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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Matthew 16:27


    CHAPTERS: Matthew 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Matthew 16:27

    μελλει 3195 5719 γαρ 1063 ο 3588 υιος 5207 του 3588 ανθρωπου 444 ερχεσθαι 2064 5738 εν 1722 τη 3588 δοξη 1391 του 3588 πατρος 3962 αυτου 846 μετα 3326 των 3588 αγγελων 32 αυτου 846 και 2532 τοτε 5119 αποδωσει 591 5692 εκαστω 1538 κατα 2596 την 3588 πραξιν 4234 αυτου 846

    Douay Rheims Bible

    For the Son of man shall come in the glory of his Father with his angels: and then will he render to every man according to his works.

    King James Bible - Matthew 16:27

    For the Son of man shall come in the glory of his Father with his angels; and then he shall reward every man according to his works.

    World English Bible

    For the Son of Man will come in the glory of his Father with his angels, and then he will render to everyone according to his deeds.

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-06 iii.iv.iii.vi Pg 7, Anf-07 ix.viii.ii Pg 53, Anf-08 viii.iii.ii.ii Pg 12, Anf-09 iv.iii.xxiii Pg 80, Anf-09 xvi.ii.v.xxix Pg 3, Anf-09 xvi.ii.v.xxx Pg 5, Npnf-101 vi.IV.III Pg 6, Npnf-105 xix.iv.iv Pg 30, Npnf-105 xix.iv.xix Pg 3, Npnf-105 xix.iv.xx Pg 8, Npnf-105 xix.iv.xlv Pg 12, Npnf-106 vi.v.lvi Pg 3, Npnf-106 vi.v.xiii Pg 10, Npnf-107 iii.xlv Pg 25, Npnf-108 ii.VII Pg 67, Npnf-109 x.v Pg 17, Npnf-110 iii.LIV Pg 8, Npnf-111 vi.ii Pg 5, Npnf-208 vi.ii.ii Pg 207, Npnf-208 vii.vii Pg 34, Npnf-209 ii.v.ii.x Pg 80

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Matthew 16:27

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 105.1


    Npnf-201 iii.vii.xxiv Pg 35


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xiii Pg 11
    Matt. x. 33; Mark viii. 38; Luke ix. 26; 2 Tim. ii. 12.



    Anf-03 v.vii.v Pg 11
    Matt. x. 33, Mark viii. 38, and Luke ix. 26.

    Other matters for shame find I none which can prove me to be shameless in a good sense, and foolish in a happy one, by my own contempt of shame. The Son of God was crucified; I am not ashamed because men must needs be ashamed of it.  And the Son of God died; it is by all means to be believed, because it is absurd.7010

    7010 Ineptum.

    And He was buried, and rose again; the fact is certain, because it is impossible.  But how will all this be true in Him, if He was not Himself true—if He really had not in Himself that which might be crucified, might die, might be buried, and might rise again? I mean this flesh suffused with blood, built up with bones, interwoven with nerves, entwined with veins, a flesh which knew how to be born, and how to die, human without doubt, as born of a human being. It will therefore be mortal in Christ, because Christ is man and the Son of man.  Else why is Christ man and the Son of man, if he has nothing of man, and nothing from man? Unless it be either that man is anything else than flesh, or man’s flesh comes from any other source than man, or Mary is anything else than a human being, or Marcion’s man is as Marcion’s god.7011

    7011 That is, imaginary and unreal.

    Otherwise Christ could not be described as being man without flesh, nor the Son of man without any human parent; just as He is not God without the Spirit of God, nor the Son of God without having God for His father. Thus the nature7012

    7012 Census: “the origin.”

    of the two substances displayed Him as man and God,—in one respect born, in the other unborn; in one respect fleshly, in the other spiritual; in one sense weak, in the other exceeding strong; in one sense dying, in the other living. This property of the two states—the divine and the human—is distinctly asserted7013

    7013 Dispuncta est.

    with equal truth of both natures alike, with the same belief both in respect of the Spirit7014

    7014 This term is almost a technical designation of the divine nature of Christ in Tertullian. (See our translation of the Anti-Marcion, p. 247, note 7, Edin.)

    and of the flesh. The powers of the Spirit,7015

    7015 This term is almost a technical designation of the divine nature of Christ in Tertullian. (See our translation of the Anti-Marcion, p. 247, note 7, Edin.)

    proved Him to be God, His sufferings attested the flesh of man. If His powers were not without the Spirit7016

    7016 This term is almost a technical designation of the divine nature of Christ in Tertullian. (See our translation of the Anti-Marcion, p. 247, note 7, Edin.)

    in like manner, were not His sufferings without the flesh. If His flesh with its sufferings was fictitious, for the same reason was the Spirit false with all its powers. Wherefore halve7017

    7017 Dimidias.

    Christ with a lie? He was wholly the truth. Believe me, He chose rather to be born, than in any part to pretend—and that indeed to His own detriment—that He was bearing about a flesh hardened without bones, solid without muscles, bloody without blood, clothed without the tunic of skin,7018

    7018 See his Adv. Valentin, chap. 25.

    hungry without appetite, eating without teeth, speaking without a tongue, so that His word was a phantom to the ears through an imaginary voice. A phantom, too, it was of course after the resurrection, when, showing His hands and His feet for the disciples to examine, He said, “Behold and see that it is I myself, for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have;”7019

    7019


    Npnf-201 iii.vii.xxiv Pg 35


    Npnf-201 iii.vii.xxiv Pg 35


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xiii Pg 11
    Matt. x. 33; Mark viii. 38; Luke ix. 26; 2 Tim. ii. 12.



    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 38
    Luke ix. 26.

    Now to none but my Christ can be assigned the occasion4293

    4293 Materia conveniat.

    of such a shame as this. His whole course4294

    4294 Ordo.

    was so exposed to shame as to open a way for even the taunts of heretics, declaiming4295

    4295 Perorantibus.

    with all the bitterness in their power against the utter disgrace4296

    4296 Fœditatem.

    of His birth and bringing-up, and the unworthiness of His very flesh.4297

    4297 Ipsius etiam carnis indignitatem; because His flesh, being capable of suffering and subject to death, seemed to them unworthy of God. So Adv. Judæos, chap. xiv., he says: “Primo sordidis indutus est, id est carnis passibilis et mortalis indignitate.” Or His “indignity” may have been εἶδος οὐκ ἄξιον τυραννίδος, His “unkingly aspect” (as Origen expresses it, Contra Celsum, 6); His “form of a servant,” or slave, as St. Paul says. See also Tertullian’s De Patientia, iii. (Rigalt.)

    But how can that Christ of yours be liable to a shame, which it is impossible for him to experience? Since he was never condensed4298

    4298


    Anf-03 v.vii.v Pg 11
    Matt. x. 33, Mark viii. 38, and Luke ix. 26.

    Other matters for shame find I none which can prove me to be shameless in a good sense, and foolish in a happy one, by my own contempt of shame. The Son of God was crucified; I am not ashamed because men must needs be ashamed of it.  And the Son of God died; it is by all means to be believed, because it is absurd.7010

    7010 Ineptum.

    And He was buried, and rose again; the fact is certain, because it is impossible.  But how will all this be true in Him, if He was not Himself true—if He really had not in Himself that which might be crucified, might die, might be buried, and might rise again? I mean this flesh suffused with blood, built up with bones, interwoven with nerves, entwined with veins, a flesh which knew how to be born, and how to die, human without doubt, as born of a human being. It will therefore be mortal in Christ, because Christ is man and the Son of man.  Else why is Christ man and the Son of man, if he has nothing of man, and nothing from man? Unless it be either that man is anything else than flesh, or man’s flesh comes from any other source than man, or Mary is anything else than a human being, or Marcion’s man is as Marcion’s god.7011

    7011 That is, imaginary and unreal.

    Otherwise Christ could not be described as being man without flesh, nor the Son of man without any human parent; just as He is not God without the Spirit of God, nor the Son of God without having God for His father. Thus the nature7012

    7012 Census: “the origin.”

    of the two substances displayed Him as man and God,—in one respect born, in the other unborn; in one respect fleshly, in the other spiritual; in one sense weak, in the other exceeding strong; in one sense dying, in the other living. This property of the two states—the divine and the human—is distinctly asserted7013

    7013 Dispuncta est.

    with equal truth of both natures alike, with the same belief both in respect of the Spirit7014

    7014 This term is almost a technical designation of the divine nature of Christ in Tertullian. (See our translation of the Anti-Marcion, p. 247, note 7, Edin.)

    and of the flesh. The powers of the Spirit,7015

    7015 This term is almost a technical designation of the divine nature of Christ in Tertullian. (See our translation of the Anti-Marcion, p. 247, note 7, Edin.)

    proved Him to be God, His sufferings attested the flesh of man. If His powers were not without the Spirit7016

    7016 This term is almost a technical designation of the divine nature of Christ in Tertullian. (See our translation of the Anti-Marcion, p. 247, note 7, Edin.)

    in like manner, were not His sufferings without the flesh. If His flesh with its sufferings was fictitious, for the same reason was the Spirit false with all its powers. Wherefore halve7017

    7017 Dimidias.

    Christ with a lie? He was wholly the truth. Believe me, He chose rather to be born, than in any part to pretend—and that indeed to His own detriment—that He was bearing about a flesh hardened without bones, solid without muscles, bloody without blood, clothed without the tunic of skin,7018

    7018 See his Adv. Valentin, chap. 25.

    hungry without appetite, eating without teeth, speaking without a tongue, so that His word was a phantom to the ears through an imaginary voice. A phantom, too, it was of course after the resurrection, when, showing His hands and His feet for the disciples to examine, He said, “Behold and see that it is I myself, for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have;”7019

    7019


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxix Pg 35
    Luke xxi. 27, 28.

    “So likewise ye, when ye shall see these things come to pass, know ye that the kingdom of God is nigh at hand.”5047

    5047


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xli Pg 18
    Luke xxii. 69.

    For it was on the authority of the prophecy of Daniel that He intimated to them that He was “the Son of man,”5110

    5110


    Edersheim Bible History

    Lifetimes viii.xxxvii Pg 82.1


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 16

    VERSE 	(27) - 

    Mt 24:30; 25:31; 26:64 Mr 8:38; 14:62 Lu 9:26; 21:27; 22:69


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