill shall be heard no more at all in thee;

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And the
    voice of harpers, and musicians, and of pipers, and trumpeters, shall be no more heard in thee; and no artificer, of whatever craft he be, shall be found any more in thee; and the sound of a millstone shall be no more heard in thee;

    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 φωνη 5456 κιθαρωδων 2790 και 2532 μουσικων 3451 και 2532 αυλητων 834 και 2532 σαλπιστων 4538 ου 3756 μη 3361 ακουσθη 191 5686 εν 1722 σοι 4671 ετι 2089 και 2532 πας 3956 τεχνιτης 5079 πασης 3956 τεχνης 5078 ου 3756 μη 3361 ευρεθη 2147 5686 εν 1722 σοι 4671 ετι 2089 και 2532 φωνη 5456 μυλου 3458 ου 3756 μη 3361 ακουσθη 191 5686 εν 1722 σοι 4671 ετι 2089

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (22) -
    Isa 24:8,9 Jer 7:34; 16:9; 25:10; 33:11 Eze 26:13

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 18:22

    Y voz de taedores de arpas, y de msicos, y de taedores de flautas y de trompetas, no ser ms oída en ti; y todo artífice de cualquier oficio, no ser ms hallado en ti; y voz de muela no ser ms en ti oído;

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Revelation 18:22

    Verse 22. The
    voice of harpers, &c.] This seems to indicate not only a total destruction of influence, &c., but also of being. It seems as if this city was to be swallowed up by an earthquake, or burnt up by fire from heaven.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 22. And the
    voice of harpers, and musicians, and of pipers and trumpeters , etc.] Which were for mirth, delight, and pleasure: shall be heard no more at all in thee : the words seem to be taken from ( Isaiah 24:8 Ezekiel 26:13) and may not only regard the loss of every thing that was delightful and pleasant to the ear in private houses, at festivals, and nuptials, and the like, but the ceasing of church music; there will be no more bells, nor organs, or any other instruments of music; no more chanters, and sub-chanters, choristers, singing men and boys: and no craftsman, of whatsoever craft he be shall be, found any more in thee ; which are very useful and necessary in cities and societies; it is threatened to Judah, that the cunning artificer should be taken from her, ( Isaiah 3:3) and it is reckoned as a considerable part of the distress of the captivity that the carpenters and smiths were away from Jerusalem, ( Jeremiah 24:1) and this judgment may fall on Rome for her worshipping idols of gold, silver, brass, stone, and wood, the works of men's hands, artificers and craftsmen, and who are employed in making other trinkets and wares for antichrist: and the sound of a millstone shall be heard no more at all in thee ; to grind corn with, (see Jeremiah 25:10) there will be a famine at the time that Rome is besieged, ( Revelation 18:8) and after it is destroyed, there will be no corn to grind, nor inhabitants to eat it, and so no use of the millstone; this is said in opposition to her luxurious and delicious living, ( Revelation 18:3,7,9) and this may also refer to feasts and rich entertainments, for which spices were ground and prepared by an hand mill in the house; and so may signify here that there would be no more of such entertainments and rich living; with which sense agrees what follows.

    This clause is wanting in the Syriac and Ethiopic versions.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 20-24 - That which is matter of rejoicing to the servants of God on earth, i matter of rejoicing to the angels in heaven. The apostles, who ar honoured and daily worshipped at Rome in an idolatrous manner, wil rejoice in her fall. The fall of Babylon was an act of God's justice And because it was a final ruin, this enemy should never molest the any more; of this they were assured by a sign. Let us take warning from the things which brought others to destruction, and let us set ou affections on things above, when we consider the changeable nature of earthly things __________________________________________________________________


    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ φωνη 5456 N-NSF κιθαρωδων 2790 N-GPM και 2532 CONJ μουσικων 3451 A-GPM και 2532 CONJ αυλητων 834 N-GPM και 2532 CONJ σαλπιστων 4538 N-GPM ου 3756 PRT-N μη 3361 PRT-N ακουσθη 191 5686 V-APS-3S εν 1722 PREP σοι 4671 P-2DS ετι 2089 ADV και 2532 CONJ πας 3956 A-NSM τεχνιτης 5079 N-NSM πασης 3956 A-GSF τεχνης 5078 N-GSF ου 3756 PRT-N μη 3361 PRT-N ευρεθη 2147 5686 V-APS-3S εν 1722 PREP σοι 4671 P-2DS ετι 2089 ADV και 2532 CONJ φωνη 5456 N-NSF μυλου 3458 N-GSM ου 3756 PRT-N μη 3361 PRT-N ακουσθη 191 5686 V-APS-3S εν 1722 PREP σοι 4671 P-2DS ετι 2089 ADV

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    22.
    Harpers. See on ch. xiv. 2.

    Musicians (mousikwn) Only here in the New Testament. There seems to be no special reason for changing the rendering to minstrels, as Rev. The term music had a much wider signification among the Greeks than that which we attach to it. "The primitive education at Athens consisted of two branches: gymnastics for the body, music for the mind. Music comprehended from the beginning everything appertaining to the province of the nine Muses; not merely learning the use of the lyre or how to bear part in a chorus, but also the hearing, learning, and repeating of poetical compositions, as wel as the practice of exact and elegant pronunciation - which latter accomplishment, in a language like the Greek, with long words, measured syllables, and great diversity of accentuation between one word and another, must have been far more difficult to acquire than it is in any modern European language. As the range of ideas enlarged, so the words music and musical teachers acquired an expanded meanings so as to comprehend matter of instruction at once ampler and more diversified. During the middle of the fifth century B.C. at Athens, there came thus to be found among the musical teachers men of the most distinguished abilities and eminence, masters of all the learning and accomplishments of the age, teaching what was known of Astronomy, Geography, and Physics, and capable of holding dialectical discussions with their pupils upon all the various problems then afloat among intellectual men" (Grote, "History of Greece," vi., ch. lxvii.).

    Pipers (aulhtwn). Rev., flute-players. Only here and Matt. ix. 23. The female flute-players, usually dissolute characters, were indispensable attendants at the Greek banquets. Plato makes Eryximachus in "the Symposium," say: "I move that the flute-girl who has just made her appearance, be told to go away and play to herself, or, if she likes, to the women who are within. Today let us have conversation instead" (" Symposium," 176). Again, Socrates says: "The talk about the poets seems to me like a commonplace entertainment to which a vulgar company have recourse; who, because they are not able to converse and amuse one another, while they are drinking, with the sound of their own voices and conversation, by reason of their stupidity, raise the price of flute-girls in the market, hiring for a great sum the voice of a flute instead of their own breath, to be the medium of intercourse among them" (Protagoras," 347). Compare Isa. xxiv. 8; Ezek. xxvi. 13.

    Millstone. Compare Jer. xxv. 10; Matt. xxiv. 41.



    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24

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