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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Ecclesiastes 8:11


    CHAPTERS: Ecclesiastes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB - COMM


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB

    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Ecclesiastes 8:11

    οτι 3754 ουκ 3756 εστιν 2076 5748 γινομενη 1096 5740 αντιρρησις απο 575 των 3588 ποιουντων το 3588 πονηρον 4190 ταχυ 5035 δια 1223 2203 τουτο 5124 επληροφορηθη καρδια 2588 υιων 5207 του 3588 ανθρωπου 444 εν 1722 1520 αυτοις 846 του 3588 ποιησαι 4160 5658 το 3588 πονηρον 4190

    Douay Rheims Bible

    For because sentence is not speedily pronounced against the evil, the children of
    men commit evils without any fear.

    King James Bible - Ecclesiastes 8:11

    Because sentence against an evil
    work is not executed speedily, therefore the heart of the sons of men is fully set in them to do evil.

    World English Bible

    Because sentence against an evil
    work is not executed speedily, therefore the heart of the sons of men is fully set in them to do evil.

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Ecclesiastes 8:11

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xiv Pg 35.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 11
    In Isa. viii. 8; 10, compared with vii. 14 in the Eng. ver. and the LXX., and also Lowth, introductory remarks on ch. viii.

    —in order that you may regard not the sound only of the name, but the sense too. For the Hebrew sound, which is Emmanuel, has an interpretation, which is, God with us. Inquire, then, whether this speech, “God with us” (which is Emmanuel), be commonly applied to Christ ever since Christ’s light has dawned, and I think you will not deny it. For they who out of Judaism believe in Christ, ever since their believing on Him, do, whenever they shall wish to say1257

    1257 Or, “to call him.”

    Emmanuel, signify that God is with us:  and thus it is agreed that He who was ever predicted as Emmanuel is already come, because that which Emmanuel signifies is come—that is, “God with us.” Equally are they led by the sound of the name when they so understand “the power of Damascus,” and “the spoils of Samaria,” and “the kingdom of the Assyrians,” as if they portended Christ as a warrior; not observing that Scripture premises, “since, ere the child learn to call father or mother, he shall receive the power of Damascus and the spoils of Samaria, in opposition to the king of the Assyrians.” For the first step is to look at the demonstration of His age, to see whether the age there indicated can possibly exhibit the Christ as already a man, not to say a general. Forsooth, by His babyish cry the infant would summon men to arms, and would give the signal of war not with clarion, but with rattle, and point out the foe, not from His charger’s back or from a rampart, but from the back or neck of His suckler and nurse, and thus subdue Damascus and Samaria in place of the breast. (It is another matter if, among you, infants rush out into battle,—oiled first, I suppose, to dry in the sun, and then armed with satchels and rationed on butter,—who are to know how to lance sooner than how to lacerate the bosom!)1258

    1258 See adv. Marc. l. iii. c. xiii., which, with the preceding chapter, should be compared throughout with the chapter before us.

    Certainly, if nature nowhere allows this,—(namely,) to serve as a soldier before developing into manhood, to take “the power of Damascus” before knowing your father,—it follows that the pronouncement is visibly figurative.  “But again,” say they, “nature suffers not a ‘virgin’ to be a parent; and yet the prophet must be believed.”  And deservedly so; for he bespoke credit for a thing incredible, by saying that it was to be a sign. “Therefore,” he says, “shall a sign be given you. Behold, a virgin shall conceive in womb, and bear a son.” But a sign from God, unless it had consisted in some portentous novelty, would not have appeared a sign. In a word, if, when you are anxious to cast any down from (a belief in) this divine prediction, or to convert whoever are simple, you have the audacity to lie, as if the Scripture contained (the announcement), that not “a virgin,” but “a young female,” was to conceive and bring forth; you are refuted even by this fact, that a daily occurrence—the pregnancy and parturition of a young female, namely—cannot possibly seem anything of a sign. And the setting before us, then, of a virgin-mother is deservedly believed to be a sign; but not equally so a warrior-infant.  For there would not in this case again be involved the question of a sign; but, the sign of a novel birth having been awarded, the next step after the sign is, that there is enunciated a different ensuing ordering1259

    1259


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.iii Pg 7.3


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 44
    Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11" id="v.iv.vi.vi-p44.1" parsed="|1Cor|3|19|3|20;|Job|5|13|0|0;|Ps|94|11|0|0" osisRef="Bible:1Cor.3.19-1Cor.3.20 Bible:Job.5.13 Bible:Ps.94.11">1 Cor. iii. 19, 20; Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11.

    For in general we may conclude for certain that he could not possibly have cited the authority of that God whom he was bound to destroy, since he would not teach for Him.5467

    5467 Si non illi doceret.

    “Therefore,” says he, “let no man glory in man;”5468

    5468


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xiii Pg 4
    Isa. lxvi. 2.


    Anf-01 v.iv.vii Pg 9
    Isa. lxvi. 2.

    And do ye also reverence your bishop as Christ Himself, according as the blessed apostles have enjoined you. He that is within the altar is pure, wherefore also he is obedient to the bishop and presbyters: but he that is without is one that does anything apart from the bishop, the presbyters, and the deacons. Such a person is defiled in his conscience, and is worse than an infidel. <index subject1="Bishop" subject2="duties of" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p9.2"/>For what is the bishop but one who beyond all others possesses all power and authority, so far as it is possible for a man to possess it, who according to his ability has been made an imitator of the Christ of God?773

    773 Some render, “being a resemblance according to the power of Christ.”

    <index subject1="Presbytery" subject2="its function" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p10.1"/>And what is the presbytery but a sacred assembly, the counsellors and assessors of the bishop? <index subject1="Deacons" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p10.2"/><index subject1="James the Just" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p10.3"/>And what are the deacons but imitators of the angelic powers,774

    774 Some read, “imitators of Christ, ministering to the bishop, as Christ to the Father.”

    fulfilling a pure and blameless ministry unto him, as the holy Stephen did to the blessed James, Timothy and Linus to Paul, Anencletus and Clement to Peter? He, therefore, that will not yield obedience to such, must needs be one utterly without God, an impious man who despises Christ, and depreciates His appointments.


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xix Pg 6
    Isa. lxvi. 2. All the preceding clauses are given in Cod. Sin. in distinct lines.

    Thou shalt not be mindful of evil against thy brother. Thou shalt not be of doubtful mind1692

    1692


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 33.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xxvii Pg 20.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 12
    Deut. xiii. 1.

    But also in another section,8238

    8238 Of course our division of the Scripture by chapter and verse did not exist in the days of Tertullian.—Tr.

    “If, however, thy brother, the son of thy father or of thy mother, or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend who is as thine own soul, solicit thee, saying secretly, Let us go and serve other gods, which thou knowest not, nor did thy fathers, of the gods of the nations which are round about thee, very nigh unto thee or far off from thee, do not consent to go with him, and do not hearken to him. Thine eye shall not spare him, neither shalt thou pity, neither shalt thou preserve him; thou shalt certainly inform upon him.  Thine hand shall be first upon him to kill him, and afterwards the hand of thy people; and ye shall stone him, and he shall die, seeing he has sought to turn thee away from the Lord thy God.”8239

    8239


    Anf-01 v.vi.iii Pg 8
    Deut. xiii. 6; 18.

    You ought therefore to “hate those that hate God, and to waste away [with grief] on account of His enemies.”899

    899


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 51
    Isa. iii. 12.

    In another passage He forbids all implicit trust in man, and likewise in the applause of man; as by the prophet Jeremiah: “Cursed be the man that trusteth in man.”4031

    4031


    Anf-02 v.ii.xiii Pg 6.2


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 15
    See Mal. i. as above.

    But of the spiritual sacrifices He adds, saying, “And in every place they offer clean sacrifices to my Name, saith the Lord.”1210

    1210


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 16
    See Mal. i. as above.



    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 52.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 227.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 41.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 19.1


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iv Pg 7


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxx Pg 9
    Ex. xx. 5; Isa. xlv. 5, 6.

    Such are the falsehoods which these people invent.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.viii Pg 37.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 20.1


    Npnf-201 iii.xii.xi Pg 25


    Anf-01 ii.ii.iv Pg 7
    Num. xvi. 33.

    Through envy, David underwent the hatred not only of foreigners, but was also persecuted by Saul king of Israel.24

    24


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxvii Pg 14
    Num. xvi. 33.

    <index subject1="Separatists to be shunned" title="497" id="ix.vi.xxvii-p14.2"/>But those who cleave asunder, and separate the unity of the Church, [shall] receive from God the same punishment as Jeroboam did.4161

    4161


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xiii Pg 4
    Ps. cix. 8.

    —thus leading to the completion of the apostles, according to the words spoken by David. Again, when the Holy Ghost had descended upon the disciples, that they all might prophesy and speak with tongues, and some mocked them, as if drunken with new wine, Peter said that they were not drunken, for it was the third hour of the day; but that this was what had been spoken by the prophet: “It shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh, and they shall prophesy.”3469

    3469


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxi Pg 4
    Acts i. 20, from Ps. cix. 8.

    They ought therefore to maintain that the twelfth Æon was cast out of the Pleroma, and that another was produced, or sent forth to fill her place; if, that is to say, she is pointed at in Judas. Moreover, they tell us that it was the Æon herself who suffered, but Judas was the betrayer, [and not the sufferer.] Even they themselves acknowledge that it was the suffering Christ, and not Judas, who came to [the endurance of] passion. How, then, could Judas, the betrayer of Him who had to suffer for our salvation, be the type and image of that Æon who suffered?


    Anf-03 v.iii.xx Pg 5
    Ps. cix. 8; comp. with Acts i. 15–20.

    chosen Matthias by lot as the twelfth, into the place of Judas, they obtained the promised power of the Holy Ghost for the gift of miracles and of utterance; and after first bearing witness to the faith in Jesus Christ throughout Judæa, and founding churches (there), they next went forth into the world and preached the same doctrine of the same faith to the nations. They then in like manner founded churches in every city, from which all the other churches, one after another, derived the tradition of the faith,2054

    2054 Traducem fidei.

    and the seeds of doctrine, and are every day deriving them,2055

    2055 Mutuantur “borrowing.”

    that they may become churches. Indeed, it is on this account only that they will be able to deem themselves apostolic, as being the offspring of apostolic churches.  Every sort of thing2056

    2056 Omne genus.

    must necessarily revert to its original for its classification.2057

    2057 Censeatur or, “for its origin.”

    Therefore the churches, although they are so many and so great, comprise but the one primitive church, (founded) by the apostles, from which they all (spring).  In this way all are primitive, and all are apostolic, whilst they are all proved to be one, in (unbroken) unity, by their peaceful communion,2058

    2058 Communicatio pacis.

    and title of brotherhood, and bond2059

    2059


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 12
    Deut. xiii. 1.

    But also in another section,8238

    8238 Of course our division of the Scripture by chapter and verse did not exist in the days of Tertullian.—Tr.

    “If, however, thy brother, the son of thy father or of thy mother, or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend who is as thine own soul, solicit thee, saying secretly, Let us go and serve other gods, which thou knowest not, nor did thy fathers, of the gods of the nations which are round about thee, very nigh unto thee or far off from thee, do not consent to go with him, and do not hearken to him. Thine eye shall not spare him, neither shalt thou pity, neither shalt thou preserve him; thou shalt certainly inform upon him.  Thine hand shall be first upon him to kill him, and afterwards the hand of thy people; and ye shall stone him, and he shall die, seeing he has sought to turn thee away from the Lord thy God.”8239

    8239


    Anf-01 v.vi.iii Pg 8
    Deut. xiii. 6; 18.

    You ought therefore to “hate those that hate God, and to waste away [with grief] on account of His enemies.”899

    899


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 51
    Isa. iii. 12.

    In another passage He forbids all implicit trust in man, and likewise in the applause of man; as by the prophet Jeremiah: “Cursed be the man that trusteth in man.”4031

    4031


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xx Pg 15
    Ps. lxix. 21.

    that He was despised among the people, and humbled Himself even to death and that He is the holy Lord, the Wonderful, the Counsellor, the Beautiful in appearance, and the Mighty God,3678

    3678


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 78
    Ps. lxix. 21.

    and that He should be forsaken by His friends and those nearest to Him;4318

    4318


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 10
    Ps. lxix. 21 (lxviii. 5 in LXX.).

    “Upon my vesture they did cast (the) lot;”1321

    1321


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 18
    Ps. xxii. 16, 17 (xxi. 17, 18, in LXX.); and lxix. 21 (lxviii. 22 in LXX.).

    These things David did not suffer, so as to seem justly to have spoken of himself; but the Christ who was crucified.  Moreover, the “hands and feet,” are not “exterminated,”1397

    1397 i.e., displaced, dislocated.

    except His who is suspended on a “tree.”  Whence, again, David said that “the Lord would reign from the tree:”1398

    1398 See c. x. above.

    for elsewhere, too, the prophet predicts the fruit of this “tree,” saying “The earth hath given her blessings,”1399

    1399


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    ecf25Oz2z14; 31,32


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxiv Pg 17
    Jer. xviii. 11.

    meaning not to sinful evils, but avenging ones.  What sort of stigma3003

    3003 Infamiam.

    pertains to these, congruous as they are with God’s judicial character, we have sufficiently explained.3004

    3004 See above, chap. xiv. [p. 308, supra.]

    Now although these are called “evils,” they are yet not reprehensible in a judge; nor because of this their name do they show that the judge is evil: so in like manner will this particular evil3005

    3005


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxii Pg 4
    Jer. xi. 19.

    <index subject1="Scriptures" title="234" id="viii.iv.lxxii-p4.2"/>And since this passage from the sayings of Jeremiah is still written in some copies [of the Scriptures] in the synagogues of the Jews (for it is only a short time since they were cut out), and since from these words it is demonstrated that the Jews deliberated about the Christ Himself, to crucify and put Him to death, He Himself is both declared to be led as a sheep to the slaughter, as was predicted by Isaiah, and is here represented as a harmless lamb; but being in a difficulty about them, they give themselves over to blasphemy. And again, from the sayings of the same Jeremiah these have been cut out: ‘The Lord God remembered His dead people of Israel who lay in the graves; and He descended to preach to them His own salvation.’2221

    2221 This is wanting in our Scriptures: it is cited by Iren., iii. 20, under the name of Isaiah, and in iv. 22 under that of Jeremiah.—Maranus.



    Anf-01 v.xv.iii Pg 6
    Isa. liii. 7; Jer. xi. 19.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 45
    See Jer. xi. 19 (in LXX.).

    Of course on His body that “wood” was put;1349

    1349


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xix Pg 7
    Jer. xi. 19.

    that is, His body. For so did God in your own gospel even reveal the sense, when He called His body bread; so that, for the time to come, you may understand that He has given to His body the figure of bread, whose body the prophet of old figuratively turned into bread, the Lord Himself designing to give by and by an interpretation of the mystery. If you require still further prediction of the Lord’s cross, the twenty-first Psalm3361

    3361 The twenty-second Psalm. A.V.

    is sufficiently able to afford it to you, containing as it does the entire passion of Christ, who was even then prophetically declaring3362

    3362 Canentis.

    His glory. “They pierced,” says He, “my hands and my feet,”3363

    3363


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xl Pg 21
    So the Septuagint in Jer. xi. 19, Ξύλον εἰς τὸν ἄρτον αὐτοῦ (A.V. “Let us destroy the tree with the fruit”). See above, book iii. chap. xix. p. 337.

    which means, of course, the cross upon His body. And thus, casting light, as He always did, upon the ancient prophecies,5089

    5089 Illuminator antiquitatum. This general phrase includes typical ordinances under the law, as well as the sayings of the prophets.

    He declared plainly enough what He meant by the bread, when He called the bread His own body. He likewise, when mentioning the cup and making the new testament to be sealed “in His blood,”5090

    5090


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 41.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 42
    Vel: or, “if you please;” indicating some uncertainty in the quotation. The passage is more like Jer. xv. 14 than anything in Isaiah (see, however, Isa. xxx. 27; 30).

    by Isaiah, “A fire has been kindled in mine anger.” He cannot lie. If it is not He who uttered His voice out of even the burning bush, it can be of no importance4691

    4691 Viderit.

    what fire you insist upon being understood.  Even if it be but figurative fire, yet, from the very fact that he takes from my element illustrations for His own sense, He is mine, because He uses what is mine. The similitude of fire must belong to Him who owns the reality thereof. But He will Himself best explain the quality of that fire which He mentioned, when He goes on to say, “Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, Nay; but rather division.”4692

    4692


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xvi Pg 48.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 41.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 42
    Vel: or, “if you please;” indicating some uncertainty in the quotation. The passage is more like Jer. xv. 14 than anything in Isaiah (see, however, Isa. xxx. 27; 30).

    by Isaiah, “A fire has been kindled in mine anger.” He cannot lie. If it is not He who uttered His voice out of even the burning bush, it can be of no importance4691

    4691 Viderit.

    what fire you insist upon being understood.  Even if it be but figurative fire, yet, from the very fact that he takes from my element illustrations for His own sense, He is mine, because He uses what is mine. The similitude of fire must belong to Him who owns the reality thereof. But He will Himself best explain the quality of that fire which He mentioned, when He goes on to say, “Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, Nay; but rather division.”4692

    4692


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxii Pg 2
    Amos v. 18 to end, Amos vi. 1–7.

    And again by Jeremiah: ‘Collect your flesh, and sacrifices, and eat: for concerning neither sacrifices nor libations did I command your fathers in the day in which I took them by the hand to lead them out of Egypt.’2002

    2002


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxii Pg 2
    Amos v. 18 to end, Amos vi. 1–7.

    And again by Jeremiah: ‘Collect your flesh, and sacrifices, and eat: for concerning neither sacrifices nor libations did I command your fathers in the day in which I took them by the hand to lead them out of Egypt.’2002

    2002


    Anf-01 ix.vi.viii Pg 16
    Ex. iii. 7, 8.

    For the Son, who is the Word of God, arranged these things beforehand from the beginning, the Father being in no want of angels, in order that He might call the creation into being, and form man, for whom also the creation was made; nor, again, standing in need of any instrumentality for the framing of created things, or for the ordering of those things which had reference to man; while, [at the same time,] He has a vast and unspeakable number of servants. For His offspring and His similitude3879

    3879 Massuet here observes, that the fathers called the Holy Spirit the similitude of the Son.

    do minister to Him in every respect; that is, the Son and the Holy Spirit, the Word and Wisdom; whom all the angels serve, and to whom they are subject. Vain, therefore, are those who, because of that declaration, “No man knoweth the Father, but the Son,”3880

    3880


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xiii Pg 13
    Ex. iii. 7, 8.

    it being customary from the beginning with the Word of God to ascend and descend for the purpose of saving those who were in affliction.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxxvii Pg 2
    Zech. ii. 8.

    to God, is as one that touches the apple of God’s eye, how much more so is he that touches His beloved! And that this is He, has been sufficiently demonstrated.”


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxv Pg 4
    Zech. ii. 8.

    Such identity of care proceeds from one and the same Being. A trespassing brother He will have rebuked.4862

    4862


    Anf-01 vi.ii.ix Pg 8
    Isa. i. 2.

    These are in proof.1555

    1555 In proof of the spiritual meaning of circumcision; but Hilgenfeld joins the words to the preceding sentence.

    And again He saith, “Hear the word of the Lord, ye rulers of this people.”1556


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 2.

    And again: “Thus saith the Lord God, who made the heaven, and stretched it out; who established the earth, and the things in it; and who giveth breath to the people upon it, and spirit to them who walk therein.”3811

    3811


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xlii Pg 5
    Isa. i. 2.

    And again, where He says that these children are aliens: “Strange children have lied unto Me.”4439

    4439


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 53.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 15.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 8
    Again an error; for these words precede the others. These are found in Isa. i. 2.

    and again, “And if ye shall have outstretched hands, I will avert my face from you; and if ye shall have multiplied prayers, I will not hear you: for your hands are full of blood;”1168

    1168


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 23
    Comp. Isa. i. 2 as above, and Acts xiii. 17.

    in Egypt, and was transported through the Red Sea, and who in the desert, fed forty years with manna, was wrought to the semblance of eternity, and not contaminated with human passions,1183

    1183 Sæculi.

    or fed on this world’s1184

    1184


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 25
    Isa. i. 2, as before.

    So, too, Egypt is sometimes understood to mean the whole world1271

    1271 Orbis.

    in that prophet, on the count of superstition and malediction.1272

    1272


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiii Pg 31
    Isa. i. 2.

    So likewise by Egypt is sometimes understood, in His sense,3284

    3284 Apud illum, i.e., Creatorem.

    the whole world as being marked out by superstition and a curse.3285

    3285 Maledictionis.

    By a similar usage Babylon also in our (St.) John is a figure of the city of Rome, as being like (Babylon) great and proud in royal power, and warring down the saints of God. Now it was in accordance with this style that He called the magi by the name of Samaritans, because (as we have said) they had practised idolatry as did the Samaritans.  Moreover, by the phrase “before or against the king of Assyria,” understand “against Herod;” against whom the magi then opposed themselves, when they refrained from carrying him back word concerning Christ, whom he was seeking to destroy.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiv Pg 41
    Isa. i. 2.

    Now, for my own part indeed, even though Scripture held out no hand of heavenly hope to me (as, in fact, it so often does), I should still possess a sufficient presumption3474

    3474 Præjudicium.

    of even this promise, in my present enjoyment of the earthly gift; and I should look out for something also of the heavenly, from Him who is the God of heaven as well as of earth. I should thus believe that the Christ who promises the higher blessings is (the Son) of Him who had also promised the lower ones; who had, moreover, afforded proofs of greater gifts by smaller ones; who had reserved for His Christ alone this revelation3475

    3475 Præconium.

    of a (perhaps3476

    3476 Si forte.

    ) unheard of kingdom, so that, while the earthly glory was announced by His servants, the heavenly might have God Himself for its messenger. You, however, argue for another Christ, from the very circumstance that He proclaims a new kingdom. You ought first to bring forward some example of His beneficence,3477

    3477 Indulgentiæ.

    that I may have no good reason for doubting the credibility of the great promise, which you say ought to be hoped for; nay, it is before all things necessary that you should prove that a heaven belongs to Him, whom you declare to be a promiser of heavenly things. As it is, you invite us to dinner, but do not point out your house; you assert a kingdom, but show us no royal state.3478

    3478 Regiam: perhaps “capital” or “palace.”

    Can it be that your Christ promises a kingdom of heaven, without having a heaven; as He displayed Himself man, without having flesh? O what a phantom from first to last!3479

    3479 Omne.

    O hollow pretence of a mighty promise!


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.ix Pg 30
    Isa. i. 2.

    yet He added not “from the womb.” Now, why should He have added so superfluously this phrase “from the womb” (as if there could be any doubt about any one’s having been born from the womb), unless the Holy Ghost had wished the words to be with especial care5609

    5609 Curiosius.

    understood of Christ? “I have begotten Thee from the womb,” that is to say, from a womb only, without a man’s seed, making it a condition of a fleshly body5610

    5610 Deputans carni: a note against Docetism.

    that it should come out of a womb. What is here added (in the Psalm), “Thou art a priest for ever,”5611

    5611


    Anf-03 vi.iv.ii Pg 5
    Isa. i. 2.

    Moreover, in saying “Father,” we also call Him “God.” That appellation is one both of filial duty and of power. Again, in the Father the Son is invoked; “for I,” saith He, “and the Father are One.”8771

    8771


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.vi Pg 14
    Isa. i. 2, 3.

    We indeed, who know for certain that Christ always spoke in the prophets, as the Spirit of the Creator (for so says the prophet: “The person of our Spirit, Christ the Lord,”3169

    3169 This seems to be a translation with a slight alteration of the LXX. version of Lam. iv. 20, πνεῦμα προσώπου ἡμῶν Χριστὸς Κύριος .

    who from the beginning was both heard and seen as the Father’s vicegerent in the name of God), are well aware that His words, when actually upbraiding Israel, were the same as those which it was foretold that He should denounce against him: “Ye have forsaken the Lord, and have provoked the Holy One of Israel to anger.”3170

    3170


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 36
    Isa. lvii. i.

    When does this more frequently happen than in the persecution of His saints? This, indeed, is no ordinary matter,4291

    4291 We have, by understanding res, treated these adjectives as nouns. Rigalt. applies them to the doctrina of the sentence just previous. Perhaps, however, “persecutione” is the noun.

    no common casualty of the law of nature; but it is that illustrious devotion, that fighting for the faith, wherein whosoever loses his life for God saves it, so that you may here again recognize the Judge who recompenses the evil gain of life with its destruction, and the good loss thereof with its salvation. It is, however, a jealous God whom He here presents to me; one who returns evil for evil.  “For whosoever,” says He, “shall be ashamed of me, of him will I also be ashamed.”4292

    4292


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 71.1


    Anf-03 vi.iii.ix Pg 8
    See Ex. xv. 24, 25.

    of Moses. That tree was Christ,8623

    8623 “The Tree of Life,” “the True Vine,” etc.

    restoring, to wit, of Himself, the veins of sometime envenomed and bitter nature into the all-salutary waters of baptism. This is the water which flowed continuously down for the people from the “accompanying rock;” for if Christ is “the Rock,” without doubt we see baptism blest by the water in Christ. How mighty is the grace of water, in the sight of God and His Christ, for the confirmation of baptism!  Never is Christ without water: if, that is, He is Himself baptized in water;8624

    8624


    Anf-01 v.iii.iii Pg 16
    Ex. xvi. 8.

    No one of those has, [in fact,] remained unpunished, who rose up against their superiors. For Dathan and Abiram did not speak against the law, but against Moses,657

    657


    Anf-03 iv.iv.iii Pg 8
    See Ex. xxxii.; and compare 1 Cor. x. 7, where the latter part of Ex. xxxii. 6 is quoted.



    Anf-03 v.x.iii Pg 3
    Ex. xxxii.

    Aaron is importuned, and commands that the earrings of their women be brought together, that they may be thrown into the fire. For the people were about to lose, as a judgment upon themselves, the true ornaments for the ears, the words of God. The wise fire makes for them the molten likeness of a calf, reproaching them with having the heart where they have their treasure also,—in Egypt, to wit, which clothed with sacredness, among the other animals, a certain ox likewise.  Therefore the slaughter of three thousand by their nearest relatives, because they had displeased their so very near relative God, solemnly marked both the commencement and the deserts of the trespass. Israel having, as we are told in Numbers,8247

    8247


    Anf-01 ii.ii.li Pg 4
    Num. xvi.

    Pharaoh with his army and all the princes of Egypt, and the chariots with their riders, were sunk in the depths of the Red Sea, and perished,231

    231


    Anf-01 v.iii.iii Pg 17
    Num. xvi. 1.

    and were cast down alive into Hades. Korah also,658

    658


    Anf-01 ii.ii.iii Pg 3
    Deut. xxxii. 15.

    Hence flowed emulation and envy, strife and sedition, persecution and disorder, war and captivity. So the worthless rose up against the honoured, those of no reputation against such as were renowned, the foolish against the wise, the young against those advanced in years. <index subject1="Envy" subject2="its effect on Corinthian Church" title="6" id="ii.ii.iii-p3.2"/><index subject1="Strife, its effects" title="6" id="ii.ii.iii-p3.3"/>For this reason righteousness and peace are now far departed from you, inasmuch as every one abandons the fear of God, and is become blind in His faith,15

    15 It seems necessary to refer


    Anf-01 v.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Deut. xxxii. 15.

    and “become gross,” sets at nought His doctrine, shall go into hell. <index subject1="Falsehood" title="56" id="v.ii.xvi-p7.2"/>In like manner, every one that has received from God the power of distinguishing, and yet follows an unskilful shepherd, and receives a false opinion for the truth, shall be punished. <index subject1="Idols, vanity of" title="56" id="v.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>“What communion hath light with darkness? or Christ with Belial? Or what portion hath he that believeth with an infidel? or the temple of God with idols?”601

    601


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xx Pg 3
    Deut. xxxii. 15.

    For it was told you by Moses in the book of Genesis, that God granted to Noah, being a just man, to eat of every animal, but not of flesh with the blood, which is dead.”1996

    1996 νεκριμαῖον, or “dieth of itself;” com. reading was ἐκριμαῖον, which was supposed to be derived from ἐκρίπτω, and to mean “which ought to be cast out:” the above was suggested by H. Stephanus.

    And as he was ready to say, “as the green herbs,” I anticipated him: “Why do you not receive this statement, ‘as the green herbs,’ in the sense in which it was given by God, to wit, that just as God has granted the herbs for sustenance to man, even so has He given the animals for the diet of flesh? But, you say, a distinction was laid down thereafter to Noah, because we do not eat certain herbs. As you interpret it, the thing is incredible. And first I shall not occupy myself with this, though able to say and to hold that every vegetable is food, and fit to be eaten. But although we discriminate between green herbs, not eating all, we refrain from eating some, not because they are common or unclean, but because they are bitter, or deadly, or thorny. But we lay hands on and take of all herbs which are sweet, very nourishing and good, whether they are marine or land plants. Thus also God by the mouth of Moses commanded you to abstain from unclean and improper1997

    1997 ἄὸικος καὶ παράνομος.

    and violent animals: when, moreover, though you were eating manna in the desert, and were seeing all those wondrous acts wrought for you by God, you made and worshipped the golden calf.1998

    1998 “The reasoning of St. Justin is not quite clear to interpreters. As we abstain from some herbs, not because they are forbidden by law, but because they are deadly; so the law of abstinence from improper and violent animals was imposed not on Noah, but on you as a yoke on account of your sins.”—Maranus.

    Hence he cries continually, and justly, ‘They are foolish children, in whom is no faith.’1999

    1999


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 8

    VERSE 	(11) - 

    Ex 8:15,32 Job 21:11-15 Ps 10:6; 50:21,22 Isa 5:18,19; 26:10


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET