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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 1:20


    CHAPTERS: Acts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     
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    King James Bible - Acts 1:20

    For it is written in the book of Psalms, Let his habitation be desolate, and let no man dwell therein: and his bishoprick let another take.

    World English Bible

    For it is written in the book of Psalms, 'Let his habitation be made desolate. Let no one dwell therein;' and, 'Let another take his
    office.'

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 1:20

    For it is written in the book of Psalms: Let their habitation become desolate, and let there be none to dwell therein. And his bishopric let another take.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    For it is written in the book of Psalms, Let his habitation be desolate, and let no man dwell in it: and, His bishopric let another take.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    γεγραπται
    1125 5769 V-RPI-3S γαρ 1063 CONJ εν 1722 PREP βιβλω 976 N-DSF ψαλμων 5568 N-GPM γενηθητω 1096 5676 V-AOM-3S η 3588 T-NSF επαυλις 1886 N-NSF αυτου 846 P-GSM ερημος 2048 A-NSF και 2532 CONJ μη 3361 PRT-N εστω 2077 5749 V-PXM-3S ο 3588 T-NSM κατοικων 2730 5723 V-PAP-NSM εν 1722 PREP αυτη 846 P-DSF και 2532 CONJ την 3588 T-ASF επισκοπην 1984 N-ASF αυτου 846 P-GSM λαβοι 2983 5630 V-2AAO-3S ετερος 2087 A-NSM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (20) -
    Ac 13:33 Lu 20:42; 24:44

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 1:20

    Porque est escrito en el libro de los Salmos: Sea hecha desierta su habitacin, y no haya quien more en ella; y: Tome otro su oficio.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 1:20

    Verse 20. For it is written in the book of Psalms] The places usually referred to are
    Psa. lxix. 25: Let their habitation be desolate, and let none dwell in their tents. And Psa. cix. 8: Let his days be few, and let another take his office, wtdqp pekudato, his overseership, his charge of visitation or superintendence, translated by the SEPTUAGINT, thn episkophn, VULGATE, episcopatum; and WE, following both, bishopric, but not with sufficient propriety, for surely the office or charge of Judas was widely different from what we call bishopric, the diocess, estate, and emoluments of a bishop. episkopov, episcopos, which was corrupted by our Saxon ancestors into (Anglo-Saxon), biscop, and by us into bishop, signifies literally an overseer or superintendent, from epi, over, and skeptomai, I see, a person who had the inspection, overseeing, or superintendence of others. The ancient episkopoi were persons who had the care of different congregations of the Church of Christ; who traveled, preached, enforced the discipline of the Church, and took care to prevent false doctrines, heresies, &c. Those who still deserve this title, and it is an august and noble one, walk by the same rule, and mind the same thing. episkopov, episcopus, or bishop, is a scriptural and sacred title; was gloriously supported in the primitive Church; and many to the present day are not less ornaments to the title, than the title is ornamental to them. The best defenses of the truth of God, and the Protestant faith, are in the works of the bishops of the British Churches.

    The words quoted from the Psalms were originally spoken against the enemies of David; and as David, in certain particulars, was a type of Christ, the words are applied to him in an especial manner who had sinned against his own soul and the life of his Master.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 20. For it is written in the book of Psalms , etc.] In ( Psalm 69:25).

    These are the words of Peter, citing the Scripture he had said must be fulfilled, which the Holy Ghost, by David, had spoke concerning Judas: let his habitation be desolate . The Arabic and Ethiopic versions render it, his city; meaning, perhaps, the city of Jerusalem; and which afterwards did become desolate, and was utterly destroyed: and let no man dwell therein ; in his habitation. The psalm, out of which these words are cited, is a psalm concerning the Messiah, and there are many passages cited out of it in the New Testament, and applied to him, or referred unto; (see John 2:17 15:25 19:28 Romans 15:3) compared with ( Psalm 69:4,9,21) and what the psalmist says of the enemies of the Messiah in general, is applied by the apostle to Judas in particular. In the Hebrew text, in ( Psalm 69:25) the words are in the plural number, let their habitation be desolate, and let none dwell in their tents; and refer to all the enemies of Christ, the chief priests, elders of the people, Scribes and Pharisees, who covenanted with Judas to give him so much money to betray Christ into their hands; and who delivered him to the Roman governor, by whom, at their instigation, he was crucified; and particularly may well be thought to include Judas, who betrayed him to them; and therefore are very fitly interpreted of him: though not to be understood to the exclusion of the others, whose house was to be left desolate, and was left desolate, as our Lord predicted, ( Matthew 23:38). The first word in the Hebrew text rendered habitation, signifies a very magnificent dwelling; it is sometimes translated a castle, ( Genesis 25:16, Numbers 31:10, 1 Chronicles 6:54) and sometimes a palace, Cant. 8:9, ( Ezekiel 25:4) and it is interpreted by wmra , a palace, here, by several Jewish writers f42 ; and so may intend the dwelling places of the richer sort of Christs enemies, as the palaces of the high priest, and of the prince, or president of the sanhedrim, and the stately houses of the members of it, of the chief priests and elders of the people, and of the Scribes and Pharisees; all which became desolate at the destruction of Jerusalem: the other word, rendered tents, may design the cottages of the meaner sort of people, who, with united voices, cried aloud for the crucifixion of Christ; and which also shared the same fate when Jerusalem was destroyed: now inasmuch as Judas was of the meaner sort, the apostle here makes use of a word which signifies but a poor and mean habitation, though it is sometimes used of grander ones, and which seems to answer to the latter; for as there are two words in the original text expressive of habitation, he might choose which he would, and did choose that which was most pertinent in the application of the passage to Judas. However, a Jew has no reason to find fault with this version, since the Targum renders both words by habitation, thus; let their habitation be desolate, and in their habitations let no one dwell : where Judass habitation was is not certain; but that he might have one as well as the Apostle John, is not at all improbable, and from hence seems evident: and his bishopric let another take ; which passage stands in ( <19A908> Psalm 109:8) and is fitly applied to Judas, and was verified in him, who not only died a violent and infamous death, by which he was in consequence stripped of his office, as a bishop, or overseer; but another was to be put into it, invested with it, and exercise it; and therefore very pertinently does Peter produce it, his intention being to move the disciples to choose another in his room. These words are produced by the apostle, as if they were to be found in the same place with the preceding; whereas they stand in another psalm, as has been observed: and this is no unusual thing with the writers of the New Testament, to put several passages of Scripture together, as if they were in one place, when they are to be sought for in different places; an instance of this, among many, that might be mentioned, is in ( Romans 3:10-18) and this is a very common way of citing Scripture with the Jews. Surenhusius has given a variety of instances, in proof of this, out of their writings, as in the margin f44 , which the learned reader may consult and compare at leisure. The psalm, out of which this passage is cited, is not to be understood of David literally, and of what he met with from his enemies, and of his imprecations upon them, either Doeg the Edomite, as Kimchi interprets it, or Ahithophel, as others, but of the Messiah, with whom the whole agrees; against whom the mouth of the wicked Jews, and particularly of the deceitful Pharisees, were opened; and against whom the false witnesses spoke with lying tongues; and who, all of them, compassed him with words of hatred to take away his life, and acted a most ungenerous and ungrateful part; opposed him without a cause, and became his enemies for his love showed to them, both to soul and body, preaching the Gospel, and healing diseases, ( <19A902> Psalm 109:2-5). The poverty and distress he submitted to; the griefs and sorrows which he bore; the fatigues he underwent at his examination; and the weakness of body he was then reduced to, as well as the reproach cast upon him on the cross, when his enemies shook their heads at him, are in a very lively manner described, ( <19A922> Psalm 109:22-25) and whereas one of his enemies particularly is singled out from the rest, what is said concerning him, by way of imprecation, suits with Judas, and had its accomplishment in him, ( <19A906> Psalm 109:6-8) who had a wicked man set over him, as over the rest of the Jews, Pilate, the Roman governor, a very wicked man; and at whose right hand Satan stood, as one of his council, as Aben Ezra interprets it, and put it into his heart to betray his master, and prompted him to it, and then accused him of it, and brought him to black despair for it; and who, when this affair was brought home to his own conscience, and there arraigned for it, was convicted and self-condemned, as he also will be at the general judgment; and as he found no place of mercy then, whatever prayers or entreaties he might make, so neither will he hereafter: his days were but few, being cut off in the prime of them, as may be concluded from the many years which some of his fellow apostles lived after him; and his bishopric, or office, as an apostle, was taken by another, even by Matthias, who was chosen in his room, of which we have an account in the following part of this chapter; for this is to be understood neither of his money, nor of his wife, nor of his own soul committed to his trust, as some of the Jewish writers explain it; but of his apostleship, with which he was invested by Christ. The word signifies an oversight, care, or charge; and so the Hebrew word hdwqp is rendered in ( Numbers 3:32,36) and designs any office, as the office of the priests and Levites in the house of God; (see Numbers 4:16). Jarchi interprets it here by wtlwdg , his greatness, or dignity; and explains it by the Spanish word provostia, an office of honour and authority, as this of being an apostle of Christ was; than which, a greater external dignity could not be enjoyed in the church of God, in which he has set first apostles, ( 1 Corinthians 12:28). That this psalm refers to Judas Iscariot, and to his affair, was so clear a point with the ancients, that they used to call it the Iscariotic Psalm. I lay no stress upon the observation some have made, that thirty curses are contained in it, the number of the pieces of silver for which he betrayed his master, since this may be thought to be too curious.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 15-26 - The great thing the apostles were to attest to the world, was, Christ' resurrection; for that was the great proof of his being the Messiah and the foundation of our hope in him. The apostles were ordained, no to wordly dignity and dominion, but to preach Christ, and the power of his resurrection. An appeal was made to God; "Thou, Lord, who knowes the hearts of all men," which we do not; and better than they know their own. It is fit that God should choose his own servants; and s far as he, by the disposals of his providence, or the gifts of his Spirit, shows whom he was chosen, or what he has chosen for us, we ought to fall in with his will. Let us own his hand in the determinin everything which befalls us, especially in those by which any trust ma be committed to us __________________________________________________________________


    Greek Textus Receptus


    γεγραπται
    1125 5769 V-RPI-3S γαρ 1063 CONJ εν 1722 PREP βιβλω 976 N-DSF ψαλμων 5568 N-GPM γενηθητω 1096 5676 V-AOM-3S η 3588 T-NSF επαυλις 1886 N-NSF αυτου 846 P-GSM ερημος 2048 A-NSF και 2532 CONJ μη 3361 PRT-N εστω 2077 5749 V-PXM-3S ο 3588 T-NSM κατοικων 2730 5723 V-PAP-NSM εν 1722 PREP αυτη 846 P-DSF και 2532 CONJ την 3588 T-ASF επισκοπην 1984 N-ASF αυτου 846 P-GSM λαβοι 2983 5630 V-2AAO-3S ετερος 2087 A-NSM

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    20.
    Habitation (epauliv). Only here in New Testament. The word is used in classical Greek of a place for cattle. So Herodotus (i., 111): "The herdsman took the child in his arms, and went back the way he had come, till he reached the fold" (epaulin). Also of a farm-building, a country-house..

    Bishopric (episkophn). See on 1 Pet. ii. 12. Rev., better, office, with overseership in margin. Compare Luke xix. 44.

    Another (eterov). And different person. See on ch. ii. 4.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    1:20 {For it is written} (gegraptai gar). Luke here returns to the address of Peter interrupted by verses #18,19. Perfect passive indicative, the usual idiom in quoting scripture, stands written. #Ps 69 is often quoted as Messianic in Matthew and John. {His habitation} (he epaulis autou). Only here in the N.T., a country house, cottage, cabin. {His office} (ten episkopen autou). Our word bishopric (Authorized Version) is from this word, office of bishop (episcopos). Only that is not the idea here, but over-seership (epi, skopew) or office as in #1Pe 2:12. It means to visit and to inspect, to look over. The ecclesiastical sense comes later (#1Ti 3:1).


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

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