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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Psalms 21:1


    CHAPTERS: Psalms 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 148, 149, 150     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB

    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Psalms 20:2

    κυριε 2962 εν 1722 1520 τη 3588 δυναμει 1411 σου 4675 ευφρανθησεται ο 3588 3739 βασιλευς 935 και 2532 επι 1909 τω 3588 σωτηριω σου 4675 αγαλλιασεται σφοδρα 4970

    Douay Rheims Bible

    Unto the end. A psalm for David. In thy
    strength, O Lord, the king shall joy; and in thy salvation he shall rejoice exceedingly.

    King James Bible - Psalms 21:1

    The king shall joy in thy
    strength, O LORD; and in thy salvation how greatly shall he rejoice!

    World English Bible

    The king rejoices in your
    strength, Yahweh! How greatly he rejoices in your salvation!

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-08 vii.v.v Pg 3, Anf-08 vii.vi.vi Pg 3, Npnf-108 ii.CXXII Pg 5, Npnf-108 ii.XX Pg 1, Npnf-108 ii.XX Pg 9, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.iv.iii Pg 30, Npnf-206 v.LIII Pg 96, Npnf-206 v.VII Pg 14, Npnf-206 vi.vi.II Pg 319

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Psalms 20:2

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 176


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xv Pg 39.2


    Npnf-201 iii.xiii.xiii Pg 9


    Npnf-201 iv.vii.xviii Pg 37


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 237.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 12
    Ps. lxxi. 18.

    Also to the same purport in another Psalm: “O Lord, how are they increased that trouble me!”7885

    7885


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xvii Pg 2
    Gen. xvii. 9–11.

    This same does Ezekiel the prophet say with regard to the Sabbaths: “Also I gave them My Sabbaths, to be a sign between Me and them, that they might know that I am the Lord, that sanctify them.”3984

    3984


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 5
    There is, if the text be genuine, some confusion here.  Melchizedek does not appear to have been, in any sense, “subsequent” to Abraham, for he probably was senior to him; and, moreover, Abraham does not appear to have been “already circumcised” carnally when Melchizedek met him. Comp. Gen. xiv. with Gen. xvii.

    “But again,” (you say) “the son of Moses would upon one occasion have been choked by an angel, if Zipporah,1165

    1165


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 5
    There is, if the text be genuine, some confusion here.  Melchizedek does not appear to have been, in any sense, “subsequent” to Abraham, for he probably was senior to him; and, moreover, Abraham does not appear to have been “already circumcised” carnally when Melchizedek met him. Comp. Gen. xiv. with Gen. xvii.

    “But again,” (you say) “the son of Moses would upon one occasion have been choked by an angel, if Zipporah,1165

    1165


    Anf-03 v.viii.lxi Pg 3
    Ex. xxiv. 8.

    and Elias7750

    7750


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxxv Pg 14
    Gen. ii. 7.

    teaching us that by the participation of life the soul became alive; so that the soul, and the life which it possesses, must be understood as being separate existences. When God therefore bestows life and perpetual duration, it comes to pass that even souls which did not previously exist should henceforth endure [for ever], since God has both willed that they should exist, and should continue in existence. For the will of God ought to govern and rule in all things, while all other things give way to Him, are in subjection, and devoted to His service. Thus far, then, let me speak concerning the creation and the continued duration of the soul.


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxx Pg 3
    Gen. ii. 7.

    He thought, accordingly, that the man first so named existed before the man who was made, and that he who was formed of the earth was afterwards made according to the pre-existent form. And that man was formed of earth, Homer, too, having discovered from the ancient and divine history which says, “Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return,”2579

    2579


    Anf-01 viii.viii.vii Pg 5
    Gen. ii. 7.

    It is evident, therefore, that man made in the image of God was of flesh. Is it not, then, absurd to say, that the flesh made by God in His own image is contemptible, and worth nothing? But that the flesh is with God a precious possession is manifest, first from its being formed by Him, if at least the image is valuable to the former and artist; and besides, its value can be gathered from the creation of the rest of the world. For that on account of which the rest is made, is the most precious of all to the maker.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 2
    Gen. ii. 7.

    It was not angels, therefore, who made us, nor who formed us, neither had angels power to make an image of God, nor any one else, except the Word of the Lord, nor any Power remotely distant from the Father of all things. For God did not stand in need of these [beings], in order to the accomplishing of what He had Himself determined with Himself beforehand should be done, as if He did not possess His own hands. <index subject1="Word, the" subject2="always with the Father" title="487" id="ix.vi.xxi-p2.2"/>For with Him were always present the Word and Wisdom, the Son and the Spirit, by whom and in whom, freely and spontaneously, He made all things, to whom also He speaks, saying, “Let Us make man after Our image and likeness;”4064

    4064


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xvi Pg 10
    Gen. ii. 7.

    Wherefore also the Lord spat on the ground and made clay, and smeared it upon the eyes, pointing out the original fashioning [of man], how it was effected, and manifesting the hand of God to those who can understand by what [hand] man was formed out of the dust. For that which the artificer, the Word, had omitted to form in the womb, [viz., the blind man’s eyes], He then supplied in public, that the works of God might be manifested in him, in order that we might not be seeking out another hand by which man was fashioned, nor another Father; knowing that this hand of God which formed us at the beginning, and which does form us in the womb, has in the last times sought us out who were lost, winning back His own, and taking up the lost sheep upon His shoulders, and with joy restoring it to the fold of life.


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xix Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.ix Pg 14
    Gen. ii. 7.

    that God breathed into man’s nostrils the breath of life, and that man became thereby a living soul, not a life-giving spirit, has distinguished that soul from the condition of the Creator. The work must necessarily be distinct from the workman, and it is inferior to him.  The pitcher will not be the potter, although made by the potter; nor in like manner, will the afflatus, because made by the spirit, be on that account the spirit.  The soul has often been called by the same name as the breath. You should also take care that no descent be made from the breath to a still lower quality.  So you have granted (you say) the infirmity of the soul, which you denied before! Undoubtedly, when you demand for it an equality with God, that is, a freedom from fault, I contend that it is infirm. But when the comparison is challenged with an angel, I am compelled to maintain that the head over all things is the stronger of the two, to whom the angels are ministers,2825

    2825


    Anf-03 iv.xi.iii Pg 16
    Gen. ii. 7.

    —by that inspiration of God, of course. On this point, therefore, nothing further need be investigated or advanced by us. It has its own treatise,1521

    1521 Titulus.

    and its own heretic. I shall regard it as my introduction to the other branches of the subject.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxiv Pg 17
    םרָאָהָ, homo, from המָרַאְַהָ, humus, the ground; see the Hebrew of Gen. ii. 7.

    “And the Lord God made man of the dust of the ground,” not of spiritual essence; this afterwards came from the divine afflatus:  “and man became a living soul.”  What, then, is man? Made, no doubt of it, of the dust; and God placed him in paradise, because He moulded him, not breathed him, into being—a fabric of flesh, not of spirit. Now, this being the case, with what face will you contend for the perfect character of that goodness which did not fail in some one particular only of man’s deliverance, but in its general capacity? If that is a plenary grace and a substantial mercy which brings salvation to the soul alone, this were the better life which we now enjoy whole and entire; whereas to rise again but in part will be a chastisement, not a liberation.  The proof of the perfect goodness is, that man, after his rescue, should be delivered from the domicile and power of the malignant deity unto the protection of the most good and merciful GodPoor dupe of Marcion, fever2634

    2634 Febricitas.

    is hard upon you; and your painful flesh produces a crop of all sorts of briers and thorns. Nor is it only to the Creator’s thunderbolts that you lie exposed, or to wars, and pestilences, and His other heavier strokes, but even to His creeping insects. In what respect do you suppose yourself liberated from His kingdom when His flies are still creeping upon your face? If your deliverance lies in the future, why not also in the present, that it may be perfectly wrought? Far different is our condition in the sight of Him who is the Author, the Judge, the injured2635

    2635 Offensum, probably in respect of the Marcionite treatment of His attributes.

    Head of our race! You display Him as a merely good God; but you are unable to prove that He is perfectly good, because you are not by Him perfectly delivered.


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xxvi Pg 9
    Gen. ii. 7.

    Nor could God have known man in the womb, except in his entire nature: “And before thou camest forth out of the womb, I sanctified thee.”1693

    1693


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 9
    Gen. ii. 7.

    Now this is undoubtedly6373

    6373 Utique.

    the correct and fitting mode for the narrative.  First comes a prefatory statement, then follow the details in full;6374

    6374 Prosequi.

    first the subject is named, then it is described.6375

    6375 Primo præfari, postea prosequi; nominare, deinde describere. This properly is an abstract statement, given with Tertullian’s usual terseness: “First you should (‘decet’) give your preface, then follow up with details:  first name your subject, then describe it.”

    How absurd is the other view of the account,6376

    6376 Alioquin.

    when even before he6377

    6377 Hermogenes, whose view of the narrative is criticised.

    had premised any mention of his subject, i.e. Matter, without even giving us its name, he all on a sudden promulged its form and condition, describing to us its quality before mentioning its existence,—pointing out the figure of the thing formed, but concealing its name! But how much more credible is our opinion, which holds that Scripture has only subjoined the arrangement of the subject after it has first duly described its formation and mentioned its name!  Indeed, how full and complete6378

    6378 Integer.

    is the meaning of these words: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth; but6379

    6379 Autem.

    the earth was without form, and void,”6380

    6380


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxi Pg 12
    Gen. ii. 7.

    Now, although it here mentions the nostrils,6453

    6453 Both in the quotation and here, Tertullian read “faciem” where we read “nostrils.”

    it does not say that they were made by God; so again it speaks of skin6454

    6454 Cutem: another reading has “costam,” rib.

    and bones, and flesh and eyes, and sweat and blood, in subsequent passages,6455

    6455


    Anf-03 v.vii.xvii Pg 6
    Gen. ii. 7.

    As, then, the first Adam is thus introduced to us, it is a just inference that the second Adam likewise, as the apostle has told us, was formed by God into a quickening spirit out of the ground,—in other words, out of a flesh which was unstained as yet by any human generation. But that I may lose no opportunity of supporting my argument from the name of Adam, why is Christ called Adam by the apostle, unless it be that, as man, He was of that earthly origin? And even reason here maintains the same conclusion, because it was by just the contrary7184

    7184 Æmula.

    operation that God recovered His own image and likeness, of which He had been robbed by the devil. For it was while Eve was yet a virgin, that the ensnaring word had crept into her ear which was to build the edifice of death. Into a virgin’s soul, in like manner, must be introduced that Word of God which was to raise the fabric of life; so that what had been reduced to ruin by this sex, might by the selfsame sex be recovered to salvation. As Eve had believed the serpent, so Mary believed the angel.7185

    7185 Literally, “Gabriel.”

    The delinquency which the one occasioned by believing, the other by believing effaced.  But (it will be said) Eve did not at the devil’s word conceive in her womb. Well, she at all events conceived; for the devil’s word afterwards became as seed to her that she should conceive as an outcast, and bring forth in sorrow.  Indeed she gave birth to a fratricidal devil; whilst Mary, on the contrary, bare one who was one day to secure salvation to Israel, His own brother after the flesh, and the murderer of Himself. God therefore sent down into the virgin’s womb His Word, as the good Brother, who should blot out the memory of the evil brother. Hence it was necessary that Christ should come forth for the salvation of man, in that condition of flesh into which man had entered ever since his condemnation.


    Anf-03 v.viii.v Pg 9
    Literally, “if he be known beyond the bishop.”

    than the bishop, he is ruined. <index subject1="Marriage" title="95" id="v.viii.v-p9.1"/>But it becomes both men and women who marry, to form their union with the approval of the bishop, that their marriage may be according to the Lord, and not after their own lust. Let all things be done to the honour of God.1098

    1098


    Anf-03 v.viii.liii Pg 5
    Compare ver. 45 with Gen. ii. 7.

    Now since Adam was the first man, since also the flesh was man prior to the soul7690

    7690 See this put more fully above, c. v., near the end.

    it undoubtedly follows that it was the flesh that became the living soul. Moreover, since it was a bodily substance that assumed this condition, it was of course the natural (or animate) body that became the living soul. By what designation would they have it called, except that which it became through the soul, except that which it was not previous to the soul, except that which it can never be after the soul, but through its resurrection? For after it has recovered the soul, it once more becomes the natural (or animate) body, in order that it may become a spiritual body. For it only resumes in the resurrection the condition which it once had. There is therefore by no means the same good reason why the soul should be called the natural (or animate) body, which the flesh has for bearing that designation. The flesh, in fact, was a body before it was an animate body. When the flesh was joined by the soul,7691

    7691 Animata.

    it then became the natural (or animate) body.  Now, although the soul is a corporeal substance,7692

    7692 See the De Anima, v.–ix., for a full statement of Tertullian’s view of the soul’s corporeality.

    yet, as it is not an animated body, but rather an animating one, it cannot be called the animate (or natural) body, nor can it become that thing which it produces. It is indeed when the soul accrues to something else that it makes that thing animate; but unless it so accrues, how will it ever produce animation?  As therefore the flesh was at first an animate (or natural) body on receiving the soul, so at last will it become a spiritual body when invested with the spirit. Now the apostle, by severally adducing this order in Adam and in Christ, fairly distinguishes between the two states, in the very essentials of their difference. And when he calls Christ “the last Adam,”7693

    7693


    Anf-03 v.viii.v Pg 10
    Comp. 1 Cor. x. 31.



    Anf-03 iv.ix.iv Pg 9
    I am not acquainted with any such passage. Oehler refers to Isa. xlix. in his margin, but gives no verse, and omits to notice this passage of the present treatise in his index.

    Thus, therefore, before this temporal sabbath, there was withal an eternal sabbath foreshown and foretold; just as before the carnal circumcision there was withal a spiritual circumcision foreshown. In short, let them teach us, as we have already premised, that Adam observed the sabbath; or that Abel, when offering to God a holy victim, pleased Him by a religious reverence for the sabbath; or that Enoch, when translated, had been a keeper of the sabbath; or that Noah the ark-builder observed, on account of the deluge, an immense sabbath; or that Abraham, in observance of the sabbath, offered Isaac his son; or that Melchizedek in his priesthood received the law of the sabbath.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iv Pg 9
    I am not acquainted with any such passage. Oehler refers to Isa. xlix. in his margin, but gives no verse, and omits to notice this passage of the present treatise in his index.

    Thus, therefore, before this temporal sabbath, there was withal an eternal sabbath foreshown and foretold; just as before the carnal circumcision there was withal a spiritual circumcision foreshown. In short, let them teach us, as we have already premised, that Adam observed the sabbath; or that Abel, when offering to God a holy victim, pleased Him by a religious reverence for the sabbath; or that Enoch, when translated, had been a keeper of the sabbath; or that Noah the ark-builder observed, on account of the deluge, an immense sabbath; or that Abraham, in observance of the sabbath, offered Isaac his son; or that Melchizedek in his priesthood received the law of the sabbath.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxvi Pg 4
    Isa. lxii. 10 to end, Isa. lxiii. 1–6.



    Anf-02 vi.ii.xii Pg 16.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 10.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xl Pg 24
    Isa. lxiii. 1 (Sept. slightly altered).

    The prophetic Spirit contemplates the Lord as if He were already on His way to His passion, clad in His fleshly nature; and as He was to suffer therein, He represents the bleeding condition of His flesh under the metaphor of garments dyed in red, as if reddened in the treading and crushing process of the wine-press, from which the labourers descend reddened with the wine-juice, like men stained in blood.  Much more clearly still does the book of Genesis foretell this, when (in the blessing of Judah, out of whose tribe Christ was to come according to the flesh) it even then delineated Christ in the person of that patriarch,5092

    5092 In Juda.

    saying, “He washed His garments in wine, and His clothes in the blood of grapes5093

    5093


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.vii Pg 40.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 4.3


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 9
    Literally, “in hope of His faith.”

    <index subject1="Purification" title="139" id="vi.ii.iv-p9.1"/>Now, being desirous to write many things to you, not as your teacher, but as becometh one who loves you, I have taken care not to fail to write to you from what I myself possess, with a view to your purification.1476

    1476 The Greek is here incorrect and unintelligible; and as the Latin omits the clause, our translation is merely conjectural. Hilgenfeld’s text, if we give a somewhat peculiar meaning to ἐλλιπεῖν, may be translated: “but as it is becoming in one who loves you not to fail in giving you what we have, I, though the very offscouring of you, have been eager to write to you.”

    We take earnest1477

    1477 *title


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.vii Pg 57


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.iv Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxviii Pg 0


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 2.2


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 7
    “Eructavit cor. meum Sermonem optimum” is Tertullian’s reading of Ps. xlv. 1, “My heart is inditing a good matter,” A.V., which the Vulgate, Ps. xliv. 1, renders by “Eructavit cor meum verbum bonum,” and the Septuagint by ᾽Εξηρεύξατο ἡ καρδία μου λόγον ἀγαθόν. This is a tolerably literal rendering of the original words, בוֹט רבָרָ יבִּלִ שׁהַרָ. In these words the Fathers used to descry an adumbration of the mystery of the Son’s eternal generation from the Father, and His coming forth in time to create the world.  See Bellarmine, On the Psalms (Paris ed. 1861), vol. i. 292. The Psalm is no doubt eminently Messianic, as both Jewish and Christian writers have ever held. See Perowne, The Psalms, vol. i. p. 216.  Bishop Bull reviews at length the theological opinions of Tertullian, and shows that he held the eternity of the Son of God, whom he calls “Sermo” or “Verbum Dei.” See Defensio Fidei Nicænæ (translation in the “Oxford Library of the Fathers,” by the translator of this work) vol. ii. 509–545. In the same volume, p. 482, the passage from the Psalm before us is similarly applied by Novatian: “Sic Dei Verbum processit, de quo dictum est, Eructavit cor meum Verbum bonum.” [See vol. ii. p. 98, this series: and Kaye, p. 515.]

    Let Marcion take hence his first lesson on the noble fruit of this truly most excellent tree. But, like a most clumsy clown, he has grafted a good branch on a bad stock. The sapling, however, of his blasphemy shall be never strong: it shall wither with its planter, and thus shall be manifested the nature of the good tree. Look at the total result: how fruitful was the Word! God issued His fiat, and it was done: God also saw that it was good;2744

    2744


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 7
    Ps. xlv. 1. [And see Vol. I. p. 213, supra.]

    This will be that “very good word” of blessing which is admitted to be the initiating principle of the New Testament, after the example of the Old. What is there, then, to wonder at, if He entered on His ministry with the very attributes3940

    3940 Affectibus.

    of the Creator, who ever in language of the same sort loved, consoled, protected, and avenged the beggar, and the poor, and the humble, and the widow, and the orphan? So that you may believe this private bounty as it were of Christ to be a rivulet streaming from the springs of salvation. Indeed, I hardly know which way to turn amidst so vast a wealth of good words like these; as if I were in a forest, or a meadow, or an orchard of apples. I must therefore look out for such matter as chance may present to me.3941

    3941 Prout incidit.


    Anf-03 v.v.xviii Pg 24
    On this version of Ps. xlv. 1., and its application by Tertullian, see our Anti-Marcion (p. 299, note 5).

    ), I am not quite sure that evil may not be introduced by good, the stronger by the weak, in the same way as the unbegotten is by the begotten. Therefore on this ground Hermogenes puts Matter even before God, by putting it before the Son. Because the Son is the Word, and “the Word is God,”6313

    6313


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 10
    Ps. xlv. 1. See this reading, and its application, fully discussed in our note 5, p. 66, of the Anti-Marcion, Edin.

    The Father took pleasure evermore in Him, who equally rejoiced with a reciprocal gladness in the Father’s presence:  “Thou art my Son, to-day have I begotten Thee;”7831

    7831


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 4
    For this version of Ps. xlv. 1, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 66, note 5, Edin.

    so you in like manner ought to adduce in opposition to me some text where God has said, “My heart hath emitted Myself as my own most excellent Word,” in such a sense that He is Himself both the Emitter and the Emitted, both He who sent forth and He who was sent forth, since He is both the Word and God. I bid you also observe,7877

    7877 Ecce.

    that on my side I advance the passage where the Father said to the Son, “Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten Thee.”7878

    7878 *title *titles


    Anf-01 ix.iv.vii Pg 6
    Ps. l. 1.

    Who is meant by God? He of whom He has said, “God shall come openly, our God, and shall not keep silence;”3334

    3334


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxii Pg 4
    Ps. l. (in E. V.).

    Accordingly He neither takes sacrifices from you nor commanded them at first to be offered because they are needful to Him, but because of your sins. For indeed the temple, which is called the temple in Jerusalem, He admitted to be His house or court, not as though He needed it, but in order that you, in this view of it, giving yourselves to Him, might not worship idols. And that this is so, Isaiah says: ‘What house have ye built Me? saith the Lord. Heaven is My throne, and earth is My footstool.’2004

    2004 *titles *titles


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xiii Pg 12.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxvii Pg 23
    1 Sam. xii. 3.

    And when the people had said to him, “Thou hast not tyrannized, neither hast thou oppressed us neither hast thou taken ought of any man’s hand,” he called the Lord to witness, saying, “The Lord is witness, and His Anointed is witness this day, that ye have not found ought in my hand. And they said to him, He is witness.” In this strain also the Apostle Paul, inasmuch as he had a good conscience, said to the Corinthians: “For we are not as many, who corrupt the Word of God: but as of sincerity, but as of God, in the sight of God speak we in Christ;”4168

    4168


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xxxv Pg 3
    Isa. ix. 6.

    which is significant of the power of the cross, for to it, when He was crucified, He applied His shoulders, as shall be more clearly made out in the ensuing discourse. And again the same prophet Isaiah, being inspired by the prophetic Spirit, said, “I have spread out my hands to a disobedient and gainsaying people, to those who walk in a way that is not good. They now ask of me judgment, and dare to draw near to God.”1836

    1836


    Anf-01 v.xv.iii Pg 4
    Isa. ix. 6.

    And concerning His incarnation, “Behold, a virgin shall be with Child, and shall bring forth a Son; and they shall call his name Immanuel.”1227

    1227


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxvi Pg 2
    [Isa. ix. 6, according to LXX.]

    did he not foretell Him to be the Teacher of those truths which He did teach when He came [to earth]? For He alone taught openly those mighty counsels which the Father designed both for all those who have been and shall be well-pleasing to Him, and also for those who have rebelled against His will, whether men or angels, when He said: ‘They shall come from the east [and from the west2235

    2235 Not in all edd.

    ], and shall sit down with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, in the kingdom of heaven: but the children of the kingdom shall be cast out into outer darkness.’2236

    2236


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xvii Pg 17
    Isa. ix. 6 (LXX.).

    through whom God caused the day-spring and the Just One to arise to the house of David, and raised up for him an horn of salvation, “and established a testimony in Jacob;”3583

    3583


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xx Pg 16
    Isa. ix. 6.

    coming on the clouds as the Judge of all men;3679

    3679


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 64
    Isa. viii. 3, Isa. ix. 6, Isa. vii. 14. [A confusion of texts.]

    and those [of them] who proclaimed Him as Immanuel, [born] of the Virgin, exhibited the union of the Word of God with His own workmanship, [declaring] that the Word should become flesh, and the Son of God the Son of man (the pure One opening purely that pure womb which regenerates men unto God, and which He Himself made pure); and having become this which we also are, He [nevertheless] is the Mighty God, and possesses a generation which cannot be declared. And there are also some of them who say, “The Lord hath spoken in Zion, and uttered His voice from Jerusalem;”4305

    4305


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 40.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 43
    See Isa. ix. 6.

    What novelty is that, unless he is speaking of the “Son” of God?—and one is born to us the beginning of whose government has been made “on His shoulder.” What king in the world wears the ensign of his power on his shoulder, and does not bear either diadem on his head, or else sceptre in his hand, or else some mark of distinctive vesture? But the novel “King of ages,” Christ Jesus, alone reared “on His shoulder” His own novel glory, and power, and sublimity,—the cross, to wit; that, according to the former prophecy, the Lord thenceforth “might reign from the tree.” For of this tree likewise it is that God hints, through Jeremiah, that you would say, “Come, let us put wood1347

    1347 Lignum.

    into his bread, and let us wear him away out of the land of the living; and his name shall no more be remembered.”1348

    1348


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xix Pg 5
    Isa. ix. 6.

    But what is there unusual in this, unless he speaks of the Son of God? “To us is given He whose government is upon His shoulder.”3359

    3359


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xix Pg 6
    Isa. ix. 6.

    Now, what king is there who bears the ensign of his dominion upon his shoulder, and not rather upon his head as a diadem, or in his hand as a sceptre, or else as a mark in some royal apparel? But the one new King of the new ages, Jesus Christ, carried on His shoulder both the power and the excellence of His new glory, even His cross; so that, according to our former prophecy, He might thenceforth reign from the tree as Lord.  This tree it is which Jeremiah likewise gives you intimation of, when he prophesies to the Jews, who should say, “Come, let us destroy the tree with the fruit, (the bread) thereof,”3360

    3360


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 50


    Edersheim Bible History

    Lifetimes vii.x Pg 58.1, Lifetimes xi.ix Pg 77.1


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 20

    VERSE 	(1) - 

    Ps 2:6; 20:6,9; 63:11; 72:1,2 Isa 9:6,7 Mt 2:2

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET