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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 26:1


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    King James Bible - Acts 26:1

    Then Agrippa said unto Paul, Thou art permitted to speak for thyself. Then Paul stretched forth the hand, and answered for himself:

    World English Bible

    Agrippa said to Paul, "You may speak for yourself." Then Paul stretched out his
    hand, and made his defense.

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 26:1

    THEN Agrippa said to Paul: Thou
    art permitted to speak for thyself. Then Paul stretching forth his hand, began to make his answer.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Then Agrippa said to Paul, Thou
    art permitted to speak for thyself. Then Paul stretched forth the hand, and answered for himself:

    Greek Textus Receptus


    αγριππας
    67 N-NSM δε 1161 CONJ προς 4314 PREP τον 3588 T-ASM παυλον 3972 N-ASM εφη 5346 5713 V-IXI-3S επιτρεπεται 2010 5743 V-PPI-3S σοι 4671 P-2DS υπερ 5228 PREP σεαυτου 4572 F-2GSM λεγειν 3004 5721 V-PAN τοτε 5119 ADV ο 3588 T-NSM παυλος 3972 N-NSM απελογειτο 626 5711 V-INI-3S εκτεινας 1614 5660 V-AAP-NSF την 3588 T-ASF χειρα 5495 N-ASF

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (1) -
    Ac 25:16 Pr 18:13,17 Joh 7:51

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 26:1

    ¶ Entonces Agripa dijo a Pablo: Se te permite hablar por ti mismo . Pablo entonces, extendiendo la mano, comenz a dar razn por sí, diciendo :

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 26:1

    Verse 1. Then
    Paul stretched forth the hand] This act, as we have already seen on chap. xxi. 40, was merely to gain attention; it was no rhetorical flourish, nor designed for one. From knowing, partly by descriptions, and partly by ancient statues, how orators and others who address a concourse of people stood, we can easily conceive the attitude of St. Paul. When the right hand was stretched out, the left remained under the cloak, which being thrown off the right shoulder, to give the arm the fuller liberty, it then rested on the left: under these circumstances, the hand could be stretched out gracefully, but was confined to no one attitude, though the third and fourth fingers were generally clenched.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 1. Then
    Agrippa said unto Paul , etc.] After Festus had made the above speech to him, and to all present, and had introduced the affair of Paul, who now stood before them: thou art permitted to speak for thyself ; which a prisoner might not do, until he had leave; and this leave was granted by Festus the Roman governor, who was properly the judge, and not Agrippa, though the permission might be by both; and so the Arabic and Ethiopic versions read, we have ordered, or permitted thee, etc. Then Paul stretched forth the hand ; as orators used to do, when they were about to speak; or else to require silence; or it may be to show the freedom of his mind, and how ready he was to embrace the opportunity of pleading his own cause; being conscious to himself of his innocence, and relying on the ingenuity and integrity of his judge; and especially of the king, before whom he stood: and answered for himself ; or made an apology, or spoke in vindication of himself, in order to remove the charges brought against him.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-11 - Christianity
    teaches us to give a reason of the hope that is in us, an also to give honour to whom honour is due, without flattery or fear of man. Agrippa was well versed in the Scriptures of the Old Testament therefore could the better judge as to the controversy about Jesu being the Messiah. Surely ministers may expect, when they preach the faith of Christ, to be heard patiently. Paul professes that he stil kept to all the good in which he was first educated and trained up. Se here what his religion was. He was a moralist, a man of virtue, and ha not learned the arts of the crafty, covetous Pharisees; he was no chargeable with any open vice and profaneness. He was sound in the faith. He always had a holy regard for the ancient promise made of God unto the fathers, and built his hope upon it. The apostle knew very well that all this would not justify him before God, yet he knew it wa for his reputation among the Jews, and an argument that he was not suc a man as they represented him to be. Though he counted this but loss that he might win Christ, yet he mentioned it when it might serve to honour Christ. See here what Paul's religion is; he has not such zea for the ceremonial law as he had in his youth; the sacrifices an offerings appointed by that, are done away by the great Sacrifice whic they typified. Of the ceremonial cleansings he makes no conscience, an thinks the Levitical priesthood is done away in the priesthood of Christ; but, as to the main principles of his religion, he is a zealous as ever. Christ and heaven, are the two great doctrines of the gospel; that God has given to us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. These are the matter of the promise made unto the fathers. The temple service, or continual course of religious duties, day and night was kept up as the profession of faith in the promise of eternal life and in expectation of it. The prospect of eternal life should engage u to be diligent and stedfast in all religious exercises. Yet the Sadducees hated Paul for preaching the resurrection; and the other Jew joined them, because he testified that Jesus was risen, and was the promised Redeemer of Israel. Many things are thought to be beyon belief, only because the infinite nature and perfections of Him tha has revealed, performed, or promised them, are overlooked. Pau acknowledged, that while he continued a Pharisee, he was a bitter enem to Christianity. This was his character and manner of life in the beginning of his time; and there was every thing to hinder his being Christian. Those who have been most strict in their conduct befor conversion, will afterwards see abundant reason for humblin themselves, even on account of things which they then thought ought to have been done.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    αγριππας
    67 N-NSM δε 1161 CONJ προς 4314 PREP τον 3588 T-ASM παυλον 3972 N-ASM εφη 5346 5713 V-IXI-3S επιτρεπεται 2010 5743 V-PPI-3S σοι 4671 P-2DS υπερ 5228 PREP σεαυτου 4572 F-2GSM λεγειν 3004 5721 V-PAN τοτε 5119 ADV ο 3588 T-NSM παυλος 3972 N-NSM απελογειτο 626 5711 V-INI-3S εκτεινας 1614 5660 V-AAP-NSF την 3588 T-ASF χειρα 5495 N-ASF

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    26:1 {Thou
    art permitted} (epitrepetai soi). Literally, It is permitted thee. As if Agrippa were master of ceremonies instead of Festus. Agrippa as a king and guest presides at the grand display while Festus has simply introduced Paul. {For thyself} (huper seautou). Some MSS. have peri (concerning). Paul is allowed to speak in his own behalf. No charges are made against him. In fact, Festus has admitted that he has no real proof of any charges. {Stretched forth his hand} (ekteinas ten ceira). Dramatic oratorical gesture (not for silence as in #12:17; 13:16) with the chain still upon it (verse #29) linking him to the guard. First aorist active participle of ekteinw, to stretch out. {Made his defence} (apelogeito). Inchoative imperfect of apologeomai (middle), "began to make his defence." this is the fullest of all Paul's defences. He has no word of censure of his enemies or of resentment, but seizes the opportunity to preach Christ to such a distinguished company which he does with "singular dignity" (Furneaux). He is now bearing the name of Christ "before kings" (#Ac 9:15). In general Paul follows the line of argument of the speech on the stairs (chapter #Ac 22).


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