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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 1 Corinthians 1:20


    CHAPTERS: 1 Corinthians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31

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    King James Bible - 1 Corinthians 1:20

    Where is the wise? where is the scribe? where is the disputer of this world? hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world?

    World English Bible

    Where is the wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the lawyer of this world? Hasn't God made foolish the wisdom of this world?

    Douay-Rheims - 1 Corinthians 1:20

    Where is the wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the disputer of this world? Hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world?

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Where is the wise? where is the scribe? where is the disputer of this world? hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world?

    Greek Textus Receptus


    που
    4226 PRT-I σοφος 4680 A-NSM που 4226 PRT-I γραμματευς 1122 N-NSM που 4226 PRT-I συζητητης 4804 N-NSM του 3588 T-GSM αιωνος 165 N-GSM τουτου 5127 D-GSM ουχι 3780 PRT-I εμωρανεν 3471 5656 V-AAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM θεος 2316 N-NSM την 3588 T-ASF σοφιαν 4678 N-ASF του 3588 T-GSM κοσμου 2889 N-GSM τουτου 5127 D-GSM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (20) -
    Isa 33:18; 53:1

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 1:20

    ¿Qu es del sabio? ¿Qu del escriba? ¿Qu del filsofo de este siglo? ¿No ha enloquecido Dios la sabiduría de este mundo?

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 1 Corinthians 1:20

    Verse 20. Where is the wise-the scribe-the disputer of this
    world?] These words most manifestly refer to the Jews; as the places (Isa. xxix. 14; xxxiii. 18; xliv. 25) to which he refers cannot be understood of any but the Jews.

    The wise man sofov, of the apostle, is the kj chakam of the prophet; whose office it was to teach others.

    The scribe, grammateuv, of the apostle, is the rps sopher of the prophet; this signifies any man of learning, as distinguished from the common people, especially any master of the traditions.

    The disputer, suzhththv, answers to the rd derosh, or rd darshan, the propounder of questions; the seeker of allegorical, mystical, and cabalistical senses from the Holy Scriptures. Now as all these are characters well known among the Jews, and as the words aiwnov toutou, of this world are a simple translation of hzh lw[ olam hazzeh, which is repeatedly used to designate the Jewish republic, there is no doubt that the apostle has the Jews immediately in view. This wisdom of theirs induced them to seek out of the sacred oracles any sense but the true one; and they made the word of God of none effect by their traditions. After them, and precisely on their model, the schoolmen arose; and they rendered the doctrine of the Gospel of no effect by their hypercritical questions, and endless distinctions without differences. By the preaching of Christ crucified God made foolish the wisdom of the Jewish wise men; and, after that the pure religion of Christ had been corrupted by a Church that was of this world, God rendered the wisdom and disputing of the schoolmen foolishness, by the revival of pure Christianity at the Reformation. The Jews themselves allow that nothing is wise, nothing strong, nothing rich, without God.

    "Our rabbins teach that there were two wise men in this world; one was an Israelite, Achitophel, the other was a Gentile, Balaam; but both were miserable in this world." "There were also two strong men in the world; one an Israelite, Samson, the other a Gentile, Goliah; but they were both miserable in this world."There were two rich men in the world; one an Israelite, Korah, the other a Gentile, Haman; but both these were miserable in this world. And why? Because their gifts came not from God." See Schoettgen.

    In truth the world has derived very little, if any, moral good, either from the Jewish rabbins or the Gentile philosophers.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 20. Where is the wise? where is the Scribe? etc.] These are the apostles own words; though he may allude to ( Isaiah 33:18) where there are some phrases much like these, but the meaning is very different.

    Though they are interpreted by the Talmudists in a sense pretty near the apostles; for thus they remark upon them, where is the Scribe? he that counts all the letters which are in the law; where is the receiver, or weigher? who weighs all the light and heavy things in the law; where is he that counted the towers? he who counts, or teaches the three hundred traditions: so that they understand these of their Scribes and Misnic doctors, and such that are curious searchers into the hidden senses of Scripture. The apostle also seems to allude to a distinction that obtained among the Jews, of wise men, Scribes, and mystical interpreters of the word. They had their ymkj , wise men, which was a general name for men of learning and knowledge; and their yrps , Scribes, who interpreted the law in the literal and grammatical sense; and their ynrd , preachers, or disputers, who diligently searched into the hidden meaning of the Scriptures, and sought for and delivered out the mystical and allegorical sense of them, and who used to dispute about them in their schools. These three are sometimes to be met with together, and as distinct from each other. They say that God showed to the first man every generation, wyrwdw , and its expounders, or disputers; and every generation, wymkjw , and its wise men; and every generation, wyrpwsw , and its Scribes. And the apostles sense is, where is the wise? the man that boasts of his superior wisdom and knowledge in the things of nature, whether among the Jews or Gentiles; where is the Scribe? the letter learned man, who takes upon him to give the literal sense of the law; where is the disputer of this world? the Jewish world, who pretends to the knowledge of the more abstruse and secret senses of Scripture; where are these men? they are not to be found among those that God employs in the ministration of the Gospel; he has laid them aside, and chosen others, where are they? what use have they been of to men? are men under their instructions the better, either in principle or practice? where are the thousands that have been turned to God by their wisdom, as can be shown by the faithful ministers of the Gospel? where are they? let them come and produce their cause, and bring forth their strong reasons against the Gospel they account foolishness, and try if these will stand before its superior power and wisdom; where are they? are they not fools, with all their wisdom and learning? The words may be rendered, where is the searcher, or inquirer of this world? and may design the same sort of persons whom the Jews call rqjmh ymkj , the wise men of search, or inquiry f9 , and sometimes rqjmh yna , the men of search, or inquiry f10 ; by whom they seem to intend such who search into the nature of things, who study natural philosophy. Hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world? by bringing in the Gospel scheme, which the men of the world, the greatest wits in it, are not able to understand; by laying their wisdom aside as useless in the business of salvation; by showing it to be vain and empty, and of no service in things spiritual and divine; by detecting, through the ministration of the Gospel, the sophisms of men, and showing that the schemes both Jews and Gentiles give into abound with folly, with stupid notions, and are full of gross errors and fatal mistakes.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 17-25 - Paul had been bred up in Jewish learning; but the plain preaching of crucified Jesus, was more powerful than all the oratory and philosoph of the heathen world. This is the sum and substance of the gospel Christ crucified is the foundation of all our hopes, the fountain of all our joys. And by his death we live. The preaching of salvation for lost sinners by the sufferings and death of the Son of God, i explained and faithfully applied, appears foolishness to those in the way to destruction. The sensual, the covetous, the proud, an ambitious, alike see that the gospel opposes their favourite pursuits But those who receive the gospel, and are enlightened by the Spirit of God, see more of God's wisdom and power in the doctrine of Chris crucified, than in all his other works. God left a great part of the world to follow the dictates of man's boasted reason, and the event ha shown that human wisdom is folly, and is unable to find or retain the knowledge of God as the Creator. It pleased him, by the foolishness of preaching, to save them that believe. By the foolishness of preaching not by what could justly be called foolish preaching. But the thin preached was foolishness to wordly-wise men. The gospel ever was, an ever will be, foolishness to all in the road to destruction. The message of Christ, plainly delivered, ever has been a sure touchston by which men may learn what road they are travelling. But the despise doctrine of salvation by faith in a crucified Saviour, God in huma nature, purchasing the church with his own blood, to save multitudes even all that believe, from ignorance, delusion, and vice, has bee blessed in every age. And the weakest instruments God uses, ar stronger in their effects, than the strongest men can use. Not tha there is foolishness or weakness in God, but what men consider as such overcomes all their admired wisdom and strength.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    που
    4226 PRT-I σοφος 4680 A-NSM που 4226 PRT-I γραμματευς 1122 N-NSM που 4226 PRT-I συζητητης 4804 N-NSM του 3588 T-GSM αιωνος 165 N-GSM τουτου 5127 D-GSM ουχι 3780 PRT-I εμωρανεν 3471 5656 V-AAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM θεος 2316 N-NSM την 3588 T-ASF σοφιαν 4678 N-ASF του 3588 T-GSM κοσμου 2889 N-GSM τουτου 5127 D-GSM

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    20.
    Scribe (grammateuv). Always in the New Testament in the Jewish sense, an interpreter of the law, except Acts xix. 35, the town-clerk.

    Disputer (suzhththv). Only here. Compare the kindred verb suzhtew to question with, Mark i. 27; Luke xxii. 23; Acts vi. 9; and suzhthsiv disputation, Acts xv. 2, 7. Referring to Grecian sophistical reasoners, while scribe refers to rabbinical hair-splitters.

    World (aiwnov). See on John i. 9. More correctly, age or period.

    Made foolish (emwranen). Proved it to be practical folly; stupefied it. Compare Rom. i. 22. Possibly with a latent suggestion of the judicial power of God to make it foolish.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    1:20 {Where is the wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the disputer of this world?} (pou sofos; pou grammateus; pou sunzetetes tou aiwnos toutou;). Paul makes use of #Isa 33:18 without exact quotation. The sudden retreat of Sennacherib with the annihilation of his officers. "On the tablet of Shalmaneser in the Assyrian Gallery of the British Museum there is a surprisingly exact picture of the scene described by Isaiah" (Robertson and Plummer). Note the absence of the Greek article in each of these rhetorical questions though the idea is clearly definite. Probably sofos refers to the Greek philosopher, grammateus to the Jewish scribe and sunzetetes suits both the Greek and the Jewish disputant and doubter (#Ac 6:9; 9:29; 17:18; 28:29). There is a note of triumph in these questions. The word sunzetetes occurs here alone in the N.T. and elsewhere only in Ignatius, Eph. 18 quoting this passage, but the papyri give the verb sunzetew for disputing (questioning together). {Hath not God made foolish?} (ouci emwranen ho qeos;). Strong negative form with aorist active indicative difficult of precise translation, "Did not God make foolish?" The old verb mwrainw from mwros, foolish, was to be foolish, to act foolish, qen to prove one foolish as here or to make foolish as in #Ro 1:22. In #Mt 5:13; Lu 14:34 it is used of salt that is tasteless. {World} (kosmou). Synonymous with aiwn (age), orderly arrangement, qen the non-Christian cosmos.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31

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