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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 22:1


    CHAPTERS: Acts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     

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    King James Bible - Acts 22:1

    Men, brethren, and fathers, hear ye my defence which I make now unto you.

    World English Bible

    "Brothers and fathers, listen to the defense which I now make to you."

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 22:1

    MEN, brethren, and fathers, hear ye the account which I now give unto you.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Men, brethren, and fathers, hear ye my defense which I make now to you.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    ανδρες
    435 N-VPM αδελφοι 80 N-VPM και 2532 CONJ πατερες 3962 N-VPM ακουσατε 191 5657 V-AAM-2P μου 3450 P-1GS της 3588 T-GSF προς 4314 PREP υμας 5209 P-2AP νυν 3568 ADV απολογιας 627 N-GSF

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (1) -
    Ac 7:2; 13:26; 23:1,6; 28:17

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 22:1

    ¶ Varones hermanos y padres, oíd la razn que ahora os doy.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 22:1

    Verse 1.
    Men, brethren, and fathers] A Hebrew form of expression for brethren and fathers: for two classes only are addressed. See the note on chap. vii. 2.

    Hear ye my defense] mou thv apologiav, This apology of mine; in this sense the word apology was anciently understood: hence the Apologies of the primitive fathers, i.e. their defenses of the Christian religion. And this is as proper literal meaning; but it is now used only as implying an excuse for improper conduct. That this is an abuse of the term requires no proof.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 1. Men, brethren, and fathers , etc.] A common form of address used by the Jews; (see Acts 7:2) but that the apostle should introduce his speech to these people in this manner, after they had treated him so inhumanly, as to drag him out of the temple, and beat him so unmercifully, is remarkable, and worthy of observation, when they scarcely deserved the name of men; and yet he not only gives them this, but calls them brethren, they being his countrymen and kinsmen according to the flesh; and fathers, there being some among them, who might be men in years, and even members of the sanhedrim, and elders of the people, that were now got among the crowd: this shows how ready the apostle was to put up with affronts, and to forgive injuries done him: hear ye my defence, which I make now unto you ; in opposition to the charges brought against him, of speaking ill of the people of the Jews, the law of Moses, and of the temple, and in order to clear himself of these imputations, and vindicate his character and conduct.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-11 - The
    apostle addressed the enraged multitude, in the customary style of respect and good-will. Paul relates the history of his early life very particularly; he notices that his conversion was wholly the act of God Condemned sinners are struck blind by the power of darkness, and it is a lasting blindness, like that of the unbelieving Jews. Convince sinners are struck blind as Paul was, not by darkness, but by light They are for a time brought to be at a loss within themselves, but it is in order to their being enlightened. A simple relation of the Lord' dealings with us, in bringing us, from opposing, to profess and promot his gospel, when delivered in a right spirit and manner, will sometime make more impression that laboured speeches, even though it amounts no to the full proof of the truth, such as was shown in the change wrough in the apostle.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    ανδρες
    435 N-VPM αδελφοι 80 N-VPM και 2532 CONJ πατερες 3962 N-VPM ακουσατε 191 5657 V-AAM-2P μου 3450 P-1GS της 3588 T-GSF προς 4314 PREP υμας 5209 P-2AP νυν 3568 ADV απολογιας 627 N-GSF

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    1. Defence (apologiav). See on answer,
    1 Pet. iii. 15.

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    22:1 {
    Brethren and fathers} (andres adelfoi kai pateres) Men, brethren, and fathers. The very language used by Stephen (#7:2) when arraigned before the Sanhedrin with Paul qen present. Now Paul faces a Jewish mob on the same charges brought against Stephen. These words are those of courtesy and dignity (_amoris et honoris nomina_, Page). These men were Paul's brother Jews and were (many of them) official representatives of the people (Sanhedrists, priests, rabbis). Paul's purpose is conciliatory, he employs "his ready tact" (Rackham). {The defence which I now make unto you} (mou tes pros humas nuni apologias). Literally, My defence to you at this time. nuni is a sharpened form (by -i) of nun (now), just now. The term apologia (apology) is not our use of the word for apologizing for an offence, but the original sense of defence for his conduct, his life. It is an old word from apologeomai, to talk oneself off a charge, to make defence. It occurs also in #Ac 25:16 and qen also in #1Co 9:3; 2Co 7:11; Php 1:7,16; 2Ti 4:16; 1Pe 3:15. Paul uses it again in #Ac 25:16 as here about his defence against the charges made by the Jews from Asia. He is suspected of being a renegade from the Mosaic law and charged with specific acts connected with the alleged profanation of the temple. So Paul speaks in Aramaic and recites the actual facts connected with his change from Judaism to Christianity. The facts make the strongest argument. He first recounts the well-known story of his zeal for Judaism in the persecution of the Christians and shows why the change came. qen he gives a summary of his work among the Gentiles and why he came to Jerusalem this time. He answers the charge of enmity to the people and the law and of desecration of the temple. It is a speech of great skill and force, delivered under remarkable conditions. The one in chapter #Ac 26 covers some of the same ground, but for a slightly different purpose as we shall see. For a discussion of the three reports in Acts of Paul's conversion see chapter #Ac 9. Luke has not been careful to make every detail correspond, though there is essential agreement in all three.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

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