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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 1 Corinthians 1:2


    CHAPTERS: 1 Corinthians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31

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    King James Bible - 1 Corinthians 1:2

    Unto the church of God which is at Corinth, to them that are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, with all that in every place call upon the name of Jesus Christ our Lord, both theirs and ours:

    World English Bible

    to the
    assembly of God which is at Corinth; those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, with all who call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ in every place, both theirs and ours:

    Douay-Rheims - 1 Corinthians 1:2

    To the church of God that is at Corinth, to them that are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, with all that invoke the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, in every
    place of theirs and ours.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    To the church of God which is at Corinth, to them that are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, with all that in every
    place call upon the name of Jesus Christ our Lord, both theirs and ours.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    τη
    3588 T-DSF εκκλησια 1577 N-DSF του 3588 T-GSM θεου 2316 N-GSM τη 3588 T-DSF ουση 5607 5752 V-PXP-DSF εν 1722 PREP κορινθω 2882 N-DSF ηγιασμενοις 37 5772 V-RPP-DPM εν 1722 PREP χριστω 5547 N-DSM ιησου 2424 N-DSM κλητοις 2822 A-DPM αγιοις 40 A-DPM συν 4862 PREP πασιν 3956 A-DPM τοις 3588 T-DPM επικαλουμενοις 1941 5734 V-PMP-DPM το 3588 T-ASN ονομα 3686 N-ASN του 3588 T-GSM κυριου 2962 N-GSM ημων 2257 P-1GP ιησου 2424 N-GSM χριστου 5547 N-GSM εν 1722 PREP παντι 3956 A-DSM τοπω 5117 N-DSM αυτων 846 P-GPM τε 5037 PRT και 2532 CONJ ημων 2257 P-1GP

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (2) -
    Ac 18:1,8-11 2Co 1:1 Ga 1:2 1Th 1:1 2Th 1:1 1Ti 3:15

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 1:2

    a la Iglesia de Dios que est en Corinto, santificados en Cristo Jess, llamados a ser santos, y a todos los que invocan el Nombre del Seor nuestro, Jess, el Cristo, en cualquier lugar, Seor de ellos y nuestro;

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 1 Corinthians 1:2

    Verse 2. The
    Church of God which is at Corinth] This Church was planted by the apostle himself about A. D. 52, as we learn from Acts xviii. 1, &c., where see the notes.

    Sanctified in Christ Jesus] hgiasmenoiv, Separated from the corruptions of their place and age.

    Called to be saints] klhtoiv agioiv, Constituted saints, or invited to become such; this was the design of the Gospel, for Jesus Christ came to save men from their sins.

    With all that in every place, &c.] All who profess Christianity, both in Corinth, Ephesus, and other parts of Greece or Asia Minor; and by this we see that the apostle intended that this epistle should be a general property of the universal Church of Christ; though there are several matters in it that are suited to the state of the Corinthians only.

    Both theirs and ours] That is, Jesus Christ is the common Lord and saviour of all. He is the exclusive property of no one Church, or people, or nation. Calling on or invoking the name of the Lord Jesus, was the proper distinguishing mark of a Christian. In those times of apostolic light and purity no man attempted to invoke God but in the name of Jesus Christ; this is what genuine Christians still mean when they ask any thing from God for Christ's SAKE.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 2. Unto the church of God which is at Corinth , etc.] This epistle is inscribed to the saints at Corinth; who are described by their being the church of God, a particular congregated church; a number of persons gathered out of the world, and joined together in holy fellowship, carrying on the worship of God together, and walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord; a very high character this, to be called the church of God, which is the pillar and ground of truth: and it may be observed, that this is here given to a people, among whom were many irregularities, errors, disorders, and divisions; which shows, that a church of God is not to be unchurched for everything that is amiss in them: they are further described by the place of their abode, Corinth, the metropolis of Achaia; a very large and opulent city, a place of great trade and commerce, and famous both for its wealth and wisdom; but not so famous for anything as this, that there was a church of Christ in it; of the city of Corinth, (see Gill on Acts 18:1); and of the church, (see Gill on Acts 18:8). The members of it in general, for it cannot be thought to hold good of every individual, are said to be sanctified in Christ Jesus ; not by baptism, for they were sanctified before that; but were set apart, or chosen in Christ from all eternity, to grace here, which sense the word sanctified is sometimes used; and to whom Christ they were sanctified by his Spirit in his name, out of that and holiness which is in him: wherefore it follows, ; for though they were chosen to holiness in Christ, and unholy; though Christ had given himself for them to sanctify and purify uncalled were impure; they fell in Adam, and became both unholy and unclean, and were so in their lives and conversations; nor are their own free will, but were become such through the powerful grace of principles of holiness were wrought in them; and by which they were called And this epistle is not only inscribed to these saints at with all that in every place call upon the name of Jesus Christ our Lord as in Achaia, of which Invocation of the name of Christ not only respects prayer to him, but being given to Christ, and perforated in his name, is a very considerable Ethiopic version here styles him, any but a divine person, one that is truly and properly God, without phrase , either, as some think, refers to every place and so Syriac, and Arabic versions; and the sense is, that whether in was, or the Corinthians were, or any of the other saints in signifying, that invocation of God is not confined to any particular place, rather it refers to our Lord, and shows that Christ is the common Lord of therefore ought to love one another. Ver. 3. Grace be unto you, and peace from God , etc.] This is an usual salutation in all Pauls epistles; (see Gill on Romans 1:7).

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-9 - All
    Christians are by baptism dedicated and devoted to Christ, and ar under strict obligations to be holy. But in the true church of God ar all who are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, and wh call upon him as God manifest in the flesh, for all the blessings of salvation; who acknowledge and obey him as their Lord, and as Lord of all; it includes no other persons. Christians are distinguished from the profane and atheists, that they dare not live without prayer; an they are distinguished from Jews and pagans, that they call on the nam of Christ. Observe how often in these verses the apostle repeats the words, Our Lord Jesus Christ. He feared not to make too frequent or to honourable mention of him. To all who called upon Christ, the apostl gave his usual salutation, desiring, in their behalf, the pardonin mercy, sanctifying grace, and comforting peace of God, through Jesu Christ. Sinners can have no peace with God, nor any from him, but through Christ. He gives thanks for their conversion to the faith of Christ; that grace was given them by Jesus Christ. They had bee enriched by him with all spiritual gifts. He speaks of utterance an knowledge. And where God has given these two gifts, he has given grea power for usefulness. These were gifts of the Holy Ghost, by which God bore witness to the apostles. Those that wait for the coming of ou Lord Jesus Christ, will be kept by him to the end; and those that ar so, will be blameless in the day of Christ, made so by rich and fre grace. How glorious are the hopes of such a privilege; to be kept by the power of Christ, from the power of our corruptions and Satan' temptations!


    Greek Textus Receptus


    τη
    3588 T-DSF εκκλησια 1577 N-DSF του 3588 T-GSM θεου 2316 N-GSM τη 3588 T-DSF ουση 5607 5752 V-PXP-DSF εν 1722 PREP κορινθω 2882 N-DSF ηγιασμενοις 37 5772 V-RPP-DPM εν 1722 PREP χριστω 5547 N-DSM ιησου 2424 N-DSM κλητοις 2822 A-DPM αγιοις 40 A-DPM συν 4862 PREP πασιν 3956 A-DPM τοις 3588 T-DPM επικαλουμενοις 1941 5734 V-PMP-DPM το 3588 T-ASN ονομα 3686 N-ASN του 3588 T-GSM κυριου 2962 N-GSM ημων 2257 P-1GP ιησου 2424 N-GSM χριστου 5547 N-GSM εν 1722 PREP παντι 3956 A-DSM τοπω 5117 N-DSM αυτων 846 P-GPM τε 5037 PRT και 2532 CONJ ημων 2257 P-1GP

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    2.
    Corinth. The Corinth of this period owed the beginning of its prosperity to Julius Caesar, who, a hundred years after its destruction by Mummius (B.C. 146), rebuilt and peopled it with a colony of veterans and freedmen. It was situated on the isthmus which divided Northern Greece from the Peloponnesus. It had three harbors, Cenchreae and Schoenus on the east, and Lechaeumn on the west. The isthmus, forming the only line of march for an invading or retreating army, was of the greatest military importance. It was known as "the eye of Greece." By Pindar it was called "the bridge of the sea;" by Xenophon, "the gate of the Peloponnesus;" and by Strabo, "the acropolis of Greece." In more modern times it was known as "the Gibraltar of Greece." Hence, at least as early as the march of Xerxes into Greece, it was crossed by a wall, which, in later times, became a massive and important fortification, especially in the decline of the Roman Empire. Justinian fortified it with an hundred and fifty towers. The citadel rose two thousand feet above the sea-level, on a rock with precipitous sides. In the days of the Achaean league it was called one of the "fetters" of Greece. "It runs out boldly from the surging mountain chains of the Peninsula, like an outpost or sentry, guarding the approach from the North. In days when news was transmitted by fire-signals, 76 we can imagine how all the southern country must have depended on the watch upon the rock of Corinth" (Mahaffy, "Rambles and Studies in Greece").

    At its narrowest part the isthmus was crossed by a level track called the diolcus, over which vessels were dragged on rollers from one port to the other. This was in constant use, because seamen were thus enabled to avoid sailing round the dangerous promontory of Malea, the southern extremity of the Peloponnesus. A canal was projected and by Nero, but was abandoned. The common title of the city in the poets was bimaris, "the city of the two seas."

    The commercial position of Corinth was, therefore, most important, communicating with the eastern and the western world, with the north and the south. The isthmus was one of the four principal points for the celebration of the Grecian games; and in Paul's day great numbers flocked to these contests from all parts of the Mediterranean.

    On the restoration of the city by Julius Caesar, both Greek and Jewish merchants settled in Corinth in such numbers as probably to outnumber the Romans. In Paul's time it was distinctively a commercial center, marked by wealth and luxury. "It was the 'Vanity Fair' of the Roman Empire, at once the London and the Paris of the first century after Christ" (Farrar). It was conspicuous for its immorality. To "corinthianize" was the term for reckless debauchery. Juvenal sarcastically alludes to it as "perfumed Corinth;" and Martial pictures an effeminate fellow boasting of being a Corinthian citizen. The temple of Aphrodite (Venus) employed a thousand ministers. Drunkenness rivaled licentiousness, and Corinthians, when introduced on the stage, were commonly represented as drunk.

    Paul's impression of its profligacy may be seen in his description of heathenism in the first of Romans, and in his stern words concerning sensual sin in the two Corinthian Epistles. "Politically Roman, socially Greek, religiously it was Roman, Greek, Oriental, all in one. When, therefore, the apostle preached to the Corinthians, the Gospel spoke to the whole world and to the living present" (Edwards).

    Called to be saints. See on Rom. i. 7.

    Call upon the name (epikaloumenoiv to onoma). Compare Romans x. 12; Acts ii. 21. The formula is from the Septuagint. See Zech. xiii. 9; Gen. xii. 8; xiii. 4; Psalm cxv. 17. It is used of worship, and here implies prayer to Christ. The first christian prayer recorded as heard by Saul of Tarsus, was Stephen's prayer to Christ, Acts vii. 59. The name of Christ occurs nine times in the first nine verses of this epistle.

    Theirs and ours. A.V. and Rev. connect with Jesus Christ our Lord.

    Better with in every place. Every place in the province where Christians are is our place also. The expression emphasizes the position of Paul as the founder and apostolic head of Christianity in Corinth and in all Achaia.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    1:2 {The church of God} (tei ekklesiai tou qeou). Belonging to God, not to any individual or faction, as this genitive case shows. In #1Th 1:1 Paul wrote "the church of the Thessalonians in God" (en qewi), but "the churches of God" in #1Th 2:14. See same idiom in #1Co 10:32; 11:16,22; 15:9; 2Co 1:1; Ga 1:13, etc. {Which is in Corinth} (tei ousei en korinqwi). See on #Ac 13:1 for idiom. It is God's church even in Corinth, "_laetum et ingens paradoxon_" (Bengel). this city, destroyed by Mummius B.C. 146, had been restored by Julius Caesar a hundred years later, B.C. 44, and now after another hundred years has become very rich and very corrupt. The very word "to Corinthianize" meant to practise vile immoralities in the worship of Aphrodite (Venus). It was located on the narrow Isthmus of the Peloponnesus with two harbors (Lechaeum and Cenchreae). It had schools of rhetoric and philosophy and made a flashy imitation of the real culture of Athens. See #Ac 18 for the story of Paul's work here and now the later developments and divisions in this church will give Paul grave concern as is shown in detail in I and II Corinthians. All the problems of a modern city church come to the front in Corinth. They call for all the wisdom and statesmanship in Paul. {That are sanctified} (hegiasmenois). Perfect passive participle of hagiazw, late form for hagizw, so far found only in the Greek Bible and in ecclesiastical writers. It means to make or to declare hagion (from hagos, awe, reverence, and this from hazw, to venerate). It is significant that Paul uses this word concerning the {called saints} or {called to be saints} (kletois hagiois) in Corinth. Cf. kletos apostolos in #1:1. It is because they are sanctified {in Christ Jesus} (en Christ"i iesou). He is the sphere in which this act of consecration takes place. Note plural, construction according to sense, because ekklesia is a collective substantive. {With all that call upon} (sun pasin tois epikaloumenois). Associative instrumental case with sun rather than kai (and), making a close connection with "saints" just before and so giving the Corinthian Christians a picture of their close unity with the brotherhood everywhere through the common bond of faith. this phrase occurs in the LXX (#Ge 12:8; Zec 13:9) and is applied to Christ as to Jehovah (#2Th 1:7,9,12; Php 2:9,10). Paul heard Stephen pray to Christ as Lord (#Ac 7:59). Here "with a plain and direct reference to the Divinity of our Lord" (Ellicott). {Their Lord and ours} (autwn kai hemwn). this is the interpretation of the Greek commentators and is the correct one, an afterthought and expansion (epanorqwsis) of the previous "our," showing the universality of Christ.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31

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