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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - 1 Corinthians 6:7


    CHAPTERS: 1 Corinthians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     
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    King James Bible - 1 Corinthians 6:7

    Now therefore there is utterly a fault among you, because ye go to law one with another. Why do ye not rather take wrong? why do ye not rather suffer yourselves to be defrauded?

    World English Bible

    Therefore it is already altogether a defect in you, that you have lawsuits one with another. Why not rather be wronged? Why not rather be defrauded?

    Douay-Rheims - 1 Corinthians 6:7

    Already indeed there is plainly a fault among you, that you have lawsuits one with another. Why do you not rather take wrong? Why do you not rather suffer yourselves to be defrauded?

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Now therefore there is utterly a fault among you, because ye go to
    law one with another. Why do ye not rather take wrong? why do ye not rather suffer yourselves to be defrauded?

    Greek Textus Receptus


    ηδη
    2235 ADV μεν 3303 PRT ουν 3767 CONJ ολως 3654 ADV ηττημα 2275 N-NSN εν 1722 PREP υμιν 5213 P-2DP εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S οτι 3754 CONJ κριματα 2917 N-APN εχετε 2192 5719 V-PAI-2P μεθ 3326 PREP εαυτων 1438 F-3GPM δια 1223 PREP τι 5101 I-ASN ουχι 3780 PRT-I μαλλον 3123 ADV αδικεισθε 91 5743 V-PPI-2P δια 1223 PREP τι 5101 I-ASN ουχι 3780 PRT-I μαλλον 3123 ADV αποστερεισθε 650 5743 V-PPI-2P

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (7) -
    Pr 2:5,8-10 Ho 10:2 Jas 4:1-3

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 6:7

    Así que, por cierto es ya una falta en vosotros que tengis pleitos entre vosotros mismos. ¿Por qu no soportis antes la injuria? ¿Por qu no soportis antes la calumnia?

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - 1 Corinthians 6:7

    Verse 7. There is utterly a fault among you] There is a most manifest defect among you, 1. Of peaceableness; 2. Of
    brotherly love; 3. Of mutual confidence; and 4. Of reverence for God, and concern for the honour of his cause.

    Why do ye not rather take wrong?] Better suffer an injury than take a method of redressing yourselves which must injure your own peace, and greatly dishonour the cause of God.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 7. Now therefore there is utterly a fault among you , etc.] Or a defect: a want of brotherly love, or there would be no occasion to go to law at all; a want of wisdom and conduct, or proper persons would be pitched upon, and chosen out from among themselves to be arbitrators and judge between them; and a want of care among their leaders, who else would have pointed out to them such a method of accommodation, and not have suffered them to go the lengths they did: because ye go to law one with another ; which would never be, was there not a declension among you, a decay of your first love, and of the power of religion and true godliness: why do ye not rather take wrong why do ye not rather suffer yourselves to be defrauded ? than to go to law, especially before unjust persons and unbelievers, taking the advice of Christ, ( Matthew 5:40) It is more advisable to a believer to suffer wrong than to go to law with any man, and especially with a brother. It is a petition in the Jewish liturgy f79 , let it please thee, O Lord God, and the God of my fathers, to deliver me this day, and every day -from hard judgment, and a severe adversary, tyrb b wnya ybw tyrb b awh yb , whether he be a Son of the covenant, or whether he be not a son of the covenant.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-8 -
    Christians should not contend with one another, for they are brethren This, if duly attended to, would prevent many law-suits, and end man quarrels and disputes. In matters of great damage to ourselves of families, we may use lawful means to right ourselves, but Christian should be of a forgiving temper. Refer the matters in dispute, rathe than go to law about them. They are trifles, and may easily be settled if you first conquer your own spirits. Bear and forbear, and the men of least skill among you may end your quarrels. It is a shame that littl quarrels should grow to such a head among Christians, that they cannot be determined by the brethren. The peace of a man's own mind, and the calm of his neighbourhood, are worth more than victory. Lawsuits coul not take place among brethren, unless there were faults among them.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    ηδη
    2235 ADV μεν 3303 PRT ουν 3767 CONJ ολως 3654 ADV ηττημα 2275 N-NSN εν 1722 PREP υμιν 5213 P-2DP εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S οτι 3754 CONJ κριματα 2917 N-APN εχετε 2192 5719 V-PAI-2P μεθ 3326 PREP εαυτων 1438 F-3GPM δια 1223 PREP τι 5101 I-ASN ουχι 3780 PRT-I μαλλον 3123 ADV αδικεισθε 91 5743 V-PPI-2P δια 1223 PREP τι 5101 I-ASN ουχι 3780 PRT-I μαλλον 3123 ADV αποστερεισθε 650 5743 V-PPI-2P

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    7. Now therefore (hdh
    men oun). Men oun nay, as in ver. 4, at once looks back to the preceding thought, and continues it, bringing under special consideration the fact that brother goes to law with brother. Hdh already or at once is a temporal adverb, but with a logical force and enhancing the nay. The connection of thought is: Is there not one wise man among you who is competent to act as an arbitrator between brethren, so that christian brethren must needs take their differences into the civil courts and before heathen judges? Nay; such a proceeding at once implies the existence of a litigious spirit generally, which is unchristian, and detrimental to you.

    Fault among you (htthma en umin). Only here and Rom. xi. 12. See note. %Htthma fault, is from httwn less. Lit., diminution, decrease. Hence used in the sense of defeat, Isa. xxxi. 8: "Young men shall be discomfited lit., shall be for diminution." Similarly the kindred verb hJttaomai, in 2 Corinthians xii. 13, made inferior; and in 2 Pet. ii. 19, 20, overcome. See note there. Compare 2 Macc. x. 24. In classical Greek h=tta means defeat, and is contrasted with nikh victory by Plato and Thucydides. The meaning here is loss. En among is omitted by the best texts, so that we should read a loss to you, which Rev. gives in margin, reading in the text a defect in you. The spirit of litigation which runs into wrong and fraud (ver. 8) is a source of damage, resulting in forfeiture of the kingdom of God (ver. 9), and in loss of spiritual power.

    Ye go to law (krimata ecete). Rev., more correctly, ye have lawsuits. Not the same phrase as in ver. 6. Krima in the New Testament almost universally means judgment or decree, as Rom. v. 16. See on 2 Pet. ii. 3. In classical Greek it has also the meaning of the matter of judgment, the question in litigation. So Aeschylus: "The matter (krima) is not easy to judge. Choose me not as judge" ("Suppliants," 391). Here the meaning is legal proceedings, lawsuits. So in Septuagint, Job xxxi. 13; Exod. xxiii. 6. Suffer yourselves to be defrauded (apostereisqe). Rev., more literally, "why not rather be defrauded?" In classical Greek the word means,

    1, to rob or despoil.

    2, to detach or withdraw one's self from a person or thing.

    Aposterein eJauton was a regular phrase for separation from civic life. So Oedipus says: "I, noblest of the sons of Thebes, have cut myself off (ajpesterhs ejmauton. Sophocles, "Oedipus Tyrannus," 1381). 3. To withhold or avert. So Io to Prometheus: "Do not, after proffering me a benefit, withhold it" ("Prometheus," 796). The maidens say:

    "May King Zeus avert the hateful marriage" (Aeschylus, "Suppliants," 1063). In the New Testament the word occurs five times.

    In Mark x. 19, defraud not is apparently Mark's rendering of the tenth commandment. According to the inner meaning of the commandment as conceived by Jesus, the coveting of another's goods is, in heart, a depriving him of them. In 1 Cor. vii. 5 it is used of connubial relations. In 1 Tim. vi. 5, of those who are deprived or destitute of the truth. 91 Dr. Morison, on Mark x. 19, justly observes that defraud is too narrow a rendering. The word means rather "to deprive of what is one's due, whether by 'hook,' 'crook,' or force, or in any other way."


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    6:7 {Nay, already it is altogether a defect among you} (ede men oun holws hettema humin estin). "Indeed therefore there is to you already (to begin with, ede, before any question of courts) wholly defeat." hettema (from hettaomai) is only here, #Ro 11:12; Isa 31:8 and ecclesiastical writers. See hettaomai (from hettwn, less) in #2Co 12:13; 2Pe 2:19f. nike was victory and hetta defeat with the Greeks. It is defeat for Christians to have lawsuits (krimata, usually decrees or judgments) with one another. this was proof of the failure of love and forgiveness (#Col 3:13). {Take wrong} (adikeisqe). Present middle indicative, of old verb adikew (from adikos, not right). Better undergo wrong yourself than suffer {defeat} in the matter of love and forgiveness of a brother. {Be defrauded} (apostereisqe). Permissive middle again like adikeisqe. Allow yourselves to be robbed (old verb to deprive, to rob) rather than have a lawsuit.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20

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