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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Hebrews 1:5


    CHAPTERS: Hebrews 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

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    King James Bible - Hebrew 1:5

    For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?

    World English Bible

    For to which of the angels did he say at any
    time, "You are my Son. Today have I become your father?" and again, "I will be to him a Father, and he will be to me a Son?"

    Douay-Rheims - Hebrew 1:5

    For to which of the angels hath he said at any
    time, Thou art my Son, to day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?

    Webster's Bible Translation

    For to which of the angels said he at any
    time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?

    Greek Textus Receptus


    τινι
    5101 γαρ 1063 ειπεν 2036 5627 ποτε 4218 των 3588 αγγελων 32 υιος 5207 μου 3450 ει 1488 5748 συ 4771 εγω 1473 σημερον 4594 γεγεννηκα 1080 5758 σε 4571 και 2532 παλιν 3825 εγω 1473 εσομαι 2071 5704 αυτω 846 εις 1519 πατερα 3962 και 2532 αυτος 846 εσται 2071 5704 μοι 3427 εις 1519 υιον 5207

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (5) -
    Heb 5:5 Ps 2:7 Ac 13:33

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 1:5

    Porque ¿A cul de los ngeles dijo Dios jams: Mi Hijo eres t, hoy yo te he engendrado, Y otra vez: Yo ser a l Padre, y l me ser a mí Hijo?

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Hebrew 1:5

    Verse 5. Thou
    art my Son, this day have I begotten thee] These words are quoted from Psa. ii. 7, a psalm that seems to refer only to the Messiah; and they are quoted by St. Paul, Acts xiii. 33, as referring to the resurrection of Christ. And this application of them is confirmed by the same apostle, Rom. i. 4, as by his resurrection from the dead he was declared - manifestly proved, to be the Son of God with power; God having put forth his miraculous energy in raising that body from the grave which had truly died, and died a violent death, for Christ was put to death as a malefactor, but by his resurrection his innocence was demonstrated, as God could not work a miracle to raise a wicked man from the dead. As Adam was created by God, and because no natural generation could have any operation in this case, therefore he was called the son of God, Luke iii. 38, and could never have seen corruption if he had not sinned, so the human nature of Jesus Christ, formed by the energy of the eternal Spirit in the womb of the virgin, without any human intervention, was for this very reason called the Son of God, Luke i. 35; and because it had not sinned, therefore it could not see corruption, nor was it even mortal, but through a miraculous display of God's infinite love, for the purpose of making a sacrificial atonement for the sin of the world and God, having raised this sacrificed human nature from the dead, declared that same Jesus (who was, as above stated, the Son of God) to be his Son, the promised Messiah; and as coming by the Virgin Mary, the right heir to the throne of David, according to the uniform declaration of all the prophets.

    The words, This day have I begotten thee, must refer either to his incarnation, when he was miraculously conceived in the womb of the virgin by the power of the Holy Spirit; or to his resurrection from the dead, when God, by this sovereign display of his almighty energy, declared him to be his Son, vindicated his innocence, and also the purity and innocence of the blessed virgin, who was the mother of this son, and who declared him to be produced in her womb by the power of God. The resurrection of Christ, therefore, to which the words most properly refer, not only gave the fullest proof that he was an innocent and righteous man, but also that he had accomplished the purpose for which he died, and that his conception was miraculous, and his mother a pure and unspotted virgin.

    This is a subject of infinite importance to the Christian system, and of the last consequence in reference to the conviction and conversion of the Jews, for whose use this epistle was sent by God. Here is the rock on which they split; they deny this Divine Sonship of Jesus Christ, and their blasphemies against him and his virgin mother are too shocking to be transcribed. The certainty of the resurrection of Jesus refutes their every calumny; proves his miraculous conception; vindicates the blessed virgin; and, in a word, declares him to be the Son of God with power.

    This most important use of this saying has passed unnoticed by almost every Christian writer which I have seen; and yet it lies here at the foundation of all the apostle's proofs. If Jesus was not thus the Son of God, the whole Christian system is vain and baseless: but his resurrection demonstrates him to have been the Son of God; therefore every thing built on this foundation is more durable than the foundations of heaven, and as inexpungable as the throne of the eternal King.

    He shall be to me a Son?] As the Jews have ever blasphemed against the Sonship of Christ, it was necessary that the apostle should adduce and make strong all his proofs, and show that this was not a new revelation; that it was that which was chiefly intended in several scriptures of the Old Testament, which, without farther mentioning the places where found, he immediately produces. This place, which is quoted from 2 Samuel vii. 14, shows us that the seed which God promised to David, and who was to sit upon his throne, and whose throne should be established for ever, was not Solomon, but Jesus Christ; and indeed he quotes the words so as to intimate that they were so understood by the Jews. See among the observations at the end of the chapter.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 5. For unto which of the angels said he at any time , etc..] That is, he never said to any of the angels what he has said to Christ; namely, what follows, thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee for though angels are called the sons of God, ( Job 1:6 2:1 38:7) yet are never said to be begotten by him; or, with this clause annexed to it, this day have I begotten thee; nor are they ever so called in a proper sense, or in such sense as Christ is: this is said to Christ, and of him, in ( Psalm 2:7) and that agreeably to the sense of the Jewish church at this time, or the apostle would never have produced it to the Hebrews in such a manner; and not only the whole psalm in general, but this verse in particular, is owned by Jewish writers f19 , both ancient and modern, to belong to the Messiah. Christ is the Son of God, not by Creation, nor by adoption, nor by office, but by nature; he is the true, proper, natural, and eternal Son of God; and as such is owned and declared by Jehovah the Father, in these words; the foundation of which relation lies in the begetting of him; which refers not to his nature, either divine or human: not to his divine nature, which is common with the Father and Spirit; wherefore if his was begotten, theirs must be also, being the same undivided nature, common to all three; much less to his human nature, in which he is never said to be begotten, but always to be made, and with respect to which he is without Father; nor to his office, as Mediator, in which he is not a Son, but a servant; besides, he was a Son, previous to his being a prophet, priest, and King; and his office is not the foundation of his sonship, but his sonship is the foundation of his office; or by which that is supported, and which fits him for the performance of it: but it has respect to his divine person; for as, in human generation, person begets person, and like begets like, so it is in divine generation; though care must be taken to remove all imperfection from it, as divisibility and multiplication of essence, priority and posteriority, dependence, and the like; nor can the modus, or manner of it, be conceived, or explained by us: the date of it, today, designs eternity, as in ( Isaiah 43:13), which is one continued day, an everlasting now; and this may be applied to any time and case, in which Christ is declared to be the Son of God; as at his incarnation, his baptism, his transfiguration on the Mount, and his resurrection from the dead, as in ( Acts 13:33 Romans 1:4) and at his ascension to heaven, when he was made Lord and Christ, and his divine sonship more manifestly appeared; which seems to be the time, and case, more especially referred to here. And again, I will be to him a father, and he shall be to me a Son: which words are taken from ( 2 Samuel 7:14) and the sense is, not that he should be his son by adoption; or that he would be instead of a father to him; or that he should be as dear to him as a son is to a father; but that he was really and properly so; and he would make it manifest, and own him as such, as he did at Jordan's river, upon the Mount, and at his resurrection and ascension; though the words are spoken of Solomon, as a type of Christ, they properly belong to the antitype, who is greater than Solomon.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 4-14 - Many
    Jews had a superstitious or idolatrous respect for angels, becaus they had received the law and other tidings of the Divine will by their ministry. They looked upon them as mediators between God and men, an some went so far as to pay them a kind of religious homage or worship Thus it was necessary that the apostle should insist, not only of Christ's being the Creator of all things, and therefore of angel themselves, but as being the risen and exalted Messiah in human nature to whom angels, authorities, and powers are made subject. To prove this, several passages are brought from the Old Testament. On comparin what God there says of the angels, with what he says to Christ, the inferiority of the angels to Christ plainly appears. Here is the offic of the angels; they are God's ministers or servants, to do his pleasure. But, how much greater things are said of Christ by the Father! And let us own and honour him as God; for if he had not bee God, he had never done the Mediator's work, and had never worn the Mediator's crown. It is declared how Christ was qualified for the office of Mediator, and how he was confirmed in it: he has the nam Messiah from his being anointed. Only as Man he has his fellows, and a anointed with the Holy Spirit; but he is above all prophets, priests and kings, that ever were employed in the service of God on earth Another passage of Scripture, Ps 102:25-27, is recited, in which the Almighty power of the Lord Jesus Christ is declared, both in creatin the world and in changing it. Christ will fold up this world as garment, not to be abused any longer, not to be used as it has been. A a sovereign, when his garments of state are folded and put away, is sovereign still, so our Lord, when he has laid aside the earth an heavens like a vesture, shall be still the same. Let us not then se our hearts upon that which is not what we take it to be, and will no be what it now is. Sin has made a great change in the world for the worse, and Christ will make a great change in it for the better. Le the thoughts of this make us watchful, diligent, and desirous of tha better world. The Saviour has done much to make all men his friends yet he has enemies. But they shall be made his footstool, by humbl submission, or by utter destruction. Christ shall go on conquering an to conquer. The most exalted angels are but ministering spirits, mer servants of Christ, to execute his commands. The saints, at present are heirs, not yet come into possession. The angels minister to them in opposing the malice and power of evil spirits, in protecting an keeping their bodies, instructing and comforting their souls, unde Christ and the Holy Ghost. Angels shall gather all the saints togethe at the last day, when all whose hearts and hopes are set upon perishin treasures and fading glories, will be driven from Christ's presenc into everlasting misery __________________________________________________________________


    Greek Textus Receptus


    τινι
    5101 γαρ 1063 ειπεν 2036 5627 ποτε 4218 των 3588 αγγελων 32 υιος 5207 μου 3450 ει 1488 5748 συ 4771 εγω 1473 σημερον 4594 γεγεννηκα 1080 5758 σε 4571 και 2532 παλιν 3825 εγω 1473 εσομαι 2071 5704 αυτω 846 εις 1519 πατερα 3962 και 2532 αυτος 846 εσται 2071 5704 μοι 3427 εις 1519 υιον 5207

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    5. The writer proceeds to establish the superiority of the Son to the
    angels by O.T. testimony. It is a mode of argument which does not appeal strongly to us. Dr. Bruce suggests that there are evidences that the writer himself developed it perfunctorily and without much interest in it. The seven following quotations are intended to show the surpassing excellence of Christ's name as set forth in Scripture. The quotations present difficulty in that they appear, in great part, to be used in a sense and with an application different from those which they originally had. All that can be said is, that the writer takes these passages as messianic, and applies them accordingly; and that we must distinguish between the doctrine and the method of argumentation peculiar to the time and people. Certain passages in Paul are open to the same objection, as Gal. iii. 16; iv. 22-25.

    To which (tini). Note the author's characteristic use of the question to express denial. Comp. ver. 14; ii. 3; iii. 17; vii. 11; xii. 7. First quotation from Psalm ii. 7. The Psalm is addressed as a congratulatory ode to a king of Judah, declaring his coming triumph over the surrounding nations, and calling on them to render homage to the God of Israel. The king is called Son of Jahveh, and is said to be "begotten" on the day on which he is publicly recognized as king. Words of the same Psalm are quoted Acts iv. 25, and these words Acts xiii. 33.

    Thou art my Son. Note the emphatic position of uiJov son. See on ver. 4. In the O.T. son is applied to angels collectively, but never individually. See Psalm xxix. 1; lxxxix. 6. Similarly, son is applied to the chosen nation, Exodus iv. 22; Hos. xi. 1, but to no individual of the nation.

    Have I begotten (gegennhka). Recognized thee publicly as sovereign; established thee in an official sonship-relation. This official installation appears to have its N.T. counterpart in the resurrection of Christ. In Acts xiii. 33, this is distinctly asserted; and in Rom. i. 4, Paul says that Christ was "powerfully declared" to be the Son of God by the resurrection from the dead. Comp. Col. i. 18; Apoc. i. 5. 168 Second quotation, 2 Sam. vii. 14. The reference is to Solomon. David proposes to build a temple. Nathan tells him that this shall be done by Solomon, whom Jahveh will adopt as his son. In 2 Cor. vi. 18, Paul applies the passage to followers of the Messiah, understanding the original as referring to all the spiritual children of David.

    A father - a son (eiv pateraeiv uion). Lit. for or as a father - son. This usage of eijv mostly in O.T. citations or established formulas. See Matt. xix. 5; Luke ii. 34; Acts xix. 27; 1 Cor. iv. 3.



    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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