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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Romans 6:12


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    King James Bible - Romans 6:12

    Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, that ye should obey it in the lusts thereof.

    World English Bible

    Therefore don't let sin reign in your mortal
    body, that you should obey it in its lusts.

    Douay-Rheims - Romans 6:12

    Let no sin therefore reign in your mortal
    body, so as to obey the lusts thereof.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal
    body, that ye should obey it in the lusts of it.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    μη
    3361 PRT-N ουν 3767 CONJ βασιλευετω 936 5720 V-PAM-3S η 3588 T-NSF αμαρτια 266 N-NSF εν 1722 PREP τω 3588 T-DSN θνητω 2349 A-DSN υμων 5216 P-2GP σωματι 4983 N-DSN εις 1519 PREP το 3588 T-ASN υπακουειν 5219 5721 V-PAN αυτη 846 P-DSF εν 1722 PREP ταις 3588 T-DPF επιθυμιαις 1939 N-DPF αυτου 846 P-GSN

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (12) -
    :16; 5:21; 7:23,24 Nu 33:55 De 7:2 Jos 23:12,13 Jud 2:3 Ps 19:13

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 6:12

    No reine, pues, el pecado en vuestro cuerpo mortal, para que lo obedezcis en sus concupiscencias;

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Romans 6:12

    Verse 12. Let not
    sin therefore reign] This is a prosopopoeia, or personification. Sin is represented as a king, ruler, or tyrant, who has the desires of the mind and the members of the body under his control so that by influencing the passions he governs the body. Do not let sin reign, do not let him work; that is, let him have no place, no being in your souls; because, wherever he is he governs, less or more: and indeed sin is not sin without this. How is sin known? By evil influences in the mind, and evil acts in the life. But do not these influences and these acts prove his dominion? Certainly, the very existence of an evil thought to which passion or appetite attaches itself, is a proof that there sin has dominion; for without dominion such passions could not be excited. Wherever sin is felt, there sin has dominion; for sin is sin only as it works in action or passion against God. Sin cannot be a quiescent thing: if it do not work it does not exist.

    That ye should obey it in the lusts thereof.] auth en taiv epiqumiaiv autou. This clause is wanting in the most ancient and reputable MSS. and in the principal versions. Griesbach has left it out of his text; and Professor White says, Certissime delenda: "These words should certainly he expunged" they are not necessary to the apostle's argument; it was enough to say, Let not sin reign in your mortal bodies, that ye should obey it. If it be there it will reign there; and its reign supposes, necessarily, the subjection of that in which it reigns. A king reigns when his laws are enforced, and the people obey them. When there is no executive government there is no reign. There may be a royal shadow there, but there is no king.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 12. Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body , etc..] Since grace reigns in you, sin should not: seeing ye are dead to sin, are baptized into the death of Christ, and are dead with him, and alive through him, sin therefore should not reign in you, and over you. This exhortation does not suppose a freewill power in man naturally, for this is spoken to persons, who had the Spirit and grace of Christ, and in whom God had wrought both to will and to do of his good pleasure; nor is this exhortation unnecessary to believers, though they are dead to sin, and though God has promised it shall not have the dominion over them, and though reigning sin, as divines say, cannot be in regenerate persons; for though they are entirely dead to sin as justified persons, yet not perfectly so as sanctified: they are indeed dead to sin, but sin is not dead in them; it struggles, it makes war, leads captive, and threatens absolute and universal dominion, wherefore such an exhortation is necessary; besides, though God has promised that sin shall not have the dominion, yet making use of means, such as prayer to God that it may not, striving against it, opposing it, in order to hinder its dominion, are no ways inconsistent with the promise of God, whose promises often have their accomplishment in the use of means: moreover, whereas some divines say, that reigning sin may be and others that it cannot be in regenerate persons, it should be observed, that if by reigning sin is meant, sinning against God out of malice and contempt, with the whole heart, without any struggle against it, or repentance for it, or so as to lose the grace of God, and never rise more, then it must be said that it cannot be in a regenerate man; but if by it is meant, falling into sin against their consciences, knowingly and willingly, so as to distress their minds, lose their peace, and grieve the Spirit of God, so as to be held under it, and be led captive by it, such power sin may have in them, and over them; and therefore the exhortation is not needless; and when the apostle says, let it not reign in your mortal body, by it is either meant the whole man, or rather the body only, which is the instrument of sinning, and is become mortal through sin; and being so, is a reason why it should not reign in it, since it has done so much mischief to it already: and this also denotes the time of sin's being in us, and of the danger of its reigning in us; it is only whilst we are in this mortal body; and the consideration of our mortality should quicken us to war against sin, and be careful not to obey it in the lusts thereof ; the lusts of the body, or flesh, which are therefore sometimes called fleshly lusts, are many, and have great power and influence; and may be said to be obeyed, when provision is made to fulfil them, when these are the business of a man's life, and the whole of his conversation is taken up in them, without struggle against them, or opposition to them; and heroin lies the reign of sin.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 11-15 - The strongest motives against
    sin, and to enforce holiness, are her stated. Being made free from the reign of sin, alive unto God, an having the prospect of eternal life, it becomes believers to be greatl concerned to advance thereto. But, as unholy lusts are not quite roote out in this life, it must be the care of the Christian to resist their motions, earnestly striving, that, through Divine grace, they may no prevail in this mortal state. Let the thought that this state will soo be at an end, encourage the true Christian, as to the motions of lusts which so often perplex and distress him. Let us present all our power to God, as weapons or tools ready for the warfare, and work of righteousness, in his service. There is strength in the covenant of grace for us. Sin shall not have dominion. God's promises to us ar more powerful and effectual for mortifying sin, than our promises to God. Sin may struggle in a real believer, and create him a great dea of trouble, but it shall not have dominion; it may vex him, but it shall not rule over him. Shall any take occasion from this encouragin doctrine to allow themselves in the practice of any sin? Far be suc abominable thoughts, so contrary to the perfections of God, and the design of his gospel, so opposed to being under grace. What can be stronger motive against sin than the love of Christ? Shall we sin against so much goodness, and such love?


    Greek Textus Receptus


    μη
    3361 PRT-N ουν 3767 CONJ βασιλευετω 936 5720 V-PAM-3S η 3588 T-NSF αμαρτια 266 N-NSF εν 1722 PREP τω 3588 T-DSN θνητω 2349 A-DSN υμων 5216 P-2GP σωματι 4983 N-DSN εις 1519 PREP το 3588 T-ASN υπακουειν 5219 5721 V-PAN αυτη 846 P-DSF εν 1722 PREP ταις 3588 T-DPF επιθυμιαις 1939 N-DPF αυτου 846 P-GSN

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    12.
    Reign (basileuetw). The antithesis implied is not between reigning and existing, but between reigning and being deposed.

    Body. Literal, thus according with members, ver: 13.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    6:12 {Reign} (basileuet"). Present active imperative, "let not Sin continue to reign" as it did once (#5:12). {Mortal} (thntoi). Verbal adjective from qneskw, subject to death. The reign of Sin is over with you. Self-indulgence is inconsistent with trust in the vicarious atonement. {That ye should obey} (eis to hupakouein). With a view to obeying.


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