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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 1 Corinthians 14:11


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    King James Bible - 1 Corinthians 14:11

    Therefore if I know not the meaning of the voice, I shall be unto him that speaketh a barbarian, and he that speaketh shall be a barbarian unto me.

    World English Bible

    If then I don't know the meaning of the
    sound, I would be to him who speaks a foreigner, and he who speaks would be a foreigner to me.

    Douay-Rheims - 1 Corinthians 14:11

    If then I know not the
    power of the voice, I shall be to him to whom I speak a barbarian; and he that speaketh, a barbarian to me.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Therefore, if I know not the meaning of the
    voice, I shall be to him that speaketh a barbarian, and he that speaketh will be a barbarian to me.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    εαν
    1437 COND ουν 3767 CONJ μη 3361 PRT-N ειδω 1492 5762 V-RAS-1S την 3588 T-ASF δυναμιν 1411 N-ASF της 3588 T-GSF φωνης 5456 N-GSF εσομαι 2071 5704 V-FXI-1S τω 3588 T-DSM λαλουντι 2980 5723 V-PAP-DSM βαρβαρος 915 A-NSM και 2532 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM λαλων 2980 5723 V-PAP-NSM εν 1722 PREP εμοι 1698 P-1DS βαρβαρος 915 A-NSM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (11) -
    :21 Ac 28:2,4 Ro 1:14 Col 3:11

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 14:11

    mas si yo ignorare la virtud de la voz, ser brbaro al que habla, y el que habla ser brbaro para mí.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 1 Corinthians 14:11

    Verse 11. If I know not the meaning of the
    voice] thn dunamiv thv fwnhv, The power and signification of the language.

    I shall be unto him that speaketh a barbarian] I shall appear to him, and he to me, as a person who had no distinct and articulate sounds which can convey any kind of meaning. This observation is very natural: when we hear persons speaking in a language of which we know nothing, we wonder how they can understand each other, as, in their speech, there appears to us no regular distinction of sounds or words. For the meaning and origin of the word barbarian, see the note on Acts xxviii. 2.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 11. Therefore if I know not the meaning of the voice , etc.] The force and power of a language, the signification of it, the ideas its words convey, but only hear the sound of it: I shall be to him that speaketh a barbarian, and he that speaketh shall be a barbarian unto me : like one of those rude and uncultivated people that inhabit deserts and wild places, who can neither understand the language of others, nor be understood by others; and indeed may be meant of any sort of people, that do not understand one anothers language: the word rb , bar, and arb , bara, in the Chaldee, Syriac, and Arabic languages, not only signifies a field, a wood, or desert place, but also without, or any thing extraneous; and being doubled, signifies one that lives without, in another land; a stranger, and that speaks a strange language; so all other nations of the world were barbarians to the Hebrews, and particularly the Egyptians; see the Targum on ( <19B401> Psalm 114:1) and so were all other nations to the Greeks, (see Romans 1:14) and also to the Romans: and the sense is, that where the signification of a language and the sense of words are not known, the speaker is like a man that lives in a strange country to him that hears him; and the hearer is like to one that lives in a strange country to him that speaks, since they cannot understand one another. The word sometimes is used for men, afwnoi h ankooi , f286 , that can neither speak nor hear, men dumb and deaf; and when words cannot be understood, the case is all one as with such persons.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 6-14 - Even an
    apostle could not edify, unless he spoke so as to be understoo by his hearers. To speak words that have no meaning to those who hea them, is but speaking into the air. That cannot answer the end of speaking, which has no meaning; in this case, speaker and hearers ar barbarians to each other. All religious services should be so performe in Christian assemblies, that all may join in, and profit by them Language plain and easy to be understood, is the most proper for publi worship, and other religious exercises. Every true follower of Chris will rather desire to do good to others, than to get a name for learning or fine speaking.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    εαν
    1437 COND ουν 3767 CONJ μη 3361 PRT-N ειδω 1492 5762 V-RAS-1S την 3588 T-ASF δυναμιν 1411 N-ASF της 3588 T-GSF φωνης 5456 N-GSF εσομαι 2071 5704 V-FXI-1S τω 3588 T-DSM λαλουντι 2980 5723 V-PAP-DSM βαρβαρος 915 A-NSM και 2532 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM λαλων 2980 5723 V-PAP-NSM εν 1722 PREP εμοι 1698 P-1DS βαρβαρος 915 A-NSM

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    11. Meaning (dunamin). Lit., force.

    Barbarian. Supposed to be originally a descriptive word of those who uttered harsh, rude accents - bar bar. Homer calls the Carians, barbarofwnoi barbar-voiced, harsh-speaking ("Illiad," 2, 867). Later, applied to all who did not speak Greek. Socrates, speaking of the way in which the Greeks divide up mankind, says: "Here they cut off the Hellenes as one species, and all the other species of mankind, which are innumerable and have no connection or common language, they include under the single name of barbarians" (Plato, "Statesman," 262). So Clytaemnestra of the captive Cassandra: "Like a swallow, endowed with an unintelligible barbaric voice" (Aeschylus, "Agamemnon," 1051). Prodicus in Plato's "Protagoras" says: "Simonides is twitting Pittacus with ignorance of the use of terms, which, in a Lesbian, who has been accustomed to speak in a barbarous language, is natural" (341).

    Aristophanes calls the birds barbarians because they sing inarticulately ("Birds," 199); and Sophocles calls a foreign land aglwssov without a tongue. "Neither Hellas nor a tongueless land" ("Trachiniae," 1060). Later, the word took the sense of outlandish or rude.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    14:11 {The meaning of the voice} (ten dunamin tes fwnes). The power (force) of the voice. {A barbarian} (barbaros). Jargon, bar-bar. The Egyptians called all barbarous who did not speak their tongue. The Greeks followed suit for all ignorant of Greek language and culture. They divided mankind into Hellenes and Barbarians. {Unto me} (en emoi). In my case, almost like a dative.


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