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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Jeremiah 5:4


    CHAPTERS: Jeremiah 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB

    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Jeremiah 5:4

    και 2532 εγω 1473 ειπα 2036 5656 ισως 2481 πτωχοι 4434 εισιν 1526 5748 διοτι 1360 ουκ 3756 εδυνασθησαν οτι 3754 ουκ 3756 εγνωσαν 1097 5627 οδον 3598 κυριου 2962 και 2532 κρισιν 2920 θεου 2316

    Douay Rheims Bible

    But I said: Perhaps these are poor and foolish, that know not the way of the Lord, the judgement of their God.

    King James Bible - Jeremiah 5:4

    Therefore I said, Surely these are poor; they are foolish: for they know not the way of the LORD, nor the judgment of their God.

    World English Bible

    Then I said, "Surely these are poor. They are foolish; for they don't know the way of Yahweh, nor the
    law of their God.

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Jeremiah 5:4

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 12
    Deut. xiii. 1.

    But also in another section,8238

    8238 Of course our division of the Scripture by chapter and verse did not exist in the days of Tertullian.—Tr.

    “If, however, thy brother, the son of thy father or of thy mother, or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend who is as thine own soul, solicit thee, saying secretly, Let us go and serve other gods, which thou knowest not, nor did thy fathers, of the gods of the nations which are round about thee, very nigh unto thee or far off from thee, do not consent to go with him, and do not hearken to him. Thine eye shall not spare him, neither shalt thou pity, neither shalt thou preserve him; thou shalt certainly inform upon him.  Thine hand shall be first upon him to kill him, and afterwards the hand of thy people; and ye shall stone him, and he shall die, seeing he has sought to turn thee away from the Lord thy God.”8239

    8239


    Anf-01 v.vi.iii Pg 8
    Deut. xiii. 6; 18.

    You ought therefore to “hate those that hate God, and to waste away [with grief] on account of His enemies.”899

    899


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 51
    Isa. iii. 12.

    In another passage He forbids all implicit trust in man, and likewise in the applause of man; as by the prophet Jeremiah: “Cursed be the man that trusteth in man.”4031

    4031


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 12
    Deut. xiii. 1.

    But also in another section,8238

    8238 Of course our division of the Scripture by chapter and verse did not exist in the days of Tertullian.—Tr.

    “If, however, thy brother, the son of thy father or of thy mother, or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend who is as thine own soul, solicit thee, saying secretly, Let us go and serve other gods, which thou knowest not, nor did thy fathers, of the gods of the nations which are round about thee, very nigh unto thee or far off from thee, do not consent to go with him, and do not hearken to him. Thine eye shall not spare him, neither shalt thou pity, neither shalt thou preserve him; thou shalt certainly inform upon him.  Thine hand shall be first upon him to kill him, and afterwards the hand of thy people; and ye shall stone him, and he shall die, seeing he has sought to turn thee away from the Lord thy God.”8239

    8239


    Anf-01 v.vi.iii Pg 8
    Deut. xiii. 6; 18.

    You ought therefore to “hate those that hate God, and to waste away [with grief] on account of His enemies.”899

    899


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 51
    Isa. iii. 12.

    In another passage He forbids all implicit trust in man, and likewise in the applause of man; as by the prophet Jeremiah: “Cursed be the man that trusteth in man.”4031

    4031


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 27
    Oehler refers to Isa. xix. 1. See, too, Isa. xxx. and xxxi.

    So, again, Babylon, in our own John, is a figure of the city Rome, as being equally great and proud of her sway, and triumphant over the saints.1273

    1273


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.vi Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.iii Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.vi Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.iii Pg 5.1


    Anf-01 viii.ii.lxiii Pg 2
    Isa. i. 3.

    And Jesus the Christ, because the Jews knew not what the Father was, and what the Son, in like manner accused them; and Himself said, “No one knoweth the Father, but the Son; nor the Son, but the Father, and they to whom the Son revealeth Him.”1899

    1899


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xx Pg 2
    Isa. i. 3.

    they pervert his words to mean ignorance of the invisible Bythus. And that which is spoken by Hosea, “There is no truth in them, nor the knowledge of God,”2907

    2907


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xxxvii Pg 2
    Isa. i. 3. This quotation varies only in one word from that of the LXX.

    And again elsewhere, when the same prophet speaks in like manner from the person of the Father, “What is the house that ye will build for Me? saith the Lord. The heaven is My throne, and the earth is My footstool.”1842

    1842


    Anf-01 viii.ii.lxiii Pg 6
    Isa. i. 3.

    And again, Jesus, as we have already shown, while He was with them, said, “No one knoweth the Father, but the Son; nor the Son but the Father, and those to whom the Son will reveal Him.”1903

    1903


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.x Pg 6.1
    1580


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 36.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.viii Pg 32.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.vi Pg 14
    Isa. i. 2, 3.

    We indeed, who know for certain that Christ always spoke in the prophets, as the Spirit of the Creator (for so says the prophet: “The person of our Spirit, Christ the Lord,”3169

    3169 This seems to be a translation with a slight alteration of the LXX. version of Lam. iv. 20, πνεῦμα προσώπου ἡμῶν Χριστὸς Κύριος .

    who from the beginning was both heard and seen as the Father’s vicegerent in the name of God), are well aware that His words, when actually upbraiding Israel, were the same as those which it was foretold that He should denounce against him: “Ye have forsaken the Lord, and have provoked the Holy One of Israel to anger.”3170

    3170


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 38
    Isa. i. 3.

    nor to the Gentiles: “For, behold,” says He, “of the nations I have no man.”4501

    4501


    Anf-03 vi.vii.iv Pg 11
    Obsequii. For the sentiment, compare Isa. i. 3.

    Finally, (the creatures) which obey, acknowledge their masters. Do we hesitate to listen diligently to Him to whom alone we are subjected—that is, the Lord?  But how unjust is it, how ungrateful likewise, not to repay from yourself the same which, through the indulgence of your neighbour, you obtain from others, to him through whom you obtain it!  Nor needs there more words on the exhibition of obedience9040

    9040 Obsequii.

    due from us to the Lord God; for the acknowledgment9041

    9041 See above, “the creatures…acknowledge their masters.”

    of God understands what is incumbent on it.  Lest, however, we seem to have inserted remarks on obedience9042

    9042 Obsequio.

    as something irrelevant, (let us remember) that obedience9043

    9043 Obsequio.

    itself is drawn from patience. Never does an impatient man render it, or a patient fail to find pleasure9044

    9044 “Oblectatur” Oehler reads with the mss.  The editors, as he says, have emended “Obluctatur,” which Mr. Dodgson reads.

    in it. Who, then, could treat largely (enough) of the good of that patience which the Lord God, the Demonstrator and Acceptor of all good things, carried about in His own self?9045

    9045 See the previous chapter.

    To whom, again, would it be doubtful that every good thing ought, because it pertains9046

    9046 See the previous chapter.

    to God, to be earnestly pursued with the whole mind by such as pertain to God? By means of which (considerations) both commendation and exhortation9047

    9047 See chap. i.

    on the subject of patience are briefly, and as it were in the compendium of a prescriptive rule, established.9048

    9048 [All our author’s instances of this principle of the Præscriptio are noteworthy, as interpreting its use in the Advs. Hæreses.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 27
    Isa. i. 3.

    and as to their preferring the establishment of their own righteousness, (the Creator again describes them as) “teaching for doctrines the commandments of men;”5862

    5862


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 3, 4.

    So likewise that conditional threat of the sword, “If ye refuse and hear me not, the sword shall devour you,”3423

    3423


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 36
    Isa. lvii. i.

    When does this more frequently happen than in the persecution of His saints? This, indeed, is no ordinary matter,4291

    4291 We have, by understanding res, treated these adjectives as nouns. Rigalt. applies them to the doctrina of the sentence just previous. Perhaps, however, “persecutione” is the noun.

    no common casualty of the law of nature; but it is that illustrious devotion, that fighting for the faith, wherein whosoever loses his life for God saves it, so that you may here again recognize the Judge who recompenses the evil gain of life with its destruction, and the good loss thereof with its salvation. It is, however, a jealous God whom He here presents to me; one who returns evil for evil.  “For whosoever,” says He, “shall be ashamed of me, of him will I also be ashamed.”4292

    4292


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 5

    VERSE 	(4) - 

    Jer 4:22; 7:8; 8:7 Isa 27:11; 28:9-13 Ho 4:6 Mt 11:5 Joh 7:48,49


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET