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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Proverbs 14:1


    CHAPTERS: Proverbs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB

    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Proverbs 14:1

    σοφαι γυναικες 1135 ωκοδομησαν οικους 3624 η 2228 1510 5753 3739 3588 δε 1161 αφρων 878 κατεσκαψεν ταις 3588 χερσιν 5495 αυτης 846

    Douay Rheims Bible

    A wise woman buildeth her house: but the foolish will
    pull down with her hands that also which is built.

    King James Bible - Proverbs 14:1

    Every wise woman buildeth her house: but the foolish plucketh it down with her hands.

    World English Bible

    Every wise woman builds her house, but the foolish one tears it down with her own hands.

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-07 ix.ii.iii Pg 7, Npnf-114 vi.ii Pg 236, Npnf-114 vii.ii Pg 236, Npnf-206 v.LXIX Pg 45

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Proverbs 14:1

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 v.vii.ii Pg 7
    Prov. ix. 1.

    The Word raised up again His own temple on the third day, when it had been destroyed by the Jews fighting against Christ. The Word, when His flesh was lifted up, after the manner of the brazen serpent in the wilderness, drew all men to Himself for their eternal salvation.989

    989


    Anf-01 v.xvii.iii Pg 3
    Prov. ix. 1.

    And God the Word was born as man, with a body, of the Virgin, without any intercourse of man. For [it is written], “A virgin shall conceive in her womb, and bring forth a son.”1319

    1319


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xii Pg 2.1


    Anf-03 v.v.xxv Pg 8
    Gen. i. 31.

    while the former, according to Hermogenes, is regarded as the origin and cause of all evils. Lastly, if the one is Earth because the other is, why also is the one not Matter as the other is? Indeed, by this rule both the heaven and all creatures ought to have had the names of Earth and Matter, since they all consist of Matter. I have said enough touching the designation Earth, by which he will have it that Matter is understood. This, as everybody knows, is the name of one of the elements; for so we are taught by nature first, and afterwards by Scripture, except it be that credence must be given to that Silenus who talked so confidently in the presence of king Midas of another world, according to the account of Theopompus. But the same author informs us that there are also several gods.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xiii Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xiii Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 126.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.xv Pg 6
    i.e., as Rigaltius (referred to by Oehler), explains, after the two visions of angels who appeared to him and said, “Arise and eat.” See 1 Kings xix. 4–13. [It was the fourth, but our author having mentioned two, inadvertently calls it the third, referring to the “still small voice,” in which Elijah saw His manifestation.]

    For where God is, there too is His foster-child, namely Patience. When God’s Spirit descends, then Patience accompanies Him indivisibly. If we do not give admission to her together with the Spirit, will (He) always tarry with us? Nay, I know not whether He would remain any longer. Without His companion and handmaid, He must of necessity be straitened in every place and at every time. Whatever blow His enemy may inflict He will be unable to endure alone, being without the instrumental means of enduring.


    Anf-02 ii.iv.vi Pg 21.1


    Anf-02 ii.iv.vi Pg 21.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xi Pg 47
    Ps. iv. 7 (Sept.).

    Now the countenance (or person5724

    5724 Persona: the πρόσωπον of the Septuagint.

    ) of the Lord here is Christ. Wherefore the apostle said above: “Christ, who is the image of God.”5725

    5725


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxx Pg 2
    Deut. xxxii. 43.

    and I added what follows of the passage: “ ‘Rejoice, O ye nations, with His people, and let all the angels of God be strengthened in Him: for the blood of His sons He avenges, and will avenge, and will recompense His enemies with vengeance, and will recompense those that hate Him; and the Lord will purify the land of His people.’ And by these words He declares that we, the nations, rejoice with His people, —to wit, Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and the prophets, and, in short, all of that people who are well-pleasing to God, according to what has been already agreed on between us. But we will not receive it of all your nation; since we know from Isaiah2459

    2459 Isa. lxvi. 24.

    that the members of those who have transgressed shall be consumed by the worm and unquenchable fire, remaining immortal; so that they become a spectacle to all flesh. <index subject1="Israel applied to Chirst" title="265" id="viii.iv.cxxx-p3.2"/>But in addition to these, I wish, sirs,” said I, “to add some other passages from the very words of Moses, from which you may understand that God has from of old dispersed all men according to their kindreds and tongues; and out of all kindreds has taken to Himself your kindred, a useless, disobedient, and faithless generation; and has shown that those who were selected out of every nation have obeyed His will through Christ,—whom He calls also Jacob, and names Israel, —and these, then, as I mentioned fully previously, must be Jacob and Israel. For when He says, ‘Rejoice, O ye nations, with His people,’ He allots the same inheritance to them, and does not call them by the same name;2460

    2460 The reading is, “and calls them by the same name.” But the whole argument shows that the Jews and Gentiles are distinguished by name. [But that Gentiles are also called (Israel) by the same name is the point here.]

    but when He says that they as Gentiles rejoice with His people, He calls them Gentiles to reproach you. For even as you provoked Him to anger by your idolatry, so also He has deemed those who were idolaters worthy of knowing His will, and of inheriting His inheritance.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xli Pg 2
    Ps. xcvi. 1, etc. This last clause, which is not extant in our copies, either of the LXX, or of the Hebrew, Justin charged the Jews with erasing. See Dial. Tryph., c. 73. [Concerning the eighteen Jewish alterations, see Pearson on the Creed, art. iv. p. 335. Ed. London, 1824.]


    Anf-01 ix.vi.x Pg 4
    Ps. xcvi. 1.

    and Esaias, “Sing unto the Lord a new hymn. His beginning (initium), His name is glorified from the height of the earth: they declare His powers in the isles.”3902

    3902


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-02 vi.ii.i Pg 7.1
    Repentance, men understand, so far as nature is able, to be an emotion of the mind arising from disgust8421

    8421 “Offensa sententiæ pejoris;” or possibly, “the miscarriage of some,” etc.

    at some previously cherished worse sentiment: that kind of men I mean which even we ourselves were in days gone by—blind, without the Lord’s light.  From the reason of repentance, however, they are just as far as they are from the Author of reason Himself. Reason, in fact, is a thing of God, inasmuch as there is nothing which God the Maker of all has not provided, disposed, ordained by reason—nothing which He has not willed should be handled and understood by reason. All, therefore, who are ignorant of God, must necessarily be ignorant also of a thing which is His, because no treasure-house8422

    8422 Thesaurus.

    at all is accessible to strangers. And thus, voyaging all the universal course of life without the rudder of reason, they know not how to shun the hurricane which is impending over the world.8423

    8423 Sæculo. [Erasmus doubted the genuineness of this treatise, partly because of the comparative purity of its style. See Kaye, p. 42.]

    Moreover, how irrationally they behave in the practice of repentance, it will be enough briefly to show just by this one fact, that they exercise it even in the case of their good deeds. They repent of good faith, of love, of simple-heartedness, of patience, of mercy, just in proportion as any deed prompted by these feelings has fallen on thankless soil.  They execrate their own selves for having done good; and that species chiefly of repentance which is applied to the best works they fix in their heart, making it their care to remember never again to do a good turn. On repentance for evil deeds, on the contrary, they lay lighter stress. In short, they make this same (virtue) a means of sinning more readily than a means of right-doing.


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 33


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 9


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 52
    Jer. xvii. 5.

    Whereas in Psalm cxvii. it is said: “It is better to trust in the Lord than to put confidence in man; it is better to trust in the Lord than to place hope in princes.”4032

    4032


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 52
    Jer. xvii. 5.

    Whereas in Psalm cxvii. it is said: “It is better to trust in the Lord than to put confidence in man; it is better to trust in the Lord than to place hope in princes.”4032

    4032


    Anf-01 ix.vi.vi Pg 4
    Isa. xii. 4.

    For neither in an ambiguous, nor arrogant, nor boastful manner, does He say these things; but since it was impossible, without God, to come to a knowledge of God, He teaches men, through His Word, to know God. To those, therefore, who are ignorant of these matters, and on this account imagine that they have discovered another Father, justly does one say, “Ye do err, not knowing the Scriptures, nor the power of God.”3846

    3846


    Anf-01 ix.vi.v Pg 3
    [Jer. vii. 4. One of the most powerful arguments in all Scripture is contained in the first twelve verses of this chapter, and it rebukes an inveterate superstition of the human heart. Comp. Rev. ii. 5, and the message to Rome, Rom. xi. 21.]

    This is just as if any one should say, that if straw were a creation of God, it would never part company with the wheat; and that the vine twigs, if made by God, never would be lopped away and deprived of the clusters. But as these [vine twigs] have not been originally made for their own sake, but for that of the fruit growing upon them, which being come to maturity and taken away, they are left behind, and those which do not conduce to fructification are lopped off altogether; so also [was it with] Jerusalem, which had in herself borne the yoke of bondage (under which man was reduced, who in former times was not subject to God when death was reigning, and being subdued, became a fit subject for liberty), when the fruit of liberty had come, and reached maturity, and been reaped and stored in the barn, and when those which had the power to produce fruit had been carried away from her [i.e., from Jerusalem], and scattered throughout all the world. Even as Esaias saith, “The children of Jacob shall strike root, and Israel shall flourish, and the whole world shall be filled with his fruit.”3835

    3835


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxx Pg 4
    Gen. xlix. 10.

    And it is plain that this was spoken not of Judah, but of Christ. For all we out of all nations do expect not Judah, but Jesus, who led your fathers out of Egypt. For the prophecy referred even to the advent of Christ: ‘Till He come for whom this is laid up, and He shall be the expectation of nations.’ Jesus came, therefore, as we have shown at length, and is expected again to appear above the clouds; whose name you profane, and labour hard to get it profaned over all the earth. It were possible for me, sirs,” I continued, “to contend against you about the reading which you so interpret, saying it is written, ‘Till the things laid up for Him come;’ though the Seventy have not so explained it, but thus, ‘Till He comes for whom this is laid up.’ But since what follows indicates that the reference is to Christ (for it is, ‘and He shall be the expectation of nations’), I do not proceed to have a mere verbal controversy with you, as I have not attempted to establish proof about Christ from the passages of Scripture which are not admitted by you2409

    2409 [Note this important point. He forbears to cite the New Testament.]

    which I quoted from the words of Jeremiah the prophet, and Esdras, and David; but from those which are even now admitted by you, which had your teachers comprehended, be well assured they would have deleted them, as they did those about the death of Isaiah, whom you sawed asunder with a wooden saw. And this was a mysterious type of Christ being about to cut your nation in two, and to raise those worthy of the honour to the everlasting kingdom along with the holy patriarchs and prophets; but He has said that He will send others to the condemnation of the unquenchable fire along with similar disobedient and impenitent men from all the nations. ‘For they shall come,’ He said, ‘from the west and from the east, and shall sit down with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven; but the children of the kingdom shall be cast out into outer darkness.’2410

    2410


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xxxii Pg 2
    Gen. xlix. 10.

    It is yours to make accurate inquiry, and ascertain up to whose time the Jews had a lawgiver and king of their own. Up to the time of Jesus Christ, who taught us, and interpreted the prophecies which were not yet understood, [they had a lawgiver] as was foretold by the holy and divine Spirit of prophecy through Moses, “that a ruler would not fail the Jews until He should come for whom the kingdom was reserved” (for Judah was the forefather of the Jews, from whom also they have their name of Jews); and after He (i.e., Christ) appeared, you began to rule the Jews, and gained possession of all their territory. And the prophecy, “He shall be the expectation of the nations,” signified that there would be some of all nations who should look for Him to come again. And this indeed you can see for yourselves, and be convinced of by fact. For of all races of men there are some who look for Him who was crucified in Judæa, and after whose crucifixion the land was straightway surrendered to you as spoil of war. And the prophecy, “binding His foal to the vine, and washing His robe in the blood of the grape,” was a significant symbol of the things that were to happen to Christ, and of what He was to do. For the foal of an ass stood bound to a vine at the entrance of a village, and He ordered His acquaintances to bring it to Him then; and when it was brought, He mounted and sat upon it, and entered Jerusalem, where was the vast temple of the Jews which was afterwards destroyed by you. And after this He was crucified, that the rest of the prophecy might be fulfilled. <index subject1="Christ Jesus" subject2="blood of" title="173" id="viii.ii.xxxii-p2.2"/>For this “washing His robe in the blood of the grape” was predictive of the passion He was to endure, cleansing by His blood those who believe on Him. For what is called by the Divine Spirit through the prophet “His robe,” are those men who believe in Him in whom abideth the seed1828

    1828 Grabe would here read, not σπέρμα, but πνεῦμα, the spirit; but the Benedictine, Otto, and Trollope all think that no change should be made.

    of God, the Word. And what is spoken of as “the blood of the grape,” signifies that He who should appear would have blood, though not of the seed of man, but of the power of God. <index subject1="Christ Jesus" subject2="called the Word" title="173" id="viii.ii.xxxii-p3.3"/>And the first power after God the Father and Lord of all is the Word, who is also the Son; and of Him we will, in what follows, relate how He took flesh and became man. For as man did not make the blood of the vine, but God, so it was hereby intimated that the blood should not be of human seed, but of divine power, as we have said above. And Isaiah, another prophet, foretelling the same things in other words, spoke thus: “A star shall rise out of Jacob, and a flower shall spring from the root of Jesse; and His arm shall the nations trust.1829

    1829


    Anf-01 v.vi.ix Pg 12
    Gen. xlix. 10.

    have been fulfilled in the Gospel, [our Lord saying,] “Go ye and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.”964

    964


    Anf-01 viii.ii.liv Pg 2
    Gen. xlix. 10.

    The devils, accordingly, when they heard these prophetic words, said that Bacchus was the son of Jupiter, and gave out that he was the discoverer of the vine, and they number wine1883

    1883 In the ms. the reading is οἶνον (wine); but as Justin’s argument seems to require ὄνον (an ass), Sylburg inserted this latter word in his edition; and this reading is approved by Grabe and Thirlby, and adopted by Otto and Trollope. It may be added, that ἀναγράφουσι is much more suitable to ὄνον than to οἶνον.

    [or, the ass] among his mysteries; and they taught that, having been torn in pieces, he ascended into heaven. And because in the prophecy of Moses it had not been expressly intimated whether He who was to come was the Son of God, and whether He would, riding on the foal, remain on earth or ascend into heaven, and because the name of “foal” could mean either the foal of an ass or the foal of a horse, they, not knowing whether He who was foretold would bring the foal of an ass or of a horse as the sign of His coming, nor whether He was the Son of God, as we said above, or of man, gave out that Bellerophon, a man born of man, himself ascended to heaven on his horse Pegasus. And when they heard it said by the other prophet Isaiah, that He should be born of a virgin, and by His own means ascend into heaven, they pretended that Perseus was spoken of. And when they knew what was said, as has been cited above, in the prophecies written aforetime, “Strong as a giant to run his course,”1884

    1884


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lii Pg 2
    [Bible:Gen.49.11 Bible:Gen.49.18 Bible:Gen.49.24">Gen. xlix. 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 18, 24. These texts are frequently referred to by Justin.]

    that there would be two advents of Christ, and that in the first He would suffer, and that after He came there would be neither prophet nor king in your nation (I proceeded), and that the nations who believed in the suffering Christ would look for His future appearance. And for this reason the Holy Spirit had uttered these truths in a parable, and obscurely: for,” I added, “it is said, ‘Judah, thy brethren have praised thee: thy hands [shall be] on the neck of thine enemies; the sons of thy father shall worship thee. Judah is a lion’s whelp; from the germ, my son, thou art sprung up. Reclining, he lay down like a lion, and like [a lion’s] whelp: who shall raise him up? A ruler shall not depart from Judah, or a leader from his thighs, until that which is laid up in store for him shall come; and he shall be the desire of nations, binding his foal to the vine, and the foal of his ass to the tendril of the vine. He shall wash his garments in wine, and his vesture in the blood of the grape. His eyes shall be bright with2113

    2113 Or, “in comparison of.”

    wine, and his teeth white like milk.’2114

    2114


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xi Pg 11
    Gen. xlix. 10–12, LXX.

    For, let those who have the reputation of investigating everything, inquire at what time a prince and leader failed out of Judah, and who is the hope of the nations, who also is the vine, what was the ass’s colt [referred to as] His, what the clothing, and what the eyes, what the teeth, and what the wine, and thus let them investigate every one of the points mentioned; and they shall find that there was none other announced than our Lord, Christ Jesus. Wherefore Moses, when chiding the ingratitude of the people, said, “Ye infatuated people, and unwise, do ye thus requite the Lord?”3925

    3925


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxvi Pg 6
    Isa. lxv. 21.

    For all these and other words were unquestionably spoken in reference to the resurrection of the just, which takes place after the coming of Antichrist, and the destruction of all nations under his rule; in [the times of] which [resurrection] the righteous shall reign in the earth, waxing stronger by the sight of the Lord: and through Him they shall become accustomed to partake in the glory of God the Father, and shall enjoy in the kingdom intercourse and communion with the holy angels, and union with spiritual beings; and [with respect to] those whom the Lord shall find in the flesh, awaiting Him from heaven, and who have suffered tribulation, as well as escaped the hands of the Wicked one. For it is in reference to them that the prophet says: “And those that are left shall multiply upon the earth,” And Jeremiah4770

    4770


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xvi Pg 6
    Isa. lxv. 22.

    ), He is shown to be the only God who accomplishes these things, and as Himself the good Father, benevolently conferring life upon those who have not life from themselves.


    Anf-02 ii.ii.i Pg 36.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiv Pg 19
    See Zech. iii. “The mystery of His name” refers to the meaning of “Jeshua,” for which see c. ix. above.

    First, He was clad in “sordid attire,” that is, in the indignity of passible and mortal flesh, when the devil, withal, was opposing himself to Him—the instigator, to wit, of Judas the traitor1462

    1462


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.vii Pg 22
    See Zech. iii.

    If I may offer, moreover, an interpretation of the two goats which were presented on “the great day of atonement,”3200

    3200


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 23.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 64.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.xi Pg 19.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 6.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.lii Pg 4
    Ps. l. 14, 15.

    For “the sacrifice of God is a broken spirit.”235

    235


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 8
    Ps. l. 14, 15.

    rejecting, indeed, those things by which sinners imagined they could propitiate God, and showing that He does Himself stand in need of nothing; but He exhorts and advises them to those things by which man is justified and draws nigh to God. This same declaration does Esaias make: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto Me? saith the Lord. I am full.”4014

    4014


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 7.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 14
    Or, “speech.” The reference seems to be to ver. 23, but there is no such statement in Daniel.

    I make thee these answers.” Whence we are bound to compute from the first year of Darius, when Daniel saw this vision.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiv Pg 28
    Mal. ii. 15.

    Thus you have Christ following spontaneously the tracks of the Creator everywhere, both in permitting divorce and in forbidding it. You find Him also protecting marriage, in whatever direction you try to escape. He prohibits divorce when He will have the marriage inviolable; He permits divorce when the marriage is spotted with unfaithfulness. You should blush when you refuse to unite those whom even your Christ has united; and repeat the blush when you disunite them without the good reason why your Christ would have them separated. I have4829

    4829 Debeo.

    now to show whence the Lord derived this decision4830

    4830 Sententiam.

    of His, and to what end He directed it.  It will thus become more fully evident that His object was not the abolition of the Mosaic ordinance4831

    4831 Literally, “Moses.”

    by any suddenly devised proposal of divorce; because it was not suddenly proposed, but had its root in the previously mentioned John. For John reproved Herod, because he had illegally married the wife of his deceased brother, who had a daughter by her (a union which the law permitted only on the one occasion of the brother dying childless,4832

    4832 Illiberis. [N.B.  He supposes Philip to have been dead.]

    when it even prescribed such a marriage, in order that by his own brother, and from his own wife,4833

    4833 Costa: literally, “rib” or “side.”

    seed might be reckoned to the deceased husband),4834

    4834


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xii Pg 10
    [1 Kings xviii. 27. “It came to pass that Elijah mocked them,” etc. This reductio ad absurdum of our author is singularly applicable to certain forms of what is called “Modern Thought.”]

    For if it is fitting that that language which is used respecting the universe be transformed to the primary Tetrad, and if any one may assign names at his pleasure, who shall prevent us from adopting these names, as being much more credible [than the others], as well as in general use, and understood by all?


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 168.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xvi Pg 48.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ii Pg 14
    Gen. vi. 9; vii. 1; comp. Heb. xi. 7.

    if in his case the righteousness of a natural law had not preceded? Whence was Abraham accounted “a friend of God,”1149

    1149


    Anf-01 ix.vi.v Pg 13
    Ps. xlix. 12.



    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.xiii Pg 2.1


    Anf-01 ix.vii.ix Pg 10
    Ps. xlix. 20.

    This denotes that, for his own fault, he is likened to cattle, by rivalling their irrational life. And we also, as the custom is, do designate men of this stamp as cattle and irrational beasts.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.xiii Pg 2.1


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xxxii Pg 6
    Ps. xlix. 20.

    ), it does not on this account follow that rapacious persons become kites, lewd persons dogs, ill-tempered ones panthers, good men sheep, talkative ones swallows, and chaste men doves, as if the selfsame substance of the soul everywhere repeated its own nature in the properties of the animals (into which it passed). Besides, a substance is one thing, and the nature of that substance is another thing; inasmuch as the substance is the special property of one given thing, whereas the nature thereof may possibly belong to many things.  Take an example or two. A stone or a piece of iron is the substance: the hardness of the stone and the iron is the nature of the substance. Their hardness combines objects by a common quality; their substances keep them separate.  Then, again, there is softness in wool, and softness in a feather: their natural qualities are alike, (and put them on a par;) their substantial qualities are not alike, (and keep them distinct.) Thus, if a man likewise be designated a wild beast or a harmless one, there is not for all that an identity of soul. Now the similarity of nature is even then observed, when dissimilarity of substance is most conspicuous: for, by the very fact of your judging that a man resembles a beast, you confess that their soul is not identical; for you say that they resemble each other, not that they are the same. This is also the meaning of the word of God (which we have just quoted): it likens man to the beasts in nature, but not in substance. Besides, God would not have actually made such a comment as this concerning man, if He had known him to be in substance only bestial.


    Anf-03 v.viii.lii Pg 9
    Ps. xlix. 20, Sept.

    ), “another flesh of birds” (that is, the martyrs which essay to mount up to heaven), “another of fishes” (that is, those whom the water of baptism has submerged).7681

    7681


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xvi Pg 48.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xiii Pg 6.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.ii Pg 6
    See Ps. lxxiv. 23 in A.V. It is Ps. lxxiii. in the LXX.

    so that by His own patience He disparages Himself; for the cause why many believe not in the Lord is that they are so long without knowing9024

    9024 Because they see no visible proof of it.

    that He is wroth with the world.9025

    9025 Sæculo.



    Anf-01 v.xviii.v Pg 3
    1 Sam. xvi.

    For he himself says in a certain place, “I was small among my brethren, and the youngest in the house of my father.”1372

    1372 Ps. cl. 1 (in the Septuagint; not found at all in Hebrew).


    Anf-03 v.iii.iii Pg 16
    Ex. xvi. 8.

    No one of those has, [in fact,] remained unpunished, who rose up against their superiors. For Dathan and Abiram did not speak against the law, but against Moses,657

    657


    ecf09Oz16z13,


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 11
    In Isa. viii. 8; 10, compared with vii. 14 in the Eng. ver. and the LXX., and also Lowth, introductory remarks on ch. viii.

    —in order that you may regard not the sound only of the name, but the sense too. For the Hebrew sound, which is Emmanuel, has an interpretation, which is, God with us. Inquire, then, whether this speech, “God with us” (which is Emmanuel), be commonly applied to Christ ever since Christ’s light has dawned, and I think you will not deny it. For they who out of Judaism believe in Christ, ever since their believing on Him, do, whenever they shall wish to say1257

    1257 Or, “to call him.”

    Emmanuel, signify that God is with us:  and thus it is agreed that He who was ever predicted as Emmanuel is already come, because that which Emmanuel signifies is come—that is, “God with us.” Equally are they led by the sound of the name when they so understand “the power of Damascus,” and “the spoils of Samaria,” and “the kingdom of the Assyrians,” as if they portended Christ as a warrior; not observing that Scripture premises, “since, ere the child learn to call father or mother, he shall receive the power of Damascus and the spoils of Samaria, in opposition to the king of the Assyrians.” For the first step is to look at the demonstration of His age, to see whether the age there indicated can possibly exhibit the Christ as already a man, not to say a general. Forsooth, by His babyish cry the infant would summon men to arms, and would give the signal of war not with clarion, but with rattle, and point out the foe, not from His charger’s back or from a rampart, but from the back or neck of His suckler and nurse, and thus subdue Damascus and Samaria in place of the breast. (It is another matter if, among you, infants rush out into battle,—oiled first, I suppose, to dry in the sun, and then armed with satchels and rationed on butter,—who are to know how to lance sooner than how to lacerate the bosom!)1258

    1258 See adv. Marc. l. iii. c. xiii., which, with the preceding chapter, should be compared throughout with the chapter before us.

    Certainly, if nature nowhere allows this,—(namely,) to serve as a soldier before developing into manhood, to take “the power of Damascus” before knowing your father,—it follows that the pronouncement is visibly figurative.  “But again,” say they, “nature suffers not a ‘virgin’ to be a parent; and yet the prophet must be believed.”  And deservedly so; for he bespoke credit for a thing incredible, by saying that it was to be a sign. “Therefore,” he says, “shall a sign be given you. Behold, a virgin shall conceive in womb, and bear a son.” But a sign from God, unless it had consisted in some portentous novelty, would not have appeared a sign. In a word, if, when you are anxious to cast any down from (a belief in) this divine prediction, or to convert whoever are simple, you have the audacity to lie, as if the Scripture contained (the announcement), that not “a virgin,” but “a young female,” was to conceive and bring forth; you are refuted even by this fact, that a daily occurrence—the pregnancy and parturition of a young female, namely—cannot possibly seem anything of a sign. And the setting before us, then, of a virgin-mother is deservedly believed to be a sign; but not equally so a warrior-infant.  For there would not in this case again be involved the question of a sign; but, the sign of a novel birth having been awarded, the next step after the sign is, that there is enunciated a different ensuing ordering1259

    1259


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.iii Pg 7.3


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 44
    Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11" id="v.iv.vi.vi-p44.1" parsed="|1Cor|3|19|3|20;|Job|5|13|0|0;|Ps|94|11|0|0" osisRef="Bible:1Cor.3.19-1Cor.3.20 Bible:Job.5.13 Bible:Ps.94.11">1 Cor. iii. 19, 20; Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11.

    For in general we may conclude for certain that he could not possibly have cited the authority of that God whom he was bound to destroy, since he would not teach for Him.5467

    5467 Si non illi doceret.

    “Therefore,” says he, “let no man glory in man;”5468

    5468


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lvi Pg 34
    Gen. xviii. 20–23.

    (and so on,2143

    2143 Comp. Note 2, p. 223.

    for I do not think fit to write over again the same words, having written them all before, but shall of necessity give those by which I established the proof to Trypho and his companions. Then I proceeded to what follows, in which these words are recorded:) “ ‘And the Lord went His way as soon as He had left communing with Abraham; and [Abraham] went to his place. And there came two angels to Sodom at even. And Lot sat in the gate of Sodom;’2144

    2144


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xi Pg 13.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxvii Pg 5
    Dan. xii. 4; 7.

    But Jeremiah also says, “In the last days they shall understand these things.”4153

    4153


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxvii Pg 5
    Dan. xii. 4; 7.

    But Jeremiah also says, “In the last days they shall understand these things.”4153

    4153


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 12
    Deut. xiii. 1.

    But also in another section,8238

    8238 Of course our division of the Scripture by chapter and verse did not exist in the days of Tertullian.—Tr.

    “If, however, thy brother, the son of thy father or of thy mother, or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend who is as thine own soul, solicit thee, saying secretly, Let us go and serve other gods, which thou knowest not, nor did thy fathers, of the gods of the nations which are round about thee, very nigh unto thee or far off from thee, do not consent to go with him, and do not hearken to him. Thine eye shall not spare him, neither shalt thou pity, neither shalt thou preserve him; thou shalt certainly inform upon him.  Thine hand shall be first upon him to kill him, and afterwards the hand of thy people; and ye shall stone him, and he shall die, seeing he has sought to turn thee away from the Lord thy God.”8239

    8239


    Anf-01 v.vi.iii Pg 8
    Deut. xiii. 6; 18.

    You ought therefore to “hate those that hate God, and to waste away [with grief] on account of His enemies.”899

    899


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 51
    Isa. iii. 12.

    In another passage He forbids all implicit trust in man, and likewise in the applause of man; as by the prophet Jeremiah: “Cursed be the man that trusteth in man.”4031

    4031


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 12
    Deut. xiii. 1.

    But also in another section,8238

    8238 Of course our division of the Scripture by chapter and verse did not exist in the days of Tertullian.—Tr.

    “If, however, thy brother, the son of thy father or of thy mother, or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend who is as thine own soul, solicit thee, saying secretly, Let us go and serve other gods, which thou knowest not, nor did thy fathers, of the gods of the nations which are round about thee, very nigh unto thee or far off from thee, do not consent to go with him, and do not hearken to him. Thine eye shall not spare him, neither shalt thou pity, neither shalt thou preserve him; thou shalt certainly inform upon him.  Thine hand shall be first upon him to kill him, and afterwards the hand of thy people; and ye shall stone him, and he shall die, seeing he has sought to turn thee away from the Lord thy God.”8239

    8239


    Anf-01 v.vi.iii Pg 8
    Deut. xiii. 6; 18.

    You ought therefore to “hate those that hate God, and to waste away [with grief] on account of His enemies.”899

    899


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 51
    Isa. iii. 12.

    In another passage He forbids all implicit trust in man, and likewise in the applause of man; as by the prophet Jeremiah: “Cursed be the man that trusteth in man.”4031

    4031


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 27
    Oehler refers to Isa. xix. 1. See, too, Isa. xxx. and xxxi.

    So, again, Babylon, in our own John, is a figure of the city Rome, as being equally great and proud of her sway, and triumphant over the saints.1273

    1273


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.vi Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.iii Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.vi Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.iii Pg 5.1


    Anf-01 viii.ii.lxiii Pg 2
    Isa. i. 3.

    And Jesus the Christ, because the Jews knew not what the Father was, and what the Son, in like manner accused them; and Himself said, “No one knoweth the Father, but the Son; nor the Son, but the Father, and they to whom the Son revealeth Him.”1899

    1899


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xx Pg 2
    Isa. i. 3.

    they pervert his words to mean ignorance of the invisible Bythus. And that which is spoken by Hosea, “There is no truth in them, nor the knowledge of God,”2907

    2907


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xxxvii Pg 2
    Isa. i. 3. This quotation varies only in one word from that of the LXX.

    And again elsewhere, when the same prophet speaks in like manner from the person of the Father, “What is the house that ye will build for Me? saith the Lord. The heaven is My throne, and the earth is My footstool.”1842

    1842


    Anf-01 viii.ii.lxiii Pg 6
    Isa. i. 3.

    And again, Jesus, as we have already shown, while He was with them, said, “No one knoweth the Father, but the Son; nor the Son but the Father, and those to whom the Son will reveal Him.”1903

    1903


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.x Pg 6.1
    1580


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 36.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.viii Pg 32.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.vi Pg 14
    Isa. i. 2, 3.

    We indeed, who know for certain that Christ always spoke in the prophets, as the Spirit of the Creator (for so says the prophet: “The person of our Spirit, Christ the Lord,”3169

    3169 This seems to be a translation with a slight alteration of the LXX. version of Lam. iv. 20, πνεῦμα προσώπου ἡμῶν Χριστὸς Κύριος .

    who from the beginning was both heard and seen as the Father’s vicegerent in the name of God), are well aware that His words, when actually upbraiding Israel, were the same as those which it was foretold that He should denounce against him: “Ye have forsaken the Lord, and have provoked the Holy One of Israel to anger.”3170

    3170


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 38
    Isa. i. 3.

    nor to the Gentiles: “For, behold,” says He, “of the nations I have no man.”4501

    4501


    Anf-03 vi.vii.iv Pg 11
    Obsequii. For the sentiment, compare Isa. i. 3.

    Finally, (the creatures) which obey, acknowledge their masters. Do we hesitate to listen diligently to Him to whom alone we are subjected—that is, the Lord?  But how unjust is it, how ungrateful likewise, not to repay from yourself the same which, through the indulgence of your neighbour, you obtain from others, to him through whom you obtain it!  Nor needs there more words on the exhibition of obedience9040

    9040 Obsequii.

    due from us to the Lord God; for the acknowledgment9041

    9041 See above, “the creatures…acknowledge their masters.”

    of God understands what is incumbent on it.  Lest, however, we seem to have inserted remarks on obedience9042

    9042 Obsequio.

    as something irrelevant, (let us remember) that obedience9043

    9043 Obsequio.

    itself is drawn from patience. Never does an impatient man render it, or a patient fail to find pleasure9044

    9044 “Oblectatur” Oehler reads with the mss.  The editors, as he says, have emended “Obluctatur,” which Mr. Dodgson reads.

    in it. Who, then, could treat largely (enough) of the good of that patience which the Lord God, the Demonstrator and Acceptor of all good things, carried about in His own self?9045

    9045 See the previous chapter.

    To whom, again, would it be doubtful that every good thing ought, because it pertains9046

    9046 See the previous chapter.

    to God, to be earnestly pursued with the whole mind by such as pertain to God? By means of which (considerations) both commendation and exhortation9047

    9047 See chap. i.

    on the subject of patience are briefly, and as it were in the compendium of a prescriptive rule, established.9048

    9048 [All our author’s instances of this principle of the Præscriptio are noteworthy, as interpreting its use in the Advs. Hæreses.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 27
    Isa. i. 3.

    and as to their preferring the establishment of their own righteousness, (the Creator again describes them as) “teaching for doctrines the commandments of men;”5862

    5862


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 3, 4.

    So likewise that conditional threat of the sword, “If ye refuse and hear me not, the sword shall devour you,”3423

    3423


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 36
    Isa. lvii. i.

    When does this more frequently happen than in the persecution of His saints? This, indeed, is no ordinary matter,4291

    4291 We have, by understanding res, treated these adjectives as nouns. Rigalt. applies them to the doctrina of the sentence just previous. Perhaps, however, “persecutione” is the noun.

    no common casualty of the law of nature; but it is that illustrious devotion, that fighting for the faith, wherein whosoever loses his life for God saves it, so that you may here again recognize the Judge who recompenses the evil gain of life with its destruction, and the good loss thereof with its salvation. It is, however, a jealous God whom He here presents to me; one who returns evil for evil.  “For whosoever,” says He, “shall be ashamed of me, of him will I also be ashamed.”4292

    4292


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 8
    Deut. vi. 12.

    But setting before them blessings and curses, He also says: “Blessings shall be yours, if ye obey the commandments of the Lord your God, whatsoever I command you this day, and do not wander from the way which I have commanded you, to go and serve other gods whom ye know not.”8234

    8234


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 32
    Deut. viii. 12–14.

    In similar terms, when king Hezekiah became proud of his treasures, and gloried in them rather than in God before those who had come on an embassy from Babylon,4012

    4012 Tertullian says, ex Perside.

    (the Creator) breaks forth4013

    4013 Insilit.

    against him by the mouth of Isaiah:  “Behold, the days come when all that is in thine house, and that which thy fathers have laid up in store, shall be carried to Babylon.”4014

    4014


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxix Pg 52
    Comp. Deut. viii. 12–14.

    Some places there were in Jerusalem where to teach; other places outside Jerusalem whither to retire5064

    5064


    Anf-01 ii.ii.iii Pg 3
    Deut. xxxii. 15.

    Hence flowed emulation and envy, strife and sedition, persecution and disorder, war and captivity. So the worthless rose up against the honoured, those of no reputation against such as were renowned, the foolish against the wise, the young against those advanced in years. <index subject1="Envy" subject2="its effect on Corinthian Church" title="6" id="ii.ii.iii-p3.2"/><index subject1="Strife, its effects" title="6" id="ii.ii.iii-p3.3"/>For this reason righteousness and peace are now far departed from you, inasmuch as every one abandons the fear of God, and is become blind in His faith,15

    15 It seems necessary to refer


    Anf-01 v.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Deut. xxxii. 15.

    and “become gross,” sets at nought His doctrine, shall go into hell. <index subject1="Falsehood" title="56" id="v.ii.xvi-p7.2"/>In like manner, every one that has received from God the power of distinguishing, and yet follows an unskilful shepherd, and receives a false opinion for the truth, shall be punished. <index subject1="Idols, vanity of" title="56" id="v.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>“What communion hath light with darkness? or Christ with Belial? Or what portion hath he that believeth with an infidel? or the temple of God with idols?”601

    601


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xx Pg 3
    Deut. xxxii. 15.

    For it was told you by Moses in the book of Genesis, that God granted to Noah, being a just man, to eat of every animal, but not of flesh with the blood, which is dead.”1996

    1996 νεκριμαῖον, or “dieth of itself;” com. reading was ἐκριμαῖον, which was supposed to be derived from ἐκρίπτω, and to mean “which ought to be cast out:” the above was suggested by H. Stephanus.

    And as he was ready to say, “as the green herbs,” I anticipated him: “Why do you not receive this statement, ‘as the green herbs,’ in the sense in which it was given by God, to wit, that just as God has granted the herbs for sustenance to man, even so has He given the animals for the diet of flesh? But, you say, a distinction was laid down thereafter to Noah, because we do not eat certain herbs. As you interpret it, the thing is incredible. And first I shall not occupy myself with this, though able to say and to hold that every vegetable is food, and fit to be eaten. But although we discriminate between green herbs, not eating all, we refrain from eating some, not because they are common or unclean, but because they are bitter, or deadly, or thorny. But we lay hands on and take of all herbs which are sweet, very nourishing and good, whether they are marine or land plants. Thus also God by the mouth of Moses commanded you to abstain from unclean and improper1997

    1997 ἄὸικος καὶ παράνομος.

    and violent animals: when, moreover, though you were eating manna in the desert, and were seeing all those wondrous acts wrought for you by God, you made and worshipped the golden calf.1998

    1998 “The reasoning of St. Justin is not quite clear to interpreters. As we abstain from some herbs, not because they are forbidden by law, but because they are deadly; so the law of abstinence from improper and violent animals was imposed not on Noah, but on you as a yoke on account of your sins.”—Maranus.

    Hence he cries continually, and justly, ‘They are foolish children, in whom is no faith.’1999

    1999


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xi Pg 56.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.iii Pg 3
    So Mr. Dodgson; and La Cerda, as quoted by Oehler. See Ps. cxxxi. 1 in LXX., where it is Ps. cxxx.

    but what is that which, in a certain way, has been grasped by hand9027

    9027


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xi Pg 39.1


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 14

    VERSE 	(1) - 

    Pr 24:3,4; 31:10-31 Ru 4:11


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET