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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Jeremiah 25:14


    CHAPTERS: Jeremiah 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Jeremiah 25:14

    α 1 3739 επροφητευσεν ιερεμιας επι 1909 τα 3588 εθνη 1484 τα 3588 αιλαμ

    Douay Rheims Bible

    For they have served them, whereas they were many nations, and great kings: and I will repay them according to their deeds, and according to the works of their hands.

    King James Bible - Jeremiah 25:14

    For many nations and great kings shall serve themselves of them also: and I will recompense them according to their deeds, and according to the works of their own hands.

    World English Bible

    For many nations and great kings shall make bondservants of them, even of them; and I will recompense them according to their deeds, and according to the
    work of their hands.

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Jeremiah 25:14

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-01 v.vii.i Pg 6
    Isa. v. 26, Isa. xlix. 22.

    for all ages, through His resurrection, to all His holy and faithful [followers], whether among Jews or Gentiles, in the one body of His Church.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 27
    Isa. v. 26.

    swiftly, because hastening towards the fulness of the times; with speed, because unclogged by the weights of the ancient law. They shall neither hunger nor thirst. Therefore they shall be filled,—a promise which is made to none but those who hunger and thirst. And again He says: “Behold, my servants shall be filled, but ye shall be hungry; behold, my servants shall drink, but ye shall be thirsty.”3959

    3959


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 42
    Vel: or, “if you please;” indicating some uncertainty in the quotation. The passage is more like Jer. xv. 14 than anything in Isaiah (see, however, Isa. xxx. 27; 30).

    by Isaiah, “A fire has been kindled in mine anger.” He cannot lie. If it is not He who uttered His voice out of even the burning bush, it can be of no importance4691

    4691 Viderit.

    what fire you insist upon being understood.  Even if it be but figurative fire, yet, from the very fact that he takes from my element illustrations for His own sense, He is mine, because He uses what is mine. The similitude of fire must belong to Him who owns the reality thereof. But He will Himself best explain the quality of that fire which He mentioned, when He goes on to say, “Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, Nay; but rather division.”4692

    4692


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-01 v.vii.i Pg 6
    Isa. v. 26, Isa. xlix. 22.

    for all ages, through His resurrection, to all His holy and faithful [followers], whether among Jews or Gentiles, in the one body of His Church.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 27
    Isa. v. 26.

    swiftly, because hastening towards the fulness of the times; with speed, because unclogged by the weights of the ancient law. They shall neither hunger nor thirst. Therefore they shall be filled,—a promise which is made to none but those who hunger and thirst. And again He says: “Behold, my servants shall be filled, but ye shall be hungry; behold, my servants shall drink, but ye shall be thirsty.”3959

    3959


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 42
    Vel: or, “if you please;” indicating some uncertainty in the quotation. The passage is more like Jer. xv. 14 than anything in Isaiah (see, however, Isa. xxx. 27; 30).

    by Isaiah, “A fire has been kindled in mine anger.” He cannot lie. If it is not He who uttered His voice out of even the burning bush, it can be of no importance4691

    4691 Viderit.

    what fire you insist upon being understood.  Even if it be but figurative fire, yet, from the very fact that he takes from my element illustrations for His own sense, He is mine, because He uses what is mine. The similitude of fire must belong to Him who owns the reality thereof. But He will Himself best explain the quality of that fire which He mentioned, when He goes on to say, “Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, Nay; but rather division.”4692

    4692


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 141


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxii Pg 7
    Isa. lii. 11.

    For already had the Lord, according to the preceding words (of the prophet), revealed His Holy One with His arm, that is to say, Christ by His mighty power, in the eyes of the nations, so that all the3405

    3405 Universæ.

    nations and the utmost parts of the earth have seen the salvation, which was from God. By thus departing from Judaism itself, when they exchanged the obligations and burdens of the law for the liberty of the gospel, they were fulfilling the psalm, “Let us burst their bonds asunder, and cast away their yoke from us;” and this indeed (they did) after that “the heathen raged, and the people imagined vain devices;” after that “the kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers took their counsel together against the Lord, and against His Christ.”3406

    3406


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xviii Pg 22
    Isa. lii. 11; quoted in 2 Cor. vi. 17.

    (The apostle says further:) “Be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess,”6023

    6023


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 141


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxii Pg 7
    Isa. lii. 11.

    For already had the Lord, according to the preceding words (of the prophet), revealed His Holy One with His arm, that is to say, Christ by His mighty power, in the eyes of the nations, so that all the3405

    3405 Universæ.

    nations and the utmost parts of the earth have seen the salvation, which was from God. By thus departing from Judaism itself, when they exchanged the obligations and burdens of the law for the liberty of the gospel, they were fulfilling the psalm, “Let us burst their bonds asunder, and cast away their yoke from us;” and this indeed (they did) after that “the heathen raged, and the people imagined vain devices;” after that “the kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers took their counsel together against the Lord, and against His Christ.”3406

    3406


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xviii Pg 22
    Isa. lii. 11; quoted in 2 Cor. vi. 17.

    (The apostle says further:) “Be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess,”6023

    6023


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xii Pg 26
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Behold how David calleth Him Lord and the Son of God.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 3
    The reference is to Isa. xlv. 1. A glance at the LXX. will at once explain the difference between the reading of our author and the genuine reading. One letter—an “ι”—makes all the difference. For Κύρῳ has been read Κυρίῳ. In the Eng. ver. we read “His Anointed.”

    whose right hand I have holden, that the nations may hear Him: the powers of kings will I burst asunder; I will open before Him the gates, and the cities shall not be closed to Him.” Which very thing we see fulfilled. For whose right hand does God the Father hold but Christ’s, His Son?—whom all nations have heard, that is, whom all nations have believed,—whose preachers, withal, the apostles, are pointed to in the Psalms of David: “Into the universal earth,” says he, “is gone out their sound, and unto the ends of the earth their words.”1219

    1219


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 18
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Likewise, in the same prophet, He says to the Father respecting the Son: “Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed? We brought a report concerning Him, as if He were a little child, as if He were a root in a dry ground, who had no form nor comeliness.”7891

    7891


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 12
    Here Tertullian reads τῷ Χριστῷ μου Κυρίῳ, instead of Κύρῳ, “to Cyrus,” in Isa. xlv. 1.

    the Lord who speaks to the Father of Christ must be a distinct Being. Moreover, when the apostle in his epistle prays, “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and of knowledge,”8172

    8172


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 6
    See Isa. xlv. 1, 2 (especially in Lowth’s version and the LXX.).

    opened. Although there be withal a spiritual sense to be affixed to these expressions,—that the hearts of individuals, blockaded in various ways by the devil, are unbarred by the faith of Christ,—still they have been evidently fulfilled, inasmuch as in all these places dwells the “people” of the Name of Christ. For who could have reigned over all nations but Christ, God’s Son, who was ever announced as destined to reign over all to eternity? For if Solomonreigned,” why, it was within the confines of Judea merely:  “from Beersheba unto Dan” the boundaries of his kingdom are marked.1222

    1222


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 7
    Isa. xlv. 2, 3.

    And “He shall dwell in a lofty cave of the strong rock.”1597

    1597


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.iv Pg 9.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.x Pg 13.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 18
    Isa. xlv. 3, Sept.

    And again:  “Who else shall scatter the tokens of ventriloquists,4481

    4481 Ventriloquorum, Greek ἐγγαστριμύθων.

    and the devices of those who divine out of their own heart; turning wise men backward, and making their counsels foolish?”4482

    4482


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 6
    Isa. xlv. 3 (Septuagint).

    Now, that that god should have ever hidden anything who had never made a cover wherein to practise concealment, is in itself a wholly incredible idea. If he existed, concealment of himself was out of the question—to say nothing5430

    5430 Nedum.

    of any of his religious ordinances.5431

    5431 Sacramenta.

    The Creator, on the contrary, was as well known in Himself as His ordinances were.  These, we know, were publicly instituted5432

    5432 Palam decurrentia.

    in Israel; but they lay overshadowed with latent meanings, in which the wisdom of God was concealed,5433

    5433 Delitescebat.

    to be brought to light by and by amongst “the perfect,” when the time should come, but “pre-ordained in the counsels of God before the ages.”5434

    5434


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 33
    Isa. xlv. 3.

    Hence, then, came the exclamation, “O the depth of the riches and the wisdom of God!” For His treasures were now opening out. This is the purport of what Isaiah said, and of (the apostle’s own) subsequent quotation of the self-same passage, of the prophet: “Who hath known the mind of the Lord? or who hath been His counsellor? Who hath first given to Him, and it shall be recompensed to him again?”5868

    5868


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 25

    VERSE 	(14) - 

    Jer 27:7; 50:9,41; 51:6,27,28 Isa 14:2; 45:1-3 Da 5:28 Hab 2:8-16


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET