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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 1 Corinthians 11:4


    CHAPTERS: 1 Corinthians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34

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    King James Bible - 1 Corinthians 11:4

    Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head.

    World English Bible

    Every man praying or prophesying, having his
    head covered, dishonors his head.

    Douay-Rheims - 1 Corinthians 11:4

    Every man praying or prophesying with his
    head covered, disgraceth his head.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Every man praying or prophesying, having his
    head covered, dishonoreth his head.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    πας
    3956 A-NSM ανηρ 435 N-NSM προσευχομενος 4336 5740 V-PNP-NSM η 2228 PRT προφητευων 4395 5723 V-PAP-NSM κατα 2596 PREP κεφαλης 2776 N-GSF εχων 2192 5723 V-PAP-NSM καταισχυνει 2617 5719 V-PAI-3S την 3588 T-ASF κεφαλην 2776 N-ASF αυτου 846 P-GSM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (4) -
    1Co 12:10,28; 14:1 *etc:

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 11:4

    Todo varn que ora o profetiza cubierta la cabeza, afrenta su cabeza.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 1 Corinthians 11:4

    Verse 4. Praying, or prophesying] Any person who engages in
    public acts in the worship of God, whether prayer, singing, or exhortation: for we learn, from the apostle himself, that profhteuein, to prophesy, signifies to speak unto men to edification, exhortation, and comfort, chap. xiv. 3. And this comprehends all that we understand by exhortation, or even preaching.

    Having his head covered] With his cap or turban on, dishonoureth his head; because the head being covered was a sign of subjection; and while he was employed in the public ministration of the word, he was to be considered as a representative of Christ, and on this account his being veiled or covered would be improper. This decision of the apostle was in point blank hostility to the canons of the Jews; for they would not suffer a man to pray unless he was veiled, for which they gave this reason. "He should veil himself to show that he is ashamed before God, and unworthy with open face to behold him." See much in Lightfoot on this point.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 4. Every man praying or prophesying , etc.] This is to be understood of praying and prophesying in public, and not in private; and not to be restrained to the person that is the mouth of the congregation to God in prayer, or who preaches to the people in the name of God; but to be applied to every individual person that attends public worship, that joins in prayer with the minister, and hears the word preached by him, which is meant by prophesying; for not foretelling future events is here meant, but explaining the word of God, the prophecies of the Old Testament, or any part of Scripture, unless singing of psalms should rather be designed, since that is sometimes expressed by prophesying: so in ( 1 Samuel 10:5) thou shalt meet a company of prophets coming down from the high place, with a psaltery, and a tabret, and a pipe, and a harp before them, and they shall prophesy. The Targum renders it thus, yjbm wnaw , and they shall sing praise; upon which Kimchi observes, that it is as if it was said, their prophecy shall be twry , songs and praises to God, spoken by the Holy Ghost. So in ( 1 Samuel 19:23,24) it is said of Saul, that he went on and prophesied. The Targum is, he went on, jbmw , and praised.

    And again, he stripped off his clothes also, and prophesied. Targum, jbw , and praised, or sung praise. Once more, in ( 1 Chronicles 25:1-3) it is said of Asaph, and others, that they should prophesy with harps, with psalteries, and with cymbals; which Kimchi explains of Asaphs singing vocally, and of his sons playing upon musical instruments. Having his head covered ; which, it seems, was the custom of some of them so to do in attendance on public worship: this they either did in imitation of the Heathens f208 , who worshipped their deities with their heads covered, excepting Saturn and Hercules, whose solemnities were celebrated with heads unveiled, contrary to the prevailing customs and usages in the worship of others; or rather in imitation of the Jews, who used to veil themselves in public worship, through a spirit of bondage unto fear, under which they were, and do to this day; and with whom it is a rule f209 , that a man might not stand and pray, neither with his girdle on, hlwgm arb alw , nor with his head uncovered; nor with his feet uncovered.

    Accordingly it is said of Nicodemus ben Gorion, that he went into the school grieved, and Pj[tn , veiled himself, and stood in prayer; and a little after that that he went into the sanctuary and veiled himself, and stood and prayed; though the Targum on ( Judges 5:2) suggests, that the wise men sit in the synagogues, ylg yrb , with the head uncovered, to teach the people the words of the law; and on ( Judges 5:9) has these words, Deborah in prophecy said, I am sent to praise the Scribes of Israel, who when they were in tribulation did not cease from expounding the law; and so it was beautiful for them to sit in the synagogues, with the head uncovered, and teach the people the words of the law, and bless and confess before the Lord; but it seems that a different custom had now prevailed; now from this Gentile or judaizing practice, the apostle would dissuade them by observing, that such an one that uses it, dishonoureth his head; meaning either in a figurative, spiritual, and mystical sense, his head Christ, in token of the liberty received from him, and because he is above in heaven, and clear of all sin, the head must be uncovered in public worship; or otherwise the reverse is suggested of him, which is highly to dishonour him, and is the sense many interpreters give into: rather the reason should be, because Christ, the believers head, appears for him in heaven, opens a way of access for him, gives him audience and acceptance in his person, and through his blood and righteousness; and therefore should appear with open face and head uncovered, as a token of freedom and boldness; otherwise he dishonours his head as if his blood and sacrifice were not effectual, and his intercession not prevalent: but the natural head, taken in a literal sense, is rather meant; and the sense is, that by covering it, it looks as if he was guilty and ashamed, and in subjection; whereas to appear uncovered expresses freedom, boldness, and superiority, like himself, who is the head of the woman; whereas to be covered, as with a womans veil or hood, is effeminate, unmanly, and dishonourable.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 2-16 - Here begin particulars respecting the public assemblies, ch. 1Co 14. I the abundance of spiritual gifts bestowed on the Corinthians, some abuses had crept in; but as Christ did the will, and sought the honou of God, so the Christian should avow his subjection to Christ, doin his will and seeking his glory. We should, even in our dress and habit avoid every thing that may dishonour Christ. The woman was made subjec to man, because made for his help and comfort. And she should d nothing, in Christian assemblies, which looked like a claim of being equal. She ought to have "power," that is, a veil, on her head, becaus of the angels. Their presence should keep Christians from all that is wrong while in the worship of God. Nevertheless, the man and the woma were made for one another. They were to be mutual comforts an blessings, not one a slave, and the other a tyrant. God has so settle matters, both in the kingdom of providence and that of grace, that the authority and subjection of each party should be for mutual help an benefit. It was the common usage of the churches, for women to appea in public assemblies, and join in public worship, veiled; and it wa right that they should do so. The Christian religion sanctions nationa customs wherever these are not against the great principles of trut and holiness; affected singularities receive no countenance from an thing in the Bible.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    πας
    3956 A-NSM ανηρ 435 N-NSM προσευχομενος 4336 5740 V-PNP-NSM η 2228 PRT προφητευων 4395 5723 V-PAP-NSM κατα 2596 PREP κεφαλης 2776 N-GSF εχων 2192 5723 V-PAP-NSM καταισχυνει 2617 5719 V-PAI-3S την 3588 T-ASF κεφαλην 2776 N-ASF αυτου 846 P-GSM

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    4. Having his
    head covered (kata kefalhv ecwn). Lit., having something hanging down from his head. Referring to the tallith, a four-cornered shawl having fringes consisting of eight threads, each knotted five times, and worn over the head in prayer. It was placed upon the worshipper's head at his entrance into the synagogue. The Romans, like the Jews, prayed with the head veiled. So Aeneas: "And our heads are shrouded before the altar with a Phrygian vestment" (Virgil, "Aeneid," iii., 545). The Greeks remained bareheaded during prayer or sacrifice, as indeed they did in their ordinary outdoor life. The Grecian usage, which had become prevalent in the Grecian churches, seems to have commended itself to Paul as more becoming the superior position of the man.

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    11:4 {Having his
    head covered} (kata kefales ecwn). Literally, having a veil (kalumma understood) down from the head (kefales ablative after kata as with kata in #Mr 5:13; Ac 27:14). It is not certain whether the Jews at this time used the _tallith_, "a four-corned shawl having fringes consisting of eight threads, each knotted five times" (Vincent) as they did later. Virgil (_Aeneid_ iii., 545) says: "And our heads are shrouded before the altar with a Phrygian vestment." The Greeks (both men and women) remained bareheaded in public prayer and this usage Paul commends for the men.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34

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