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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 27:1


    CHAPTERS: Acts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     

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    King James Bible - Acts 27:1

    And when it was determined that we should sail into Italy, they delivered Paul and certain other prisoners unto one named Julius, a centurion of Augustus' band.

    World English Bible

    When it was determined that we should sail for Italy, they delivered Paul and certain other prisoners to a centurion named Julius, of the Augustan band.

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 27:1

    AND when it was determined that he should sail into Italy, and that Paul, with the other prisoners, should be delivered to a centurion, named Julius, of the band Augusta,

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And when it was determined that we should sail into Italy, they delivered Paul and certain other prisoners to one named Julius, a centurion of Augustus' band.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    ως
    5613 ADV δε 1161 CONJ εκριθη 2919 5681 V-API-3S του 3588 T-GSM αποπλειν 636 5721 V-PAN ημας 2248 P-1AP εις 1519 PREP την 3588 T-ASF ιταλιαν 2482 N-ASF παρεδιδουν 3860 5707 V-IAI-3P τον 3588 T-ASM τε 5037 PRT παυλον 3972 N-ASM και 2532 CONJ τινας 5100 X-APM ετερους 2087 A-APM δεσμωτας 1202 N-APM εκατονταρχη 1543 N-DSM ονοματι 3686 N-DSN ιουλιω 2457 N-DSM σπειρης 4686 N-GSF σεβαστης 4575 A-GSF

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (1) -
    Ac 19:21; 23:11; 25:12,25 Ge 50:20 Ps 33:11; 76:10 Pr 19:21 La 3:27

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 27:1

    ¶ Mas como fue determinado que habíamos de navegar para Italia, entregaron a Pablo y algunos otros presos a un centurin, llamado Julio, de la compaía Augusta.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 27:1

    Verse 1. And when it was determined, &c.] That is, when the
    governor had given orders to carry Paul to Rome, according to his appeal; together with other prisoners who were bound for the same place.

    We should sail] By this it is evident that St. Luke was with Paul; and it is on this account that he was enabled to give such a circumstantial account of the voyage.

    Julius, a centurion of Augustus' band.] Lipsius has found the name of this cohort on an ancient marble; see Lips. in Tacit. Hist. lib. ii. The same cohort is mentioned by Suetonius, in his life of Nero, 20.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 1. And when it was determined that we should sail into Italy , etc.] The chief city of which was Rome, the metropolis of the empire, where Caesar had his palace, to whom the apostle had appealed; and his voyage thither was determined by Festus, with the advice of Agrippa and his council, pursuant to the apostles appeal, and which was founded on the will of God; all which concurred in this affair: it was the decree and will of God that the apostle should go to Rome, which was made known to him; and it was his resolution upon that, to go thither, wherefore he appealed to Caesar; and it was the determination of the Roman governor, not only as to his going there, but as to the time of it, which was now fixed: the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Arabic versions, read he, instead of we; and the Ethiopic version reads expressly Paul; but the Greek copies read we: by whom are meant the apostle, and his companions; as Luke the writer of this history, and Aristarchus the Macedonian mentioned in the next verse, and Trophimus the Ephesian, who was afterwards left at Miletus sick, ( 2 Timothy 4:20) and who else cannot be said; these were to sail with him to Italy, not as prisoners, but as companions: this resolution being taken, they delivered Paul and certain other prisoners ; who very likely had also appealed to Caesar, or at least the governor thought fit to send them to Rome, to have their cases heard and determined there; and these by the order of Festus were delivered by the centurions, or jailers, in whose custody they had been, unto one called Julius ; in the Alexandrian copy of the third verse, he is called Julianus; he was either one of the Julian family, or rather was one that had been made free by some of that family, and so took the name: a centurion of Augustus band ; of a Roman band of soldiers, which belonged to that legion which was called Augusta; for it seems there was a legion that bore that name, as Lipsius observes, and it may be from Augustus Caesar.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-11 - It was determined by the
    counsel of God, before it was determined by the counsel of Festus, that Paul should go to Rome; for God had wor for him to do there. The course they steered, and the places the touched at, are here set down. And God here encourages those who suffe for him, to trust in him; for he can put it into the hearts of those to befriend them, from whom they least expect it. Sailors must make the best of the wind: and so must we all in our passage over the ocean of this world. When the winds are contrary, yet we must be getting forwar as well as we can. Many who are not driven backward by cros providences, do not get forward by favourable providences. And man real Christians complain as to the concerns of their souls, that the have much ado to keep their ground. Every fair haven is not a saf haven. Many show respect to good ministers, who will not take their advice. But the event will convince sinners of the vanity of their hopes, and the folly of their conduct.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    ως
    5613 ADV δε 1161 CONJ εκριθη 2919 5681 V-API-3S του 3588 T-GSM αποπλειν 636 5721 V-PAN ημας 2248 P-1AP εις 1519 PREP την 3588 T-ASF ιταλιαν 2482 N-ASF παρεδιδουν 3860 5707 V-IAI-3P τον 3588 T-ASM τε 5037 PRT παυλον 3972 N-ASM και 2532 CONJ τινας 5100 X-APM ετερους 2087 A-APM δεσμωτας 1202 N-APM εκατονταρχη 1543 N-DSM ονοματι 3686 N-DSN ιουλιω 2457 N-DSM σπειρης 4686 N-GSF σεβαστης 4575 A-GSF

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    1.
    Sail (apoplein). Lit., sail away.

    Band. See on Mark xv. 16.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    27:1 {That we should sail} (tou apoplein hemas). this genitive articular infinitive with ekriqe like the LXX construction translating the Hebrew infinitive construct is awkward in Greek. Several similar examples in #Lu 17:1; Ac 10:25; 20:3 (Robertson, _Grammar_, p. 1068). Luke alone uses this old verb in N.T. He uses nine compounds of plew, to sail. Note the reappearance of "we" in the narrative. It is possible, of course, that Luke was not with Paul during the series of trials at Caesarea, or at least, not all the time. But it is natural for Luke to use "we" again because he and Aristarchus are travelling with Paul. In Caesarea Paul was the center of the action all the time whether Luke was present or not. The great detail and minute accuracy of Luke's account of this voyage and shipwreck throw more light upon ancient seafaring than everything else put together. Smith's _Voyage and Shipwreck of St. Paul_ is still a classic on the subject. Though so accurate in his use of sea terms, yet Luke writes like a landsman, not like a sailor. Besides, the character of Paul is here revealed in a remarkable fashion. {They delivered} (paredidoun). Imperfect active wmega form rather than the old -mi form paredidosan as in #4:33, from paradidwmi. Perhaps the imperfect notes the continuance of the handing over. {Certain other prisoners} (tinas heterous desmwtas). Bound (desmwtas) like Paul, but not necessarily appellants to Caesar, perhaps some of them condemned criminals to amuse the Roman populace in the gladiatorial shows, most likely pagans though heterous does not have to mean different kind of prisoners from Paul. {Of the Augustan band} (speires sebastes). Note Ionic genitive speires, not speiras. See on Mt 27:1; Ac 10:1. cohortis augustae. We do not really know why this cohort is called "Augustan." It may be that it is part of the imperial commissariat (_frumentarii_) since Julius assumes chief authority in the grain ship (verse #11). These legionary centurions when in Rome were called _peregrini_ (foreigners) because their work was chiefly in the provinces. this man Julius may have been one of them.


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