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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 1 Corinthians 11:5


    CHAPTERS: 1 Corinthians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34

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    King James Bible - 1 Corinthians 11:5

    But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her head uncovered dishonoureth her head: for that is even all one as if she were shaven.

    World English Bible

    But every woman praying or prophesying with her
    head unveiled dishonors her head. For it is one and the same thing as if she were shaved.

    Douay-Rheims - 1 Corinthians 11:5

    But every woman praying or prophesying with her
    head not covered, disgraceth her head: for it is all one as if she were shaven.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her
    head uncovered, dishonoreth her head: for that is even all one as if she were shaved.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    πασα
    3956 A-NSF δε 1161 CONJ γυνη 1135 N-NSF προσευχομενη 4336 5740 V-PNP-NSF η 2228 PRT προφητευουσα 4395 5723 V-PAP-NSF ακατακαλυπτω 177 A-DSF τη 3588 T-DSF κεφαλη 2776 N-DSF καταισχυνει 2617 5719 V-PAI-3S την 3588 T-ASF κεφαλην 2776 N-ASF εαυτης 1438 F-3GSF εν 1520 A-NSN γαρ 1063 CONJ εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S και 2532 CONJ το 3588 T-NSN αυτο 846 P-NSN τη 3588 T-DSF εξυρημενη 3587 5772 V-RPP-DSF

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (5) -
    Lu 2:36 Ac 2:17; 21:9

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 11:5

    Mas toda mujer que ora o profetiza no cubierta su cabeza, afrenta su cabeza; porque lo mismo es que si se hubiese rapado.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 1 Corinthians 11:5

    Verse 5. But every
    woman that prayeth, &c.] Whatever may be the meaning of praying and prophesying, in respect to the man, they have precisely the same meaning in respect to the woman. So that some women at least, as well as some men, might speak to others to edification, and exhortation, and comfort. And this kind of prophesying or teaching was predicted by Joel, Joel ii. 28, and referred to by Peter, Acts ii. 17. And had there not been such gifts bestowed on women, the prophecy could not have had its fulfillment. The only difference marked by the apostle was, the man had his head uncovered, because he was the representative of Christ; the woman had hers covered, because she was placed by the order of God in a state of subjection to the man, and because it was a custom, both among the Greeks and Romans, and among the Jews an express law, that no woman should be seen abroad without a veil. This was, and is, a common custom through all the east, and none but public prostitutes go without veils. And if a woman should appear in public without a veil, she would dishonour her head-her husband. And she must appear like to those women who had their hair shorn off as the punishment of whoredom, or adultery.

    Tacitus informs us, Germ. 19, that, considering the greatness of the population, adulteries were very rare among the Germans; and when any woman was found guilty she was punished in the following way: accisis crinibus, nudatam coram propinquis expellit domo maritus; "having cut off her hair, and stripped her before her relatives, her husband turned her out of doors." And we know that the woman suspected of adultery was ordered by the law of Moses to be stripped of her veil, Num. v. 18.

    Women reduced to a state of servitude, or slavery, had their hair cut off: so we learn from Achilles Tatius. Clitophon says, concerning Leucippe, who was reduced to a state of slavery: pepratai, dedouleuken, ghn eskayen, sesulhtai thv kefalhv to kallov, thn kouran orav? lib. viii. cap. 6, "she was sold for a slave, she dug in the ground, and her hair being shorn off, her head was deprived of its ornament," &c. It was also the custom among the Greeks to cut off their hair in time of mourning. See Euripides in Alcest., ver. 426. Admetus, ordering a common mourning for his wife Alcestis, says: penqov gunaikov thv de koinousqai lego, koura xurhkei kai melampeplw stolh? "I order a general mourning for this woman! let the hair be shorn off, and a black garment put on." Propriety and decency of conduct are the points which the apostle seems to have more especially in view. As a woman who dresses loosely or fantastically, even in the present day, is considered a disgrace to her husband, because suspected to be not very sound in her morals; so in those ancient times, a woman appearing without a veil would be considered in the same light.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 5. But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth , etc.] Not that a woman was allowed to pray publicly in the congregation, and much less to preach or explain the word, for these things were not permitted them: (see 1 Corinthians 14:34,35 1 Timothy 2:12) but it designs any woman that joins in public worship with the minister in prayer, and attends on the hearing of the word preached, or sings the praises of God with the congregation, as we have seen, the word prophesying signifies, with her head uncovered . It may seem strange from whom the Corinthian women should take up this custom, since the Jewish women were not allowed to go into the streets, or into any open and public place, unveiled f211 . It was a Jewish law, that they should go out no where bare headed f212 : yea, it was reckoned scandalous and ignominious to do so. Hence it is said, hl yang arh ywlg , that uncovering of the head is a reproach to the daughters of Israel: and concerning the adulterous woman, it is represented as said by the priest f214 , thou hast separated from the way of the daughters of Israel; for the way or custom of the daughters of Israel is hyar twswkm twyhl , to have their heads covered; but thou hast gone in the ways of the Gentiles, who walk with head bare.

    So that their it should seem that these Corinthians followed the examples of the Heathens: but then, though it might be the custom of some nations for women to go abroad bare headed; yet at their solemnities, where and when they were admitted, for they were not everywhere and always, they used to attend with their heads veiled and covered f215 . Mr. Mede takes notice indeed of some Heathen priestesses, who used to perform their religious rites and sacrifices with open face, and their hair hanging down, and locks spreading, in imitation of whom these women at Corinth are thought to act. However, whoever behaved in this uncomely manner, whose example soever she followed, the apostle says, dishonoureth her head ; not her husband, who is her head in a figurative sense, and is dishonoured by her not being covered; as if she was not subject to him, or because more beautiful than he, and therefore shows herself; but her natural head, as appears from the reason given: for that is even all one as if she were shaven ; to be without a veil, or some sort of covering on her head, according to the custom of the country, is the same thing as if her head was shaved; and everyone knows how dishonourable and scandalous it is for a woman to have her head shaved; and if this is the same, then it is dishonourable and scandalous to her to be without covering in public worship. And this shows, that the natural head of the man is meant in the preceding verse, since the natural head of the woman is meant in this.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 2-16 - Here begin particulars respecting the public assemblies, ch. 1Co 14. I the abundance of spiritual gifts bestowed on the Corinthians, some abuses had crept in; but as Christ did the will, and sought the honou of God, so the Christian should avow his subjection to Christ, doin his will and seeking his glory. We should, even in our dress and habit avoid every thing that may dishonour Christ. The woman was made subjec to man, because made for his help and comfort. And she should d nothing, in Christian assemblies, which looked like a claim of being equal. She ought to have "power," that is, a veil, on her head, becaus of the angels. Their presence should keep Christians from all that is wrong while in the worship of God. Nevertheless, the man and the woma were made for one another. They were to be mutual comforts an blessings, not one a slave, and the other a tyrant. God has so settle matters, both in the kingdom of providence and that of grace, that the authority and subjection of each party should be for mutual help an benefit. It was the common usage of the churches, for women to appea in public assemblies, and join in public worship, veiled; and it wa right that they should do so. The Christian religion sanctions nationa customs wherever these are not against the great principles of trut and holiness; affected singularities receive no countenance from an thing in the Bible.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    πασα
    3956 A-NSF δε 1161 CONJ γυνη 1135 N-NSF προσευχομενη 4336 5740 V-PNP-NSF η 2228 PRT προφητευουσα 4395 5723 V-PAP-NSF ακατακαλυπτω 177 A-DSF τη 3588 T-DSF κεφαλη 2776 N-DSF καταισχυνει 2617 5719 V-PAI-3S την 3588 T-ASF κεφαλην 2776 N-ASF εαυτης 1438 F-3GSF εν 1520 A-NSN γαρ 1063 CONJ εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S και 2532 CONJ το 3588 T-NSN αυτο 846 P-NSN τη 3588 T-DSF εξυρημενη 3587 5772 V-RPP-DSF

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    5. Her
    head uncovered. Rev., unveiled. The Greek women rarely appeared in public, but lived in strict seclusion. Unmarried women never quitted their apartments, except on occasions of festal processions, either as spectators or participants. Even after marriage they were largely confined to the gynaeconitis or women's rooms. Thus Euripides: "As to that which brings the reproach of a bad reputation upon her who remains not at home, giving up the desire of this, I tarried in my dwelling" ("Troades," 649). And Menander: "The door of the court is the boundary fixed for the free woman." The head-dress of Greek women consisted of nets, hair-bags, or kerchiefs, sometimes covering the whole head. A shawl which enveloped the body was also often thrown over the head, especially at marriages or funerals. This costume the Corinthian women had disused in the christian assemblies, perhaps as an assertion of the abolition of sexual distinctions, and the spiritual equality of the woman with the man in the presence of Christ. This custom was discountenanced by Paul as striking at the divinely ordained subjection of the woman to the man. Among the Jews, in ancient times, both married and unmarried women appeared in public unveiled. The later Jewish authorities insisted on the use of the veil.

    All one as if she were shaven. Which would be a sign either of grief or of disgrace. The cutting off of the hair is used by Isaiah as a figure of the entire destruction of a people by divine retribution. Isa. vii. 20 Among the Jews a woman convicted of adultery had her hair shorn, with the formula: "Because thou hast departed from the manner of the daughters of Israel, who go with their head covered, therefore that has befallen thee which thou hast chosen." According to Tacitus, among the Germans an adulteress was driven from her husband's house with her head shaved; and the Justinian code prescribed this penalty for an adulteress, whom, at the expiration of two years, her husband refused to receive again. Paul means that a woman praying or prophesying uncovered puts herself in public opinion on a level with a courtesan.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    11:5 {With her head unveiled} (akatakaluptwi tei kefalei). Associative instrumental case of manner and the predicative adjective (compound adjective and feminine form same as masculine), "with the head unveiled." Probably some of the women had violated this custom. "Amongst Greeks only the hetairai, so numerous in Corinth, went about unveiled; slave-women wore the shaven head--also a punishment of the adulteress" (Findlay). Cf. #Nu 5:18. {One and the same thing as if she were shaven} (hen kai to auto tei exuremenei). Literally, "One and the same thing with the one shaven" (associative instrumental case again, Robertson, _Grammar_, p. 530). Perfect passive articular participle of the verb xuraw, later form for the old xurew. It is public praying and prophesying that the Apostle here has in mind. He does not here condemn the act, but the breach of custom which would bring reproach. A woman convicted of adultery had her hair shorn (#Isa 7:20). The Justinian code prescribed shaving the head for an adulteress whom the husband refused to receive after two years. Paul does not tell Corinthian Christian women to put themselves on a level with courtesans.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34

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