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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Titus 2:11


    CHAPTERS: Titus 1, 2, 3     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

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    King James Bible - Titus 2:11

    For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men,

    World English Bible

    For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation to all
    men,

    Douay-Rheims - Titus 2:11

    For the grace of God our Savior hath appeared to all
    men;

    Webster's Bible Translation

    For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all
    men,

    Greek Textus Receptus


    επεφανη
    2014 5648 γαρ 1063 η 3588 χαρις 5485 του 3588 θεου 2316 η 3588 σωτηριος 4992 πασιν 3956 ανθρωποις 444

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (11) -
    Tit 3:4,5 Ps 84:11 Zec 4:7; 12:10 Joh 1:14,16,17 Ac 11:23

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 2:11

    ¶ Porque la gracia de Dios que trae salvacin, se manifest a todos los hombres.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Titus 2:11

    Verse 11. The
    grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men] epefanh gar h xariv tou qeou h swthriov pasin anqrwpoiv? Literally translated, the words stand thus: For the grace of God, that which saves, hath shone forth upon all men. Or, as it is expressed in the margin of our authorized version: The grace of God, that bringeth salvation to all men, hath appeared. As God's grace signifies God's favour, any benefit received from him may be termed God's grace. In this place, and in Col. i. 6, the Gospel, which points out God's infinite mercy to the world, is termed the grace of God; for it is not only a favour of infinite worth in itself, but it announces that greatest gift of God to man, the incarnation and atoning sacrifice of Jesus Christ. Now it cannot be said, except in a very refined and spiritual sense, that this Gospel had then appeared to all men; but it may be well said that it bringeth salvation to all men; this is its design; and it was to taste death for every man that its author came into the world. There is a beauty and energy in the word epefanh, hath shined out, that is rarely noted; it seems to be a metaphor taken from the sun. As by his rising in the east and shining out, he enlightens, successively, the whole world; so the Lord Jesus, who is called the Sun of righteousness, Mal. iv. 2, arises on the whole human race with healing in his wings. And as the light and heat of the sun are denied to no nation nor individual, so the grace of the Lord Jesus, this also shines out upon all; and God designs that all mankind shall be as equally benefited by it in reference to their souls, as they are in respect to their bodies by the sun that shines in the firmament of heaven. But as all the parts of the earth are not immediately illuminated, but come into the solar light successively, not only in consequence of the earth's diurnal revolution round its own axis, but in consequence of its annual revolution round its whole orbit; so this Sun of righteousness, who has shined out, is bringing every part of the habitable globe into his Divine light; that light is shining more and more to the perfect day; so that gradually and successively he is enlightening every nation, and every man; and, when his great year is filled up, every nation of the earth shall be brought into the light and heat of this unspotted, uneclipsed, and eternal Sun of righteousness and truth. Wherever the Gospel comes, it brings salvation - it offers deliverance from all sin to every soul that hears or reads it. As freely as the sun dispenses his genial influences to every inhabitant of the earth, so freely does Jesus Christ dispense the merits and blessings of his passion and death to every soul of man. From the influences of this spiritual Sun no soul is reprobated any more than from the influences of the natural sun. In both cases, only those who wilfully shut their eyes, and hide themselves in darkness, are deprived of the gracious benefit. It is no objection to this view of the subject, that whole nations have not yet received the Divine light. When the earth and the sun were created, every part of the globe did not come immediately into the light; to effect this purpose fully there must be a complete revolution, as has been marked above, and this could not be effected till the earth had not only revolved on its own axis, but passed successively through all the signs of the zodiac. When its year was completed, and not till then, every part had its due proportion of light and heat. God may, in his infinite wisdom, have determined the times and the seasons for the full manifestation of the Gospel to the nations of the world, as he has done in reference to the solar light; and when the Jews are brought in with the fullness of the Gentiles, then, and not till then, can we say that the grand revolution of the important YEAR of the Sun of righteousness is completed. But, in the meantime, the unenlightened parts of the earth are not left in total darkness; as there was light " - ere the infant sun Was rolled together, or had tried his beams Athwart the gloom profound;" light being created, and in a certain measure dispersed, at least three whole days before the sun was formed; (for his creation was a part of the fourth day's work;) so, previously to the incarnation of Christ, there was spiritual light in the world; for he diffused his beams while his orb was yet unseen. And even now, where by the preaching of his Gospel he is not yet manifested, he is that true light which enlightens every man coming into the world; so that the moral world is no more left to absolute darkness, where the Gospel is not yet preached, than the earth was the four days which preceded the creation of the sun, or those parts of the world are where the Gospel has not yet been preached. The great year is rolling on, and all the parts of the earth are coming successively, and now rapidly, into the light. The vast revolution seems to be nearly completed, and the whole world is about to be filled with the light and glory of God. A heathen poet, apparently under the inspiration of God (for God has his witnesses every where) speaks of those glorious times in words and numbers which nothing but the Spirit of God can equal. It gratifies myself to refer to them, and it will gratify my reader to find them entered here:- Ultima Cumaei venit jam carminis aetas: Magnus ab integro saeclorum nascitur ordo.] Talia saecla suis dixerunt, currite, fusis Concordes stabili fatorum numine Parcae.] Aspice convexo nutantem pondere mundum, Terrasque, tractusque maris, coelumque profundum: Aspice, venturo laetentur ut omnia saeclo! The last great age, foretold by sacred rhymes, Renews its finish'd course; Saturnian times Roll round again; and mighty years, begun From their first orb, in radiant circles run.

    Majestic months, with swift but steady pace, Set out with him on their appointed race.] The Fates, when they their happy web have spun, Shall bless the clew, and bid it smoothly run.] See labouring nature calls thee to sustain The nodding frame of heaven and earth and main; See, to their base restored, earth, seas, and air, And joyful ages from behind appear In crowding ranks. DRYDEN.

    Hasten the time, thou God of ages! Even so. Amen. Come, Lord Jesus!


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 11. For the grace of God that bringeth salvation , etc.] By which is meant, not the free love and favour of God, which lies in his own heart; for though that is productive of salvation, and is the source and spring of it, and what brings it forth, and is far from encouraging licentiousness, but instructs in real piety, and constrains to obedience to the will of God; yet this does not appear, nor has it been, nor is it made manifest unto all men, but is peculiar to the Lord's own people; nor does it design the grace of God wrought in the hearts of believers; for though salvation is strictly connected with it, and it powerfully influences the lives and conversations of such, who are partakers of it; yet it has not appeared to, nor in all men; all men have not faith, nor hope, nor love, nor any other graces of the Spirit: but by the grace of God is intended the doctrine of grace, the Gospel of the grace of God; called so, because it is a declaration of the grace of God, and of salvation by it: and is the means, in the hand of the Spirit, of conveying grace to the heart, and implanting it in it; in which sense the phrase is used in ( Acts 20:24 2 Corinthians 6:1 Hebrews 12:15) and this is called the Gospel of salvation, the word of salvation, and salvation itself, and so may be said to bring it; it brings and publishes the good news of it; it shows unto men the way of salvation; it gives an account of the Saviour himself, that he is the great God, and so fit to be a Saviour; that he was appointed by God the Father to be his salvation; that he was sent, and came to work out salvation; and that he is become the author of it; and that he is the only Saviour, and an able, willing, and complete one: it gives an account of the salvation itself; that it is the salvation of the soul; that it is a great one, and includes both grace and glory; that it is everlasting, and all of free grace; and it points out the persons who are interested in it, and shall enjoy it, even all those that are chosen to it, and are redeemed, reconciled, and justified by the blood of Christ, and are brought to believe in him: and the Gospel not only brings the news of all this to the ear, in the external ministration of it; but it brings it to the heart, and is the power of God unto salvation, when it comes, not in word only, but in power, and in the Holy Ghost; or when it comes under the powerful influences and application of the Spirit of God. Some read this clause thus, that bringeth salvation to all men; to which agrees the Syriac version, which renders it, lk tyjm , that quickeneth or saveth all; and so the Arabic version: but then this cannot be understood of every individual person; for the Gospel has not brought salvation to everyone in any sense, not even in the external ministry of it; there have been multitudes who have never so much as heard the outward sound of salvation by Jesus Christ, and fewer still who have an application of it to their souls by the Spirit of God; to many to whom it has come, it has been an hidden Gospel, and the savour of death unto death: it follows indeed, hath appeared to all men ; which supposes it to have been hid, as it was, in the thoughts, purposes, and counsels of God; and in Jesus Christ, in whom all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge are hid; and in the covenant of grace, of which the Gospel is a transcript; and in the types and shadows of the ceremonial law: it was in some measure hid from angels, who desire to look into it, and from the Old Testament saints, to whom it was not known as it is now, by the apostles and prophets; and it was entirely hid from the Gentiles, the times of whose ignorance God overlooked: and it suggests, that it now appeared or shone out more clearly, and more largely. The Gospel had been like a candle lighted up in one part of the world, only in Judea, but now it shone out like the sun in its meridian glory, and appeared to all men; not to every individual person; it has neither shined upon, nor in everyone: it did not in the apostle's time, when it appeared the most illustrious, and shone out the most extensively, as well as the most clearly; nor has it in ages since, nor does it in ours; there are multitudes who know nothing of it, and are neither under its form nor power: but this is to be understood of all sorts of men, of every nation, of every age and sex, of every state and condition, high and low, rich and poor, bond and free, masters and servants; which sense well agrees with the context, ( Titus 2:2-4,6,9,10) and the words are a reason why the apostle would have duty urged on all sorts of persons, because the Gospel was now preached to all; and it had reached the hearts of all sorts of men; particularly the Gentiles may be intended from whom the Gospel was before hid, and who sat in darkness, and in the shadow of death; but now the great light shined upon them, and the Gospel was no more confined to one people only, but was preached to every creature under heaven, or to the whole creation; namely, to the Gentiles, pursuant to the commission in ( Mark 16:15).

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 11-15 - The
    doctrine of grace and salvation by the gospel, is for all ranks an conditions of men. It teaches to forsake sin; to have no more to d with it. An earthly, sensual conversation suits not a heavenly calling It teaches to make conscience of that which is good. We must look to God in Christ, as the object of our hope and worship. A gospe conversation must be a godly conversation. See our duty in a very fe words; denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, living soberly righteously, and godly, notwithstanding all snares, temptations corrupt examples, ill usage, and what remains of sin in the believer' heart, with all their hinderances. It teaches to look for the glorie of another world. At, and in, the glorious appearing of Christ, the blessed hope of Christians will be complete: To bring us to holines and happiness was the end of Christ's death. Jesus Christ, that grea God and our Saviour, who saves not only as God, much less as Man alone but as God-man, two natures in one person. He loved us, and gav himself for us; and what can we do less than love and give up ourselve to him! Redemption from sin and sanctification of the nature go together, and make a peculiar people unto God, free from guilt an condemnation, and purified by the Holy Spirit. All Scripture i profitable. Here is what will furnish for all parts of duty, and the right discharge of them. Let us inquire whether our whole dependence i placed upon that grace which saves the lost, pardons the guilty, an sanctifies the unclean. And the further we are removed from boasting of fancied good works, or trusting in them, so that we glory in Chris alone, the more zealous shall we be to abound in real good works __________________________________________________________________


    Greek Textus Receptus


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    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    11. This
    teaching or doctrine which is to be adorned by the lives of God's servants - the teaching of the gospel - is now stated in vv. 11-15. The grace of God (h cariv tou qeou). A common Pauline phrase. The exact phrase only here in Pastorals. It is the ultimate ground of salvation. Comp. 2 Tim. i. 9; Eph. ii. 5, 8; Gal. i. 15.

    That bringeth salvation (swthriov). Lit. saving. N.T.o . Const. with cariv grace. The saving grace of God.

    Hath appeared (epefanh). Only in Pastorals, Luke, and Acts. In the active voice, to bring to light, show. See on ejpifaneia appearing, 1 Timothy vi. 14.

    To all men. Const. with that bringeth salvation, not with hath appeared. The grace of God which is saving for all men. Comp. 1 Tim. ii. 4.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    2:11 {Hath appeared} (epefane). "Did appear," the first Epiphany (the Incarnation). Second aorist passive indicative of epifainw, old verb, in N.T. here, #3:4; Lu 1:79; Ac 27:20. {Bringing salvation} (swterios). Old adjective from swter (Savior), here alone in N.T. except to s"trion (salvation, "the saving act") in #Lu 2:30; 3:6; Eph 6:17. {Instructing} (paideuousa). See #1Ti 1:20. {Ungodliness} (asebeian). See #Ro 1:18. {Worldly lusts} (tas kosmikas epithumias). Aristotle and Plutarch use kosmikos (from kosmos) about the universe as in #Heb 9:1 about the earthly. Here it has alone in N.T. the sense of evil "in this present age" as with kosmos in #1Jo 2:16. The three adverbs set off the opposite (soberly s"phron"s, righteously dikai"s, godly euseb"s).


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

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