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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - John 2:4


    CHAPTERS: John 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21     

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - John 2:4

    λεγει 3004 5719 αυτη 846 ο 3588 ιησους 2424 τι 5101 εμοι 1698 και 2532 σοι 4671 γυναι 1135 ουπω 3768 ηκει 2240 5719 η 3588 ωρα 5610 μου 3450

    Douay Rheims Bible

    And Jesus saith to her: Woman, what is that to me and to thee? my
    hour is not yet come.

    King James Bible - John 2:4

    Jesus saith unto her, Woman, what have I to do with thee? mine
    hour is not yet come.

    World English Bible

    Jesus said to her, "Woman, what does that have to do with you and me? My
    hour has not yet come."

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-01 ix.iv.xvii Pg 39, Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlv Pg 21, Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlv Pg 24, Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlv Pg 24, Anf-05 iii.iii.v.xvi Pg 6, Anf-09 iv.iii.v Pg 38, Npnf-101 iv.5 Pg 22, Npnf-103 iv.iv.v Pg 29, Npnf-103 iv.iv.v Pg 29, Npnf-106 iv Pg 21, Npnf-107 iii.cxx Pg 4, Npnf-107 iii.ix Pg 2, Npnf-109 iii.xiii Pg 22, Npnf-113 iv.iv.xii Pg 54, Npnf-114 iv.xxiii Pg 25, Npnf-114 iv.xxiv Pg 2, Npnf-114 iv.lxxxvii Pg 26, Npnf-114 iv.xxiv Pg 0, Npnf-114 v.xxiii Pg 25, Npnf-114 v.xxiv Pg 2, Npnf-114 v.lxxxvii Pg 26, Npnf-114 v.xxiv Pg 0, Npnf-202 ii.vi.viii Pg 27, Npnf-203 iv.ix.iii Pg 404, Npnf-204 xix.ii.xiii Pg 7, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.iv.v Pg 46, Npnf-205 xii.ii Pg 29, Npnf-210 iv.iv.vi.iv Pg 17, Npnf-213 ii.vi.xi Pg 10

    World Wide Bible Resources


    John 2:4

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 ix.iv.xvii Pg 39
    John ii. 4.

    — waiting for that hour which was foreknown by the Father. This is also the reason why, when men were often desirous to take Him, it is said, “No man laid hands upon Him, for the hour of His being taken was not yet come;”3601

    3601


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlv Pg 21
    The interpretation of Tertullian, however, has the all-important merit (which Bacon and Hooker recognize as cardinal) of flowing from the Scripture without squeezing. (1.) Our Lord sent the message to John as a personal and tender assurance to him. (2.) The story illustrates the decrease of which the Baptist had spoken prophetically (John iii. 30.); and (3.) it sustains the great principle that Christ alone is without sin, this being the one fault recorded of the Baptist, otherwise a singular instance of sinlessness. The B. Virgin’s fault (gently reproved by the Lord, John ii. 4.), seems in like manner introduced on this principle of exhibiting the only sinless One, in His Divine perfections as without spot. So even Joseph and Moses (Psalm cvi. 33., and Gen. xlvii. 20.) are shewn “to be but men.” The policy of Joseph has indeed been extravagantly censured.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlv Pg 24
    Tertullian seems with reflect the early view of the church as to our Lord’s total abnegation of all filial relations with the Virgin, when He gave to her St. John, instead of Himself, on the Cross. For this purpose He had made him the beloved disciple and doubtless charged him with all the duties with which he was to be clothed.  Thus He fulfilled the figurative law of His priesthood, as given by Moses, (Deut. xxxiii. 9.) and crucified himself, from the beginning, according to his own Law (Luke xiv. 26–27.) which he identifies with the Cross, here and also in Matt. x. 37–38. These then are the steps of His own holy example, illustrating His own precept, for doubtless, as “the Son of man,” His filial love was superlative and made the sacrifice the sharper: (1.) He taught Joseph that He had no earthly father, when he said—“Wist ye not that I must be in my Father’s house,” (Luke iii. 49., Revised); but, having established this fact, he then became “subject” to both his parents, till His public ministry began. (2.) At this time, He seems to have admonished His mother, that He could not recognize her authority any longer, (John ii. 4.) having now entered upon His work as the Son of God. (3.) Accordingly, He refused, thenceforth, to know her save only as one of His redeemed, excepting her in nothing from this common work for all the Human Race, (Matt. xii. 48) in the passage which Tertullian so forcibly expounds. (4.) Finally, when St. Mary draws near to the cross, apparently to claim the final recognition of the previous understanding (John ii. 4.) to which the Lord had referred her at Cana—He fulfils His last duty to her in giving her a son instead of Himself, and thereafter (5) recognizes her no more; not even in His messages after the Resurrection, nor when He met her with other disciples. He rewards her, instead, with the infinite love He bears to all His saints, and with the brightest rewards which are bestowed upon Faith. In this consists her superlative excellence and her conspicuous glory among the Redeemed (Luke i. 47–48.) in Christ’s account.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlv Pg 24
    Tertullian seems with reflect the early view of the church as to our Lord’s total abnegation of all filial relations with the Virgin, when He gave to her St. John, instead of Himself, on the Cross. For this purpose He had made him the beloved disciple and doubtless charged him with all the duties with which he was to be clothed.  Thus He fulfilled the figurative law of His priesthood, as given by Moses, (Deut. xxxiii. 9.) and crucified himself, from the beginning, according to his own Law (Luke xiv. 26–27.) which he identifies with the Cross, here and also in Matt. x. 37–38. These then are the steps of His own holy example, illustrating His own precept, for doubtless, as “the Son of man,” His filial love was superlative and made the sacrifice the sharper: (1.) He taught Joseph that He had no earthly father, when he said—“Wist ye not that I must be in my Father’s house,” (Luke iii. 49., Revised); but, having established this fact, he then became “subject” to both his parents, till His public ministry began. (2.) At this time, He seems to have admonished His mother, that He could not recognize her authority any longer, (John ii. 4.) having now entered upon His work as the Son of God. (3.) Accordingly, He refused, thenceforth, to know her save only as one of His redeemed, excepting her in nothing from this common work for all the Human Race, (Matt. xii. 48) in the passage which Tertullian so forcibly expounds. (4.) Finally, when St. Mary draws near to the cross, apparently to claim the final recognition of the previous understanding (John ii. 4.) to which the Lord had referred her at Cana—He fulfils His last duty to her in giving her a son instead of Himself, and thereafter (5) recognizes her no more; not even in His messages after the Resurrection, nor when He met her with other disciples. He rewards her, instead, with the infinite love He bears to all His saints, and with the brightest rewards which are bestowed upon Faith. In this consists her superlative excellence and her conspicuous glory among the Redeemed (Luke i. 47–48.) in Christ’s account.


    Edersheim Bible History

    Lifetimes viii.vi Pg 9.1, Lifetimes viii.xxx Pg 35.2


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 2

    VERSE 	(4) - 

    Joh 19:26,27; 20:13,15 Mt 15:28


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