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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 6:1


    CHAPTERS: Acts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     

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    King James Bible - Acts 6:1

    And in those days, when the number of the disciples was multiplied, there arose a murmuring of the Grecians against the Hebrews, because their widows were neglected in the daily ministration.

    World English Bible

    Now in those days, when the
    number of the disciples was multiplying, a complaint arose from the Hellenists against the Hebrews, because their widows were neglected in the daily service.

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 6:1

    AND in those days, the
    number of the disciples increasing, there arose a murmuring of the Greeks against the Hebrews, for that their widows were neglected in the daily ministration.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And in those days, when the
    number of the disciples was multiplied, there arose a murmuring of the Grecians against the Hebrews, because their widows were neglected in the daily ministration.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    εν
    1722 PREP δε 1161 CONJ ταις 3588 T-DPF ημεραις 2250 N-DPF ταυταις 3778 D-DPF πληθυνοντων 4129 5723 V-PAP-GPM των 3588 T-GPM μαθητων 3101 N-GPM εγενετο 1096 5633 V-2ADI-3S γογγυσμος 1112 N-NSM των 3588 T-GPM ελληνιστων 1675 N-GPM προς 4314 PREP τους 3588 T-APM εβραιους 1445 A-APM οτι 3754 CONJ παρεθεωρουντο 3865 5712 V-IPI-3P εν 1722 PREP τη 3588 T-DSF διακονια 1248 N-DSF τη 3588 T-DSF καθημερινη 2522 A-DSF αι 3588 T-NPF χηραι 5503 N-NPF αυτων 846 P-GPM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (1) -
    :7; 2:41,47; 4:4; 5:14,28 Ps 72:16; 110:3 Isa 27:6 Jer 30:19

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 6:1

    ¶ En aquellos días, creciendo el nmero de los discípulos, hubo murmuracin de los griegos contra los hebreos, de que sus viudas eran menospreciadas en el ministerio cotidiano.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 6:1

    Verse 1. A murmuring of the Grecians against the Hebrews] Those who are here termed Grecians, ellhnistai, or Hellenists, were
    Jews who sojourned now at Jerusalem, but lived in countries where the Greek language was spoken, and probably in general knew no other. They are distinguished here from those called Hebrews, by which we are to understand native Jews, who spoke what was then termed the Hebrew language, a sort of Chaldaio-Syriac.

    It has been remarked that Greek words ending in isthv imply inferiority.

    ellhnev, Hellenes, was distinguished from ellhnistai: the former implies pure Greeks, native Greeks, who spoke the Greek tongue in its purity; and the latter, Jews or others sojourning among the Greeks, but who spoke the Greek language according to the Hebrew idiom. Pythagoras divided his disciples into two classes; those who were capable of entering into the spirit and mystery of his doctrine he called puqagoreioi, Pythagoreans; those who were of a different cast he termed puqagoristai, Pythagorists: the former were eminent and worthy of their master; the latter only so so. The same distinction is made between those called attikoi and attikistai, Attics and Atticists, the pure and less pure Greeks, as between those called ellhnev and ellhnistai, Hellenes and Hellenists, pure Greeks and Graecising Jews. See Jamblicus, Deuteronomy Vit. Pyth. cap. 18, and Schoettgen on this place.

    The cause of the murmuring mentioned here seems to have been this: When all the disciples had put their property into a common stock, it was intended that out of it each should have his quantum of supply. The foreign or Hellenistic Jews began to be jealous, that their widows were neglected in the daily ministration, that they either had not the proportion, or were not duly served; the Palestine Jews being partial to those of their own country. This shows that the community of goods could never have been designed to become general. Indeed, it was no ordinance of God; and, in any state of society, must be in general impracticable. The apostles, hearing of this murmuring, came to the resolution mentioned below.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 1. And in those days, when the number of the disciples was multiplied , etc.] From an hundred and twenty to three thousand more, from thence to five thousand more, and after that a multitude of men and women were added, and still they were increasing; (see Acts 1:15) ( Acts 2:41 4:4 5:14). This increase of the disciples agrees with what Maimonides says f239 , before observed, that in the days of Gamaliel, ynym wbr , the heretics were multiplied in Israel.

    The word disciples was a common name to all Christians, to all that believed in Christ, and was the name they went by, before they were called Christians, ( Acts 11:26) there arose a murmuring of the Grecians, or Hellenists, against the Hebrews ; by the Hebrews are meant the Jews that dwelt in Judea, and were the inhabitants of that country, and chiefly of Jerusalem, who spoke the Hebrew, or rather the Syriac language; and by the Grecians, or Hellenists, are meant, not the Greeks that were proselyted to the Jewish religion, though there might be some few among them; but Jews who were born, and had dwelt, in some parts of Greece, and spoke the Greek language, and used the Septuagint version of the Bible; between these two a murmuring arose, a complaint was made by one against the other: so that, as it appears from the instance of Ananias and Sapphira, that this first and pure Gospel church was not free from hypocrites; it is also manifest, that though they were at first so united and harmonious in their affections and judgments, yet they were not always clear of feuds, animosities, and contentions; Satan bestirred himself, and got footing among them, as he commonly does where the Gospel is preached, and there is an increase of it: the reason of this uneasiness was, because their widows were neglected in the daily ministration ; that is, they had not that distributed which was necessary for them, nor so much as the Hebrew widows; they complained of partiality, as if because the Hebrew widows were the natives of the country, and might be nearly related to many of the community, that therefore they were more regarded and better supplied every day, than their widows were, whose husbands had dwelt in foreign lands, and were not so well known, and had fewer acquaintance and relations; for it seems the ministration or distribution was made every day: and such a practice obtained among the Jews in common, who used to collect every day for the poor, and give it daily to them. Maimonides f240 speaks of it in this manner; they appoint collectors, who receive every day, from every court, a piece of bread, or any sort of food, or fruit, or money, from whomsoever that offers freely for the time; and they divide that which is collected, in the evening, among the poor, and they give to every poor person of it his daily sustenance; and this is called ywjmt , Tamchui, or the alms dish.

    And from hence the apostles might take up this custom, and follow it. The Ethiopic version renders it, because they saw their widows minister, or employed daily; as if the complaint was, that their widows were too much made use of, and obliged to more frequent and to harder service in taking care of the poor, the sick, and helpless, than the other widows were, who had not their share of labour with them, but lived more at ease.

    Though others rather think the murmur was, because the Grecian widows were not taken into the number, and employed in taking care of the poor, as the Hebrew widows were; but the sense first given, of not having so good a share in the distribution, seems to be the best.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-7 - Hitherto the disciples had been of one accord; this often had bee noticed to their honour; but now they were multiplied, they began to murmur. The word of God was enough to take up all the thoughts, cares and time of the apostles. The persons chosen to serve tables must be duly qualified. They must be filled with gifts and graces of the Holy Ghost, necessary to rightly managing this trust; men of truth, an hating covetousness. All who are employed in the service of the church ought to be commended to the Divine grace by the prayers of the church They blessed them in the name of the Lord. The word and grace of God are greatly magnified, when those are wrought upon by it, who wer least likely.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    εν
    1722 PREP δε 1161 CONJ ταις 3588 T-DPF ημεραις 2250 N-DPF ταυταις 3778 D-DPF πληθυνοντων 4129 5723 V-PAP-GPM των 3588 T-GPM μαθητων 3101 N-GPM εγενετο 1096 5633 V-2ADI-3S γογγυσμος 1112 N-NSM των 3588 T-GPM ελληνιστων 1675 N-GPM προς 4314 PREP τους 3588 T-APM εβραιους 1445 A-APM οτι 3754 CONJ παρεθεωρουντο 3865 5712 V-IPI-3P εν 1722 PREP τη 3588 T-DSF διακονια 1248 N-DSF τη 3588 T-DSF καθημερινη 2522 A-DSF αι 3588 T-NPF χηραι 5503 N-NPF αυτων 846 P-GPM

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    1. And (de). Better but, as a contrast is now introduced with the prosperous condition of the
    Church indicated at the close of the last chapter.

    Was multiplied (plhqunontwn). Lit., "when the disciples were multiplying;" the present participle indicating something in progress. A murmuring (goggusmov). See on the kindred word murmerers, Jude 16.

    Grecians (Ellhnistwn). Rev., much better, Grecian Jews, with Hellenists in margin. "Grecians" might easily be understood of Greeks in general. The word Hellenists denotes Jews, not Greeks, but Jews who spoke Greek. The contact of Jews with Greeks was first effected by the conquests of Alexander. He settled eight thousand Jews in the Thebais, and the Jews formed a third of the population of his new city of Alexandria. From Egypt they gradually spread along the whole Mediterranean coast of Africa. They were removed by Seleucus Nicator from Babylonia, by thousands, to Antioch and Seleucia, and under the persecutions of Antiochus Epiphanes scattered themselves through Asia Minor, Greece, Macedonia, and the Aegean islands. The vast majority of them adopted the Greek language, and forgot the Aramaic dialect which had been their language since the Captivity. The word is used but twice in the New Testament - here and ch. ix. 29 - and, in both cases, of Jews who had embraced Christianity, but who spoke Greek and used the Septuagint version of the Bible instead of the original Hebrew or the Chaldaic targum or paraphrase. The word %Ellhn, which is very common in the New Testament, is used in antithesis, either to "Barbarians" or to "Jews." In the former case it means all nations which spoke the Greek language (see Acts xviii. 17; Rom. i. 14; 1 Cor. i. 22, 23). In the latter it is equivalent to Gentiles (see Rom. i. 16; ii. 9; 1 Corinthians x. 32; Gal. ii. 3). Hence, in either case, it is wholly different from Hellenist.

    Hebrews. Hebrew is the proper antithesis to Hellenist. A man was 'Ioudaiov, a Jew, who traced his descent from Jacob, and conformed to the religion of his fathers. He might speak Greek and be a Hellenist. He was 'Ebraiov, a Hebrew, only as he spoke Hebrew and retained Hebrew customs. The distinction between Hebrew and Hellenist was a distinction within the Jewish nation, and not between it and other nations. Thus Paul calls himself a Hebrew of Hebrews; i.e., a Hebrew and of Hebrew parents (Philip. iii. 5; compare 2 Cor. xi. 22).

    Were neglected (pareqewrounto). Only here in New Testament. Lit., were overlooked. The imperfect denoting something habitual.

    Daily (kaqhmerinh). Only here in New Testament.

    Ministration (diakonia). Or service. See on minister, Matt. xx. 26. The reference is to the distribution of provision.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    6:1 {When the number of the disciples was multiplying} (plequnontwn twn maqetwn). Genitive absolute of plequnw, old verb from pleqos, fulness, to increase. The new freedom from the intercession of Gamaliel was bearing rich fruit. {A murmuring of the Grecian Jews} (goggusmos twn hellenistwn). Late onomatopoetic word (LXX) from the late verb gogguzw, to mutter, to murmur. The substantive occurs also in #Joh 7:12; Php 2:14; 1Pe 4:9. It is the secret grumblings that buzz away till they are heard. These "Grecian Jews" or Hellenists are members of the church in Jerusalem who are Jews from outside of Palestine like Barnabas from Cyprus. These Hellenists had points of contact with the Gentile world without having gone over to the habits of the Gentiles, the Jews of the Western Dispersion. They spoke Greek. {Against the Hebrews} (pros tous ebraious). The Jewish Christians from Jerusalem and Palestine. The Aramaean Jews of the Eastern Dispersion are usually classed with the Hebrew (speaking Aramaic) as distinct from the Grecian Jews or Hellenists. {Were neglected} (pareqewrounto). Imperfect passive of paraqewrew, old verb, to examine things placed beside (para) each other, to look beyond (para also), to overlook, to neglect. Here only in the N.T. These widows may receive daily (kaqemerinei, late adjective from kaq' hemeran, only here in the N.T.) help from the common fund provided for all who need it (#Ac 4:32-37). The temple funds for widows were probably not available for those who have now become Christians. Though they were all Christians here concerned, yet the same line of cleavage existed as among the other Jews (Hebrew or Aramaean Jews and Hellenists). It is not here said that the murmuring arose among the widows, but because of them. Women and money occasion the first serious disturbance in the church life. There was evident sensitiveness that called for wisdom.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

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