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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Mark 4:25


    CHAPTERS: Mark 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Mark 4:25

    ος 3739 γαρ 1063 αν 302 εχη 2192 5725 δοθησεται 1325 5701 αυτω 846 και 2532 ος 3739 ουκ 3756 εχει 2192 5719 και 2532 ο 3739 εχει 2192 5719 αρθησεται 142 5701 απ 575 αυτου 846

    Douay Rheims Bible

    For he that hath, to him shall be given: and he that hath not, that also which he hath shall be taken away from him.

    King James Bible - Mark 4:25

    For he that hath, to him shall be given: and he that hath not, from him shall be taken even that which he hath.

    World English Bible

    For whoever has, to him will more be given, and he who doesn't have, even that which he has will be taken away from him."

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-09 iv.iii.x Pg 25

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Mark 4:25

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.ii Pg 23
    Luke viii. 18; comp. Matt. xiii. 12.

    —such as the grace of paradise and the friendship of God, by means of which he might have known all things of God, if he had continued in his obedience—what wonder is it, if he,2721

    2721 That is, the natural man, the ψυχικός.

    reduced to his material nature, and banished to the toil of tilling the ground, has in his very labour, downcast and earth-gravitating as it was, handed on that earth-derived spirit of the world to his entire race, wholly natural2722

    2722 Animali = ψυχικῷ.

    and heretical as it is, and not receiving the things which belong to God? Or who will hesitate to declare the great sin of Adam to have been heresy, when he committed it by the choice2723

    2723 Electionem. By this word our author translates the Greek αἵρεσις. Comp. De Præscr. Her. 6, p. 245, supra.

    of his own will rather than of God’s?  Except that Adam never said to his fig-tree, Why hast thou made me thus? He confessed that he was led astray; and he did not conceal the seducer.  He was a very rude heretic. He was disobedient; but yet he did not blaspheme his Creator, nor blame that Author of his being, Whom from the beginning of his life he had found to be so good and excellent, and Whom he had perhaps2724

    2724 Si forte.

    made his own judge from the very first.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.ii Pg 23
    Luke viii. 18; comp. Matt. xiii. 12.

    —such as the grace of paradise and the friendship of God, by means of which he might have known all things of God, if he had continued in his obedience—what wonder is it, if he,2721

    2721 That is, the natural man, the ψυχικός.

    reduced to his material nature, and banished to the toil of tilling the ground, has in his very labour, downcast and earth-gravitating as it was, handed on that earth-derived spirit of the world to his entire race, wholly natural2722

    2722 Animali = ψυχικῷ.

    and heretical as it is, and not receiving the things which belong to God? Or who will hesitate to declare the great sin of Adam to have been heresy, when he committed it by the choice2723

    2723 Electionem. By this word our author translates the Greek αἵρεσις. Comp. De Præscr. Her. 6, p. 245, supra.

    of his own will rather than of God’s?  Except that Adam never said to his fig-tree, Why hast thou made me thus? He confessed that he was led astray; and he did not conceal the seducer.  He was a very rude heretic. He was disobedient; but yet he did not blaspheme his Creator, nor blame that Author of his being, Whom from the beginning of his life he had found to be so good and excellent, and Whom he had perhaps2724

    2724 Si forte.

    made his own judge from the very first.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xix Pg 9
    Luke viii. 18.

    and hear not,—meaning, of course, with the hearing of the heart, not of the ear. If you only attach a proper sense to the Creator’s admonition,4191

    4191 Pronuntiationi.

    suitable to the meaning of Him who was rousing the people to hear by the words, “Take heed how ye hear,” it amounted to a menace to such as would not hear. In fact,4192

    4192 Sane: with a touch of irony.

    that most merciful god of yours, who judges not, neither is angry, is minatory. This is proved even by the sentence which immediately follows:  “Whosoever hath, to him shall be given; and whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken even that which he seemeth to have.”4193

    4193


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xix Pg 12
    Luke viii. 18.

    What shall be given? The increase of faith, or understanding, or even salvation. What shall be taken away? That, of course, which shall be given. By whom shall the gift and the deprivation be made? If by the Creator it be taken away, by Him also shall it be given. If by Marcion’s god it be given, by Marcion’s god also will it be taken away. Now, for whatever reason He threatens the “deprivation,” it will not be the work of a god who knows not how to threaten, because incapable of anger. I am, moreover, astonished when he says that “a candle is not usually hidden,”4194

    4194


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxvii Pg 19
    This phrase comes not from the present passage, but from Luke viii. 18, where the words are ὅ δοκεῖ ἔχειν; here the expression is ὅ ἔχει only.

    Else, if it is the Creator whom He has here delineated as the “austere man,” who “takes up what he laid not down, and reaps what he did not sow,”4979

    4979


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xv Pg 21
    Luke xvi.

    also the answer which He gave to His disciples when they said, “Increase our faith;”3557

    3557


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxi Pg 15
    Luke xvi. 9.

    For whatsoever we acquired from unrighteousness when we were heathen, we are proved righteous, when we have become believers, by applying it to the Lord’s advantage.


    Anf-02 vi.v Pg 31.1


    Anf-02 vi.v Pg 96.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.vii Pg 11
    Luke xvi. 9.

    if we love it so much as not to put up with its loss? We shall perish together with the lost mammon.  Why do we find here, where it is our business to lose?9093

    9093


    Npnf-201 iii.ix.vii Pg 20


    Npnf-201 iv.vii.vi Pg 6


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiii Pg 18
    Meum: Luke xvi. 12, where, however, the word is τὸ ὑμέτερον, that which is your own.”

    For whatever is unrighteous ought to be foreign to the servants of God. But in what way was the Creator foreign to the Pharisees, seeing that He was the proper God of the Jewish nation?  Forasmuch then as the words, “Who will entrust to you the truer riches?” and, “Who will give you that which is mine?” are only suitable to the Creator and not to mammon, He could not have uttered them as alien to the Creator, and in the interest of the rival god. He could only seem to have spoken them in this sense, if, when remarking4788

    4788 Notando.

    their unfaithfulness to the Creator and not to mammon, He had drawn some distinctions between the Creator (in his manner of mentioning Him) and the rival god—how that the latter would not commit his own truth to those who were unfaithful to the Creator. How then can he possibly seem to belong to another god, if He be not set forth, with the express intention of being separated4789

    4789 Ad hoc ut seperatur.

    from the very thing which is in question.  But when the Pharisees “justified themselves before men,”4790

    4790


    Anf-03 v.iii.xxvi Pg 8
    Luke xix. 20–24.

    a single pound, that is, one word of His.  He used Himself to tell them that a candle was not usually “pushed away under a bushel, but placed on a candlestick,” in order to “give light to all who are in the house.”2132

    2132


    Anf-01 ix.ii.vii Pg 10
    Comp. Luke xix. 26.

    They maintain, therefore, that in every way it is always necessary for them to practise the mystery of conjunction. And that they may persuade the thoughtless to believe this, they are in the habit of using these very words, “Whosoever being in this world does not so love a woman as to obtain possession of her, is not of the truth, nor shall attain to the truth. But whosoever being of2740

    2740


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vii.x Pg 4.1


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 4

    VERSE 	(25) - 

    Mt 13:12; 25:28,29 Lu 8:18; 16:9-12; 19:24-26 Joh 15:2


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