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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 26:32


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    King James Bible - Acts 26:32

    Then said Agrippa unto Festus, This man might have been set at liberty, if he had not appealed unto Caesar.

    World English Bible

    Agrippa said to Festus, "This man might have been set free if he had not appealed to Caesar."

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 26:32

    And Agrippa said to Festus: This man might have been set at liberty, if he had not appealed to Caesar.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Then said Agrippa to Festus, This man might have been set at liberty, if he had not appealed to Cesar.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    αγριππας
    67 N-NSM δε 1161 CONJ τω 3588 T-DSM φηστω 5347 N-DSM εφη 5346 5713 V-IXI-3S απολελυσθαι 630 5771 V-RPN εδυνατο 1410 5711 V-INI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM ανθρωπος 444 N-NSM ουτος 3778 D-NSM ει 1487 COND μη 3361 PRT-N επεκεκλητο 1941 5716 V-LDI-3S καισαρα 2541 N-ASM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (32) -
    Ac 25:11,12,25; 28:18

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 26:32

    Y Agripa dijo a Festo: Podía este hombre ser suelto, si no hubiera apelado a Csar.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 26:32

    Verse 32. Then said
    Agrippa, &c.] The king himself, who had participated in the strongest emotions on the occasion, feels himself prompted to wish the apostle's immediate liberation; but this was now rendered impracticable, because he had appealed to Caesar; the appeal was no doubt registered, and the business must now proceed to a full hearing.

    Bp. Pearce conjectures, with great probability, that Agrippa, on his return to Rome, represented Paul's case so favourably to the emperor, or his ministers of state, that he was soon set at liberty there, as may be concluded from chap. xxviii. 30, that he dwelt two whole years in his own hired place; and to the same cause it seems to have been owing that Julius, who had the care of Paul as a prisoner in the ship, treated him courteously; see chap. xxvii. 3, 43. And the same may be gathered from chap. xxviii. 14, 16. So that this defense of the apostle before Agrippa, Bernice, Festus, &c., was ultimately serviceable to his important cause.

    1. THE conversion of Saul was a wonderful work of the Spirit of God; and, as we have already seen, a strong proof of the truth of Christianity; and the apostle himself frequently appeals to it as such.

    2. His mission to the Gentiles was as extraordinary as the calling of the Gentiles itself. Every thing is supernatural in a work of grace; for, because nature cannot produce the effects, the grace of God, which implies the co-operation of his omniscience, omnipotence, and endless mercy, undertakes to perform the otherwise impossible task.

    3. From the commission of St. Paul, we see the state in which the Gentile world was, previously to the preaching of the Gospel.

    1. Their eyes are represented as closed; their understanding was darkened; and they had no right apprehension of spiritual or eternal things.

    2. They were in a state of darkness; living without the knowledge of the true God, in a region where nothing but ignorance prevailed.

    3. They were under the dominion and authority of Satan; they were his vassals, and he claimed them as his right.

    4. They were in a state of guiltiness; living, in almost every respect, in opposition to the dictates even of nature itself.

    5. They were polluted; not only irregular and abominable in their lives, but also impure and unholy in their hearts. Thus far their state.

    Behold what the grace of the Gospel is to do for these Gentiles, in order to redeem them from this state: - 1. It opens their eyes; gives them an understanding, whereby they may discern the truth; and, without this illumination from above, the truth of God can never be properly apprehended.

    2. It turns them from the darkness to the light; a fine metaphor, taken from the act of a blind man, who is continually turning his eyes towards the light, and rolling his eyes upwards towards the sun, and in all directions, that he may collect as many of the scattered rays as he can, in order to form distinct vision. In this way the Gentiles appeared to be, in vain, searching after the light, till the Gospel came, and turned their eyes to the Sun of righteousness.

    3. They are brought from under the bondage and slavery of sin and Satan, to be put under the obedience of Jesus Christ. So that Christ and his grace as truly and as fully rule and govern them as sin and Satan did formerly.

    This is a proof that the change is not by might, nor by power, but by the Spirit of the Lord.

    4. He pardons their sin, so that they are no longer liable to endless perdition.

    5. He sanctifies their nature, so that they are capable of loving and serving him fervently with pure hearts; and are thus rendered fit for the enjoyment of the inheritance among the saints in light.

    Such a salvation, from such a bondage, does the Gospel of Christ offer to the Gentiles-to a lost world. It is with extreme difficulty that any person can be persuaded that he needs a similar work of grace on his heart to that which was necessary for the conversion of the Gentiles. We may rest assured that no man is a Christian merely by birth or education. If Christianity implies the life of God in the soul of man -the remission of sins-the thorough purification of the heart, producing that holiness without which none can see the Lord, then it is evident that God alone can do this work, and that neither birth nor education can bestow it. By birth, every man is sinful; by practice, every man is a transgressor; for all have sinned.

    God alone, by faith in Christ Jesus, can save the sinner from his sins.

    Reader, has God saved thee from this state of wretchedness, and brought thee "into the glorious liberty of his children?" Let thy conscience answer for itself.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 32. Then said Agrippa unto Festus , etc.] As declaring his sense, and by way of advice and counsel; but not as determining anything himself, for that lay in the breast of Festus, the Roman governor and judge: this man might have been set at liberty ; from his bonds and imprisonment; for ought that appears against him, or any law to the contrary: if he had not appealed unto Caesar ; wherefore an inferior judge could not release him; but so it was ordered in divine Providence, that he should appeal to Caesar, that he might go to Rome, and there bear a testimony for Christ; however, this declaration of Agrippa, and what he and the governor and the rest said among themselves, are a considerable proof of the innocence of the apostle.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 24-32 - It becomes us, on all occasions, to speak the
    words of truth an soberness, and then we need not be troubled at the unjust censures of men. Active and laborious followers of the gospel often have bee despised as dreamers or madmen, for believing such doctrines and suc wonderful facts; and for attesting that the same faith and diligence and an experience like their own, are necessary to all men, whateve their rank, in order to their salvation. But apostles and prophets, an the Son of God himself, were exposed to this charge; and none need be moved thereby, when Divine grace has made them wise unto salvation Agrippa saw a great deal of reason for Christianity. His understandin and judgment were for the time convinced, but his heart was no changed. And his conduct and temper were widely different from the humility and spirituality of the gospel. Many are almost persuaded to be religious, who are not quite persuaded; they are under stron convictions of their duty, and of the excellence of the ways of God yet do not pursue their convictions. Paul urged that it was the concer of every one to become a true Christian; that there is grace enough in Christ for all. He expressed his full conviction of the truth of the gospel, the absolute necessity of faith in Christ in order to salvation. Such salvation from such bondage, the gospel of Chris offers to the Gentiles; to a lost world. Yet it is with much difficult that any person can be persuaded he needs a work of grace on his heart like that which was needful for the conversion of the Gentiles. Let u beware of fatal hesitation in our own conduct; and recollect how fa the being almost persuaded to be a Christian, is from being altogethe such a one as every true believer is __________________________________________________________________


    Greek Textus Receptus


    αγριππας
    67 N-NSM δε 1161 CONJ τω 3588 T-DSM φηστω 5347 N-DSM εφη 5346 5713 V-IXI-3S απολελυσθαι 630 5771 V-RPN εδυνατο 1410 5711 V-INI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM ανθρωπος 444 N-NSM ουτος 3778 D-NSM ει 1487 COND μη 3361 PRT-N επεκεκλητο 1941 5716 V-LDI-3S καισαρα 2541 N-ASM

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    26:32 { this man might have been set at
    liberty} (apolelusqai edunato ho anqrwpos houtos). Conclusion of the second class condition (determined as unfulfilled) without an as in #24:19 because of edunato (verb of possibility, Robertson, _Grammar_, p. 1014). Note perfect passive infinitive apolelusqai from apoluw. He certainly "could have been set free." Why was it not done? {If he had not appealed unto Caesar} (ei me epekekleto kaisara). Condition of the second class with the past perfect middle indicative (_op. cit._, p. 1015) of epikalew (cf. #25:11f.). But Paul _only_ appealed to Caesar after Festus had tried to shift him back to Jerusalem and had refused to set him free in Caesarea. Festus comes out with no honor in the case. Since Agrippa was a favorite at court perhaps Festus would be willing to write favorably to Caesar.


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